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King Arthur

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By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,Sun Staff Writer | August 8, 1994
Constructing a model of Mount Fuji, decorating paper kimonos and celebrating Grandparents' Day are a few of the ways kindergartners at Roland Park Elementary/Middle and five other Maryland elementary schools might learn about Japan this year.It's all part of an experimental curriculum that is designed to provide a broad cultural blueprint for the children as they learn basic skills.The program, developed by "Cultural Literacy" author E. D. Hirsch Jr., is based on his belief that "everyone within a culture would share a base of knowledge," said Mary Lusk, associate director of the Core Knowledge Foundation, which wrote the curriculum.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Annapolis Summer Garden Theatre is capping its season with "Monty Python's Spamalot" an irreverent retelling of the quest for the Holy Grail. The silliness of "Spamalot" is totally at home in Summer Garden's outdoor theater, where a lively cast delivers a production of zesty dancing guys and girls, lusty choruses and zany comedians. The 2005 musical, with book and lyrics by Eric Idle, who also composed the music with John Du Prez, is based on the 1975 movie "Monty Python and the Holy Grail.
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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | January 22, 1993
Once upon a time, in the most noble kingdom of Mount Airy, the people were visited by a king who told them wondrous stories of magic and quests and knights and dragons.He came in full regalia -- golden jeweled crown, red cape and tunic, and by his side a shining silver sword, the mighty Excalibur.King Arthur arrived Tuesday at Mount Airy Elementary School to teach his subjects how to peaceably settle their differences and properly go about a quest -- how to set a goal and attain it."I started out as a squire," he told the students after picking out six youngsters to be his helpers.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
When Lerner and Loewe's "Camelot" debuted on Broadway in 1960 with a cast headed by Richard Burton as King Arthur, Julie Andrews as Guinevere and Robert Goulet, an unknown Canadian in his first starring role, as Lancelot, the musical became an instant hit. Fifty-three years later, "Camelot" retains its luster, especially in 2nd Star's current production, now playing at Bowie Playhouse in White Marsh Park. Frederick Loewe's music and Alan Jay Lerner's lyrics are magic. Lerner is also responsible for the book, allowing King Arthur's message of hope and idealism to permeate almost every scene.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | March 23, 2008
Lou Diamond Phillips is no ordinary King Arthur. On stage Camelot runs at Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St., through April 6: 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturdays; 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Sundays. $25-$70. 410-547-7328 or france-merrickpac.com.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 7, 2004
Hilariously, Touchstone Pictures has promoted King Arthur as a fresh tale, not a clone, and one or two smart publications have taken the bait. Still, it plays like a remake - not of Knights of the Round Table (1953) but of director Antoine Fuqua's previous Tears of the Sun (2003). To name the most pertinent similarities: A commando unit treks through war-torn territory on a perilous snatch-and-grab mission (in contemporary Nigeria there, antique northern Britain here). Its chief (Bruce Willis as a top Navy SEAL, Clive Owen as King Arthur)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2013
When Lerner and Loewe's "Camelot" debuted on Broadway in 1960 with a cast headed by Richard Burton as King Arthur, Julie Andrews as Guinevere and Robert Goulet, an unknown Canadian in his first starring role, as Lancelot, the musical became an instant hit. Fifty-three years later, "Camelot" retains its luster, especially in 2nd Star's current production, now playing at Bowie Playhouse in White Marsh Park. Frederick Loewe's music and Alan Jay Lerner's lyrics are magic. Lerner is also responsible for the book, allowing King Arthur's message of hope and idealism to permeate almost every scene.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1996
For a really famous guy, he's got a peculiar bio.Professional experience: Pulls sword out of stone, creams the Saxons, rules as once and future king.Hobbies: Heavy metal, courtly love, hanging with the guys, heroic quests.Personal: Separates from Guinevere after her fling with Lancelot; permanently estranged from illegitimate son, Mordred; spends a little too much time with a sorcerer named Merlin.If King Arthur were alive today, he'd undoubtedly be labeled an obsessive-compulsive (give up on the Grail already, sire)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 22, 2001
The opening of Lerner and Loewe's classic musical "Camelot" last weekend marked Pasadena Theatre Company's arrival at its home in the Chesapeake Center for the Creative Arts, a state-of-the-art facility that easily accommodates this large-scale production. I'd rank "Camelot" - an ideal choice for the Brooklyn Park's center's first extended run - as the biggest and best show the company has mounted in the past five years. With its 45-member cast and 14-piece orchestra, creative staging and dazzling special effects, the Pasadena troupe uses all that the 900-seat theater offers in sound, lighting and stage space flexibility.
NEWS
June 10, 2007
King Arthur -- Jillian Elwood will portray Guinevere and Don Warrick will appear as King Arthur when the Covered Bridge Theatre Company presents the Lerner and Loewe musical Camelot at the Milburn Stone Theatre on the North East campus, One Seahawk Drive. The Newark Symphony Orchestra will provide music. Show times are 3 p.m. today and June 17 and 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets are $20, $18 for students and seniors, and $10 for children age 12 and younger. 410-287-1037.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2009
Dianna Cuatto's award-winning ballet Excalibur, which premiered in 2006, is being readied for what promises to be a spectacular return to Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts later this month. Exciting as it is to see Ballet Theatre of Maryland dancers perform at Maryland Hall, it is more dazzling up close to watch these dancers in rehearsal at BTM's studio in the basement of the Conte Building in Annapolis. Male dancers lifted their partners high enough to appear as if the ballerinas' heads nearly touched the ceiling.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | March 23, 2008
Lou Diamond Phillips is no ordinary King Arthur. On stage Camelot runs at Hippodrome Theatre, 12 N. Eutaw St., through April 6: 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays; 2 p.m., 8 p.m. Saturdays; 1 p.m., 6:30 p.m. Sundays. $25-$70. 410-547-7328 or france-merrickpac.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 2008
The musical king Lerner and Loewe, known for musicals such as My Fair Lady, adapted T.H. White's The Once and Future King into Camelot. The musical focuses on King Arthur's torment over the affair between his wife, Guenevere, and Sir Lancelot. The traveling production opens at the Hippodrome on Tuesday and stars Lou Diamond Phillips as King Arthur. Phillips is famous for his roles in Young Guns, Stand and Deliver, La Bamba and the Broadway production of The King and I.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Reporter | October 7, 2007
I PULLED INTO WHITE River Junction in July anticipating a born-again Vermont town crackling with artistic energy and a glam organic vibe. Instead, I found a tidy, nearly deserted village and nary a hint of cool. So much for Internet intelligence -- or so I thought. White River Junction's facade served as an ideal ruse for this unsuspecting traveler. I quickly discovered that the village exults in its persona as an arts hub masquerading as a sleepy way station to elsewhere. That anyone would stumble into town expecting instant coolness only escalates the amusement of residents such as Kim Souza, who abides by the village's unofficial motto: "Make your own fun."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Sun | September 21, 2007
Camelot was an instant hit when it opened on Broadway in 1960, boasting a tuneful score by Frederick Loewe set to the witty lyrics of Alan Jay Lerner. Almost 50 years later, this musical retains much of its luster, as shown by Pasadena Theatre Company's current production of the classic tale of King Arthur, Guinevere and the Knights of the Round Table. It benefits from the efforts of co-directors Chuck Dick and Beverly Van Joolen, music director Tom Jackson and the skills of 35 local performers and behind-the-scenes craftsmen and technicians.
NEWS
June 10, 2007
King Arthur -- Jillian Elwood will portray Guinevere and Don Warrick will appear as King Arthur when the Covered Bridge Theatre Company presents the Lerner and Loewe musical Camelot at the Milburn Stone Theatre on the North East campus, One Seahawk Drive. The Newark Symphony Orchestra will provide music. Show times are 3 p.m. today and June 17 and 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday. Tickets are $20, $18 for students and seniors, and $10 for children age 12 and younger. 410-287-1037.
NEWS
July 11, 2004
College offering one-session course on King Arthur Harford Community College is offering a one-session course, "King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table." from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Wednesday at Fallston Hall on the HCC campus. The legend of King Arthur, a blend of history and myth, has been added to by generations of storytellers. For more information, call HCC's Continuing Education and Training Division at 410-836-4376 or 410-879-8920, Ext. 376. Entries sought for playwriting contest Harford Community College is seeking entries for a one-act playwriting contest.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kronke and David Kronke,Special to The Sun | July 7, 1995
From "Knights of the Round Table" to "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," from "Camelot" to "Excalibur," the legend of King Arthur has always intrigued filmmakers.Whether reverent, pompously mock-reverent, outright mocking or musically rendered, the medieval tale of Arthur and his knights Camelot has always made for a good yarn. But ask the principals of "First Knight" -- the latest, wildly romantic, incarnation of Arthurian legend -- to describe their film's inspirations, and the viewpoints become widely skewed.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 7, 2006
Ballet Theatre of Maryland ended the season with the premiere of artistic director Dianna Cuatto's Excalibur - the choreographer's best and most ambitious work to date, in which she told the Arthurian legend sensitively through two hours of dance. All of Cuatto's hallmarks were apparent - lyrical partnering, strong athleticism, vigorous male dancers in stage combat, precise interweaving between lines, and the sheer beauty and power of their ensemble dancing. The dancers' individual growth was apparent, particularly from Joshua Lenihan's Lancelot and Christopher Pennix's King Lot. Celtic music provided by Maggie Sansone greatly enhanced the performance.
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