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By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 22, 1997
Once again, Kinetics Dance Theatre has reinvented itself. Since last August, choreographer Anne-Alex Packard has held the artistic reins for the Howard County-based dance company. The company's recent debut performance at the Baltimore Museum of Art demonstrated that Packard has friends in high places willing to help the choreographer put her best foot forward.Kinetics' newly reconstituted company of eight women relied heartily on guest artists to pull the performance together. Overall, this established a rocky sense of accomplishment with Packard's dances almost lost in the shuffle of personalities.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2014
It's the one weekend in Baltimore when people riding large objects through land, water, sand and mud is a common sight. It's time again for American Visionary Art Museum 's Kinetic Sculpture Race. Kinetic veterans Melissa and Phillip Smith will be competing in the race, entering with their sculpture, Chessie, a front-wheel drive, rear steering, reverse trike that resembles a sea monster. "We build it with as little new material as possible and use lots of items we find on the roadside and construction Dumpsters, calling it 'sculpture treasure,'" said Melissa Smith, 35, of Catonsville.
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FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | May 23, 1994
Kinetics Dance Theatre's performance over the weekend at the Howard County Center for the Arts was basically a duplicate of its Gala Performance a month ago. Except for an exciting new work by company member Amanda Thom-Woodson, "Between Two," the program contained the same five dances: "Gesange des junge Liebee," "Water Works," "Missa Criolla" and "Confrontations" by Ken Skrzesz, and "The Life and Times of . . . " by Ms. Woodson."
FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
It's not every day a giant pink poodle assists with a marriage proposal. On May 4, Bob Keefer, 38, proposed to his girlfriend of two years, Erin Alexander, 30, at the 15th annual Kinetic Sculpture Race. Unbeknownst to Alexander, Keefer arranged with the American Visionary Art Museum to have Fifi, the museum's famous fluffy poodle, deliver the engagement ring, which was designed with one of Erin's great-grandmother's diamonds. Once Fifi delivered the special package, Keefer took off his shirt to reveal a tuxedo shirt underneath and proposed to Alexander in the middle of the mud pit. "I was completely shocked," says Alexander.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin | November 11, 1991
Kinetics Dance Theatre, under the artistic direction of Alvin Mayes, premiered three works during the company's spirited performance last weekend at the Howard County Center for the Arts.Mr. Mayes, new to this job, closed the evening of seven dances with his latest, "Zooming," an abstract and buoyant work for nine dancers to the fanciful saxophone of Lenny Pickett. With its erratic and whimsical walks and stop-and-go dynamics, "Zooming" gave the company the chance to show just how well it is shaping up -- technically as well as choreographically.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | February 27, 1995
Phillip Arnoult and his Theatre Project have long been a haven for area dancers and dance fans. In keeping with that tradition, Kinetics, the Howard County-based troupe, opened its premiere-laden and well-conceived concert of dances Thursday night.All but one of the five works -- Jan Van Dyke's "Round Dance" -- were new. Created in 1985 to music of Peter Gabriel, "Round Dance" shimmered with imagery culled from tribal rituals. Eight dancers, crouched about a circle of light, rhythmically pounded their hands on the floor or stomped their feet.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin | September 16, 1991
Don't be fooled into thinking that Kinetics Dance Company's founder Dorothy Fried has disappeared into the bureaucratic woodwork of managing her company by turning over its artistic direction to local choreographer Alvin Mayes. The company's performance yesterday afternoon at the Baltimore Museum of Art, while having the distinction of Mr. Mayes'artistic debut, contained the latest and strongest choreographic venture by Ms. Fried.Ms. Fried's nearly hourlong work, "The State of My Art," that closed the evening of five dances is in four distinct, highly theatrical and entertaining sections.
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | March 24, 1995
Violence, fear, loss and running water are just some of the themes Kinetics Dance Theatre explores in three performances this weekend at the Howard County Center for the Arts in Ellicott City.The first performance will be presented at the company's 11th annual Gala Concert at 8 p.m. today. The black tie fund-raiser will feature a champagne and dessert reception after the performance.4 The concert will be repeated at 8 p.m. tomorrow.A free student concert, featuring a lecture and demonstration by the Kinetics Student Company, will be performed at 3 p.m. Sunday.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin and J. L. Conklin,Special to The Sun | April 12, 1994
Kinetics, a dance troupe based in Howard County, has had its share of artistic ups and downs in its first 10 years. At a gala performance last Friday celebrating its 10th anniversary, the attractive and talented company proved it is on the upswing.Under the artistic and executive direction of Ken Skrzesz, Kinetics is auspiciously poised for the future.Friday's performance at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre featured Kinetics' professional and apprentice troupes. Four dances were choreographed by Mr. Skrzesz and one by company member Amanda Thom-Woodson.
FEATURES
By J. L. Conklin | March 18, 1991
Kinetics Dance Theatre, under the artistic direction of Dorothy Fried, offered three new dances by distinctly different regional choreographers in the company's concert last weekend at the Howard County Center for the Arts.Guest choreographer Alvin Mayes, who teaches at the University of Maryland, College Park, premiered "Aurora Borealis," a dance that despite its sophisticated sensuality and strong mirror-image movements appeared hollow and incomplete. The problem was more with the performance than with the abstract dance: The dancers looked basically uncomfortable with the intricate positions that glued them together.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2013
It was just after noon Saturday and a large blue-crab-mobile was drifting out into the harbor with four students from Arbutus Middle School aboard and unable to steer. The problem? A thrown sock puppet that had damaged their controls. The absurd moment captured the spirit of the annual Kinetic Sculpture Race, now in its 15th year, even down to the puppet as the source of mischief — carrying one is a requirement of the competition. School principal Michelle Feeney watched anxiously from a pier at Canton Waterfront Park as a pair of kayakers paddled out to tow the middle-schoolers back to shore, so they could continue on their way. "All they care about is who threw the sock puppet," Feeney said.
EXPLORE
By Jennifer Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun Media Group | March 20, 2013
Mobility, stability and agility are the targets inside the new Kinetics System room at Colosseum Gym in Columbia. Everyone from power-lifters to post-rehab patients can work with trainers to reach their goals, according to trainer Vic Selvaggi. Added in summer 2012 as part of a reconfiguration and expansion of the gym, the Kinetics System room houses specialized pneumatic equipment that trainers use to assess clients' abilities and form before developing a fitness regimen. The goal is to imporve form and functional movement before moving on to weight training, or as Selvaggi puts it, "movement before muscles.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Saturday is the day Fifi looks forward to every year. Fifi is the American Visionary Art Museum 's giant pink poodle-with-wheels, who once a year ventures outside to take part in what is clearly Baltimore's funkiest annual event, the Kinetic Sculpture Race . This year, some 36 land- and seaworthy vehicles, all strictly people-powered, will be taking part in the 15-mile race over land, sea, mud and sand. Like Fifi, some are designed to resemble animals; one of last year's crowd favorites was a hookah-smoking caterpillar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2010
The Columbia Festival of the Arts begins this weekend with free entertainment at LakeFest, an event featuring music, crafts, demonstrations and a parade of moving artwork that's bound to make spectators whip out their cell phone cameras. Conrad Bladey of North Linthicum is participating in LakeFest's 7th Annual Kinetic Art Parade with an entry that he calls "The Fall of Adam and Eve," complete with mannequins perched atop an elaborately decorated 1994 GMC Sierra. "You have to picture many, many people smiling, when all you are doing is driving a car," said Bladey, who is joining the parade for the fifth time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
Each year, contestants in the Kinetic Sculpture Race are required to write a short summary of the amphibious mechanical creatures they plan to build. These descriptions are short stories in miniature, frequently poignant and deceptively profound. Just kidding. But, the synopses are amusing. Here are some of our favorites from this year: •Carver Cobra II: "The last Cobra drowned during water entry at Canton. This one has had swimming lessons." •Going to Hell: "Fire, Brimstone, Devils, Oh My!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
As he has for the past nine years, sculptor David Hess will take to the water tomorrow with his Personal, Long-range, All-terrain Yacht, Proven UnSafe — or, for short, the Platypus. Hess is devoutly hoping not to repeat last year's debacle in the Kinetic Sculpture Race, when his crew very nearly mutinied. Not that anyone was forced to walk the bill … er, plank. But under race rules, all the machines must be set in motion by human power alone. And when a team is trying to propel a 13-foot-tall, 26-foot long bird, weighing 3,800 pounds, on land, through the mud and in water — and all without the benefit of a motor — the galley slaves can get a mite tetchy.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | June 30, 1991
Alvin Mayes, a member of the dance faculty of the University of Maryland, College Park, has been named artistic director of the Kinetics Dance Theatre. He succeeds Dorothy Fried, artistic director of the company since its founding in 1984, who will assume the position of executive director on July 4.Ms. Fried will begin her new position the day after the company's Wednesday 7 p.m. performance at Wilde Lake High School as part of the Columbia Festival of the Arts. The performance will include Ms. Fried's dance-theater piece "State of My Art," described as a satirical reflection of her experiences in forming a non-profit organization.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | June 20, 1996
True to its name, Kinetics is in motion.After 12 years in Ellicott City, Kinetics Dance Theatre's professional company, one of Howard County's prominent dance troupes, will leave its home for Towson and change its name.The 10-member company will move in September from Howard County Center for the Arts to Carver Center for Arts and Technology, a performing arts magnet school in Towson where some of the dancers teach. The company will change its name to the Surge Dance Company.A dance company and a school will remain at Howard County Center for the Arts under the name of Kinetics, but the company and the school will have to find new dancers, a new director and new teachers.
NEWS
January 18, 2008
Kinetics Dance Theatre will present two matinee performances of "A Is for Alice," its danceadaptation of Lewis Carroll's classic tale, at 1:30 p.m. and 3 p.m. Jan. 27 at Howard CountyCenter for the Arts, 8510 High Ridge Road, Ellicott City. Tickets, subsidized by the Howard County Arts Council and Columbia Foundation, are $5. Seating is limited. 410-480-1686, orwww.kineticsdance.org.
FEATURES
By Christina Lee and Christina Lee,Sun Reporter | May 5, 2007
Everyone has heard a theory on why the chicken crossed the road. But a real stumper would be why a 7-foot pink poodle will trek through mud, water and the streets of Baltimore? The answer arrives today in the form of the ninth annual Kinetic Sculpture Race. This year, the American Visionary Art Museum is challenging about 40 Kinetinauts, artists-turned-pilots, to navigate vehicular moving sculptures like the poodle, named "Fifi," through a 15-mile course downtown. The most coveted prize is the Grand East Coast National Mediocre Champion title, given to the sculpture that finishes smack dab in the middle of the race.
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