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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 24, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Sailing across the Gulf of Aqaba in his royal yacht, Jordan's King Abdullah IIpaid his first visit to Israel yesterday to promote Mideast peace and better economic cooperation between his Arab kingdom and the Jewish state. Leaving behind the disguises with which he has stirred up Jordan during his first year as monarch, the king came with a characteristic message of optimism about peace but did not hide his displeasure that the peace treaty between Israel and his country has not produced more dividends.
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NEWS
By Noha El-Hennawy and Borzou Daragahi and Noha El-Hennawy and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2007
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia -- Bush administration attempts to broker a truce between its Arab allies and Israel suffered a setback yesterday as leaders at an Arab League summit here condemned Washington's foreign policy and refused to budge on a peace proposal that Israel has rejected. Middle East leaders and diplomats gathered to try to revive the Middle East peace process but instead focused much of their attention on U.S. policy in the region. The summit's host, King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, condemned the "illegitimate foreign occupation" of Iraq, and Arab League Secretary General Amr Moussa lamented "the absence of honest mediation" in the Arab-Israeli conflict, a reference to U.S. officials perceived as too pro-Israeli.
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NEWS
November 11, 2005
Try as they have in recent years, al-Qaida affiliates had failed to execute successful suicide attacks in the Hashemite kingdom. Jordan's intelligence and security services, among the best in the region, had always managed to foil the plots - until Wednesday, when Islamic militants finally hit their mark with bombings at three Western-operated hotels in Amman. Like Sharm el-Sheik, London and Madrid, the Jordanian capital was targeted because of its government's help in the U.S.-led Iraq war. Just as in those cities, the majority of the dead in Amman were civilians and locals, including guests at a wedding.
NEWS
November 11, 2005
Try as they have in recent years, al-Qaida affiliates had failed to execute successful suicide attacks in the Hashemite kingdom. Jordan's intelligence and security services, among the best in the region, had always managed to foil the plots - until Wednesday, when Islamic militants finally hit their mark with bombings at three Western-operated hotels in Amman. Like Sharm el-Sheik, London and Madrid, the Jordanian capital was targeted because of its government's help in the U.S.-led Iraq war. Just as in those cities, the majority of the dead in Amman were civilians and locals, including guests at a wedding.
NEWS
August 3, 2005
ASSESSING U.S.-Saudi relations following the death of King Fahd requires us to return to Crawford, Texas, and the April visit of then Crown Prince Abdullah. The meeting between the de facto ruler of Saudi Arabia and President Bush reaffirmed the close relationship of the two countries and set the parameters for their dealings on all the key topics - oil, terrorism, Middle East peace and political reform. The commitments reached then are a good indication of what matters to the now King Abdullah and the course he will pursue as successor to his half-brother.
NEWS
By Allen Keiswetter | August 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - The death of Saudi King Fahd and the ascension of Abdullah Abdulaziz al Saud, his half-brother, to the throne portend no major changes in the U.S.-Saudi relations or on issues of great importance to the United States such as oil policy or terrorism. As crown prince, Abdullah has been the de facto ruler since 1995, when King Fahd had a stroke. President Bush knows King Abdullah well, and the two have met twice at the president's ranch in Crawford, Texas. Principal changes are likely to be at home.
NEWS
By Noha El-Hennawy and Borzou Daragahi and Noha El-Hennawy and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 29, 2007
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia -- Bush administration attempts to broker a truce between its Arab allies and Israel suffered a setback yesterday as leaders at an Arab League summit here condemned Washington's foreign policy and refused to budge on a peace proposal that Israel has rejected. Middle East leaders and diplomats gathered to try to revive the Middle East peace process but instead focused much of their attention on U.S. policy in the region. The summit's host, King Abdullah of Saudi Arabia, condemned the "illegitimate foreign occupation" of Iraq, and Arab League Secretary General Amr Moussa lamented "the absence of honest mediation" in the Arab-Israeli conflict, a reference to U.S. officials perceived as too pro-Israeli.
NEWS
By Samuel L. Lewis and Jonathan Jacoby | May 6, 2004
WHEN JORDAN'S King Abdullah II visits President Bush today, it will be one of Mr. Bush's most important meetings about the Middle East with another head of state. The king has concerns about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that the United States needs to address in order to help stabilize the situation in Iraq, reduce anti-American fury in the Middle East and protect our ally, Israel. Yet the critical importance of Jordan to American interests is often overlooked. As the June 30 deadline for transferring power in Iraq nears, Jordan - as one of America's closest allies - must start playing an active, visible role in supporting America's transition plans.
NEWS
February 3, 1999
AT LAST Jordan will get a king whose mother tongue is English and whose wife comes from the Palestinian majority. Already, Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat and U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright have met with Crown Prince Abdullah, as have emissaries or callers from Israel, Libya, Saudi Arabia and Iraq.What concerns them is policy. Yet Jordan's foreign policy of peace with Israel, usefulness to the United States, cooperation with the Palestinian Authority and great care with respect to Baghdad is not likely to change.
NEWS
By EDWARD S. WALKER JR | October 12, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has outlined a strategy for fighting terrorists who are trying to "enslave whole nations and intimidate the world," saying that "defeating the militant network is difficult because it thrives, like a parasite, on the suffering and frustration of others." He spoke of the U.S. battle against extremist ideologies and described Iraq as the central front against terror. When he spoke at the United Nations Sept. 14, he said that "this war will not be won by force of arms alone.
NEWS
By EDWARD S. WALKER JR | October 12, 2005
WASHINGTON -- President Bush has outlined a strategy for fighting terrorists who are trying to "enslave whole nations and intimidate the world," saying that "defeating the militant network is difficult because it thrives, like a parasite, on the suffering and frustration of others." He spoke of the U.S. battle against extremist ideologies and described Iraq as the central front against terror. When he spoke at the United Nations Sept. 14, he said that "this war will not be won by force of arms alone.
NEWS
August 3, 2005
ASSESSING U.S.-Saudi relations following the death of King Fahd requires us to return to Crawford, Texas, and the April visit of then Crown Prince Abdullah. The meeting between the de facto ruler of Saudi Arabia and President Bush reaffirmed the close relationship of the two countries and set the parameters for their dealings on all the key topics - oil, terrorism, Middle East peace and political reform. The commitments reached then are a good indication of what matters to the now King Abdullah and the course he will pursue as successor to his half-brother.
NEWS
By Allen Keiswetter | August 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - The death of Saudi King Fahd and the ascension of Abdullah Abdulaziz al Saud, his half-brother, to the throne portend no major changes in the U.S.-Saudi relations or on issues of great importance to the United States such as oil policy or terrorism. As crown prince, Abdullah has been the de facto ruler since 1995, when King Fahd had a stroke. President Bush knows King Abdullah well, and the two have met twice at the president's ranch in Crawford, Texas. Principal changes are likely to be at home.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 2, 2005
CAIRO, Egypt - In a region that is increasingly defined by instability, the Saudi royal family moved promptly and assuredly yesterday to project an image of certainty, for the benefit of both domestic and international stability. At the same time that it was announced that King Fahd had died, Crown Prince Abdullah was declared the new monarch, and the Saudi defense minister, Prince Sultan, was named the new crown prince. Within three days of the announcement, a funeral and ceremony to declare loyalty to the new king is to be completed.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 7, 2004
WASHINGTON - President Bush apologized yesterday for the abuse of Iraqi prisoners at the hands of U.S. soldiers and said he had scolded Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld for his handling of the scandal. But the president rejected calls to oust Rumsfeld. "I told him I should have known about the pictures and the report," Bush said. He was referring to graphic photos that have documented mistreatment of Iraqi prisoners and an Army report that faulted U.S. soldiers for "sadistic, blatant and wanton criminal abuses."
NEWS
By Samuel L. Lewis and Jonathan Jacoby | May 6, 2004
WHEN JORDAN'S King Abdullah II visits President Bush today, it will be one of Mr. Bush's most important meetings about the Middle East with another head of state. The king has concerns about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict that the United States needs to address in order to help stabilize the situation in Iraq, reduce anti-American fury in the Middle East and protect our ally, Israel. Yet the critical importance of Jordan to American interests is often overlooked. As the June 30 deadline for transferring power in Iraq nears, Jordan - as one of America's closest allies - must start playing an active, visible role in supporting America's transition plans.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 2, 2005
CAIRO, Egypt - In a region that is increasingly defined by instability, the Saudi royal family moved promptly and assuredly yesterday to project an image of certainty, for the benefit of both domestic and international stability. At the same time that it was announced that King Fahd had died, Crown Prince Abdullah was declared the new monarch, and the Saudi defense minister, Prince Sultan, was named the new crown prince. Within three days of the announcement, a funeral and ceremony to declare loyalty to the new king is to be completed.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | August 2, 1998
AMMAN, Jordan -- Hussein Ibn Talal, king of Jordan, longest-serving ruler in the world.He has survived war against Israel, the occasional enmity of neighboring Syria and Iraq, about a dozen assassination attempts and a bloody civil war against the Palestine Liberation Organization.Once ignored and stripped of influence, the king has come to be regarded as the elder statesman of the Middle East, a voice of sanity in a world of hateful rhetoric, a moderate among radicals, a binding force for his own diverse community of tribesmen and Palestinians.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 14, 2002
WASHINGTON - An anxious King Abdullah II of Jordan ended a visit to the United States yesterday after 10 days of trying to build bridges - between himself and President Bush, between America and the Arab world, and between Jews and Arabs in the United States. To everyone he met, he delivered a stark message about the need for forceful American intervention to end the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. At no time since the first Arab-Israeli war of 1948, he said, has such involvement been more urgently needed.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | April 24, 2000
JERUSALEM -- Sailing across the Gulf of Aqaba in his royal yacht, Jordan's King Abdullah IIpaid his first visit to Israel yesterday to promote Mideast peace and better economic cooperation between his Arab kingdom and the Jewish state. Leaving behind the disguises with which he has stirred up Jordan during his first year as monarch, the king came with a characteristic message of optimism about peace but did not hide his displeasure that the peace treaty between Israel and his country has not produced more dividends.
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