Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKinetic Sculpture Race
IN THE NEWS

Kinetic Sculpture Race

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
Each year, contestants in the Kinetic Sculpture Race are required to write a short summary of the amphibious mechanical creatures they plan to build. These descriptions are short stories in miniature, frequently poignant and deceptively profound. Just kidding. But, the synopses are amusing. Here are some of our favorites from this year: •Carver Cobra II: "The last Cobra drowned during water entry at Canton. This one has had swimming lessons." •Going to Hell: "Fire, Brimstone, Devils, Oh My!"
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2014
It's the one weekend in Baltimore when people riding large objects through land, water, sand and mud is a common sight. It's time again for American Visionary Art Museum 's Kinetic Sculpture Race. Kinetic veterans Melissa and Phillip Smith will be competing in the race, entering with their sculpture, Chessie, a front-wheel drive, rear steering, reverse trike that resembles a sea monster. "We build it with as little new material as possible and use lots of items we find on the roadside and construction Dumpsters, calling it 'sculpture treasure,'" said Melissa Smith, 35, of Catonsville.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2014
It's the one weekend in Baltimore when people riding large objects through land, water, sand and mud is a common sight. It's time again for American Visionary Art Museum 's Kinetic Sculpture Race. Kinetic veterans Melissa and Phillip Smith will be competing in the race, entering with their sculpture, Chessie, a front-wheel drive, rear steering, reverse trike that resembles a sea monster. "We build it with as little new material as possible and use lots of items we find on the roadside and construction Dumpsters, calling it 'sculpture treasure,'" said Melissa Smith, 35, of Catonsville.
FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
It's not every day a giant pink poodle assists with a marriage proposal. On May 4, Bob Keefer, 38, proposed to his girlfriend of two years, Erin Alexander, 30, at the 15th annual Kinetic Sculpture Race. Unbeknownst to Alexander, Keefer arranged with the American Visionary Art Museum to have Fifi, the museum's famous fluffy poodle, deliver the engagement ring, which was designed with one of Erin's great-grandmother's diamonds. Once Fifi delivered the special package, Keefer took off his shirt to reveal a tuxedo shirt underneath and proposed to Alexander in the middle of the mud pit. "I was completely shocked," says Alexander.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Saturday is the day Fifi looks forward to every year. Fifi is the American Visionary Art Museum 's giant pink poodle-with-wheels, who once a year ventures outside to take part in what is clearly Baltimore's funkiest annual event, the Kinetic Sculpture Race . This year, some 36 land- and seaworthy vehicles, all strictly people-powered, will be taking part in the 15-mile race over land, sea, mud and sand. Like Fifi, some are designed to resemble animals; one of last year's crowd favorites was a hookah-smoking caterpillar.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
As he has for the past nine years, sculptor David Hess will take to the water tomorrow with his Personal, Long-range, All-terrain Yacht, Proven UnSafe — or, for short, the Platypus. Hess is devoutly hoping not to repeat last year's debacle in the Kinetic Sculpture Race, when his crew very nearly mutinied. Not that anyone was forced to walk the bill … er, plank. But under race rules, all the machines must be set in motion by human power alone. And when a team is trying to propel a 13-foot-tall, 26-foot long bird, weighing 3,800 pounds, on land, through the mud and in water — and all without the benefit of a motor — the galley slaves can get a mite tetchy.
FEATURES
By L'Oreal Thompson, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2013
It's not every day a giant pink poodle assists with a marriage proposal. On May 4, Bob Keefer, 38, proposed to his girlfriend of two years, Erin Alexander, 30, at the 15th annual Kinetic Sculpture Race. Unbeknownst to Alexander, Keefer arranged with the American Visionary Art Museum to have Fifi, the museum's famous fluffy poodle, deliver the engagement ring, which was designed with one of Erin's great-grandmother's diamonds. Once Fifi delivered the special package, Keefer took off his shirt to reveal a tuxedo shirt underneath and proposed to Alexander in the middle of the mud pit. "I was completely shocked," says Alexander.
NEWS
May 20, 2010
The suggestion that Mary Carole McCauley makes in her article, "Do arts districts live up to their hype?" (May 14) that there is a "right way" and a "wrong way" to create and maintain arts districts is akin to suggesting that there is a "right way" and a "wrong way" to make art. Success in art districts is quantifiable, but the way it manifests, and the way people envision "success" can be very different. The success of the Station North Arts district is one of the highlights of the arts district designations, but the designation was not responsible for the sudden genesis of an artist community but rather a way to empower a pre-existing set of conditions.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2005
The pedal-powered aquatic racer known as It Cain't - just jumble the letters in "Titanic" - looked the part as it launched at Baltimore harbor yesterday morning. Competing in the seventh annual Kinetic Sculpture Race, its smokestacks had been toppled by the morning downpour and its rain-soaked foamboard exterior hung by threads. When the amphibious craft rolled into the harbor and immediately started to sink, a la The Movie, a clutch of race fans confidently predicted a cinematic end. Insiders knew better.
FEATURES
By Christina Lee and Christina Lee,Sun Reporter | May 5, 2007
Everyone has heard a theory on why the chicken crossed the road. But a real stumper would be why a 7-foot pink poodle will trek through mud, water and the streets of Baltimore? The answer arrives today in the form of the ninth annual Kinetic Sculpture Race. This year, the American Visionary Art Museum is challenging about 40 Kinetinauts, artists-turned-pilots, to navigate vehicular moving sculptures like the poodle, named "Fifi," through a 15-mile course downtown. The most coveted prize is the Grand East Coast National Mediocre Champion title, given to the sculpture that finishes smack dab in the middle of the race.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2011
Saturday is the day Fifi looks forward to every year. Fifi is the American Visionary Art Museum 's giant pink poodle-with-wheels, who once a year ventures outside to take part in what is clearly Baltimore's funkiest annual event, the Kinetic Sculpture Race . This year, some 36 land- and seaworthy vehicles, all strictly people-powered, will be taking part in the 15-mile race over land, sea, mud and sand. Like Fifi, some are designed to resemble animals; one of last year's crowd favorites was a hookah-smoking caterpillar.
NEWS
May 20, 2010
The suggestion that Mary Carole McCauley makes in her article, "Do arts districts live up to their hype?" (May 14) that there is a "right way" and a "wrong way" to create and maintain arts districts is akin to suggesting that there is a "right way" and a "wrong way" to make art. Success in art districts is quantifiable, but the way it manifests, and the way people envision "success" can be very different. The success of the Station North Arts district is one of the highlights of the arts district designations, but the designation was not responsible for the sudden genesis of an artist community but rather a way to empower a pre-existing set of conditions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
Each year, contestants in the Kinetic Sculpture Race are required to write a short summary of the amphibious mechanical creatures they plan to build. These descriptions are short stories in miniature, frequently poignant and deceptively profound. Just kidding. But, the synopses are amusing. Here are some of our favorites from this year: •Carver Cobra II: "The last Cobra drowned during water entry at Canton. This one has had swimming lessons." •Going to Hell: "Fire, Brimstone, Devils, Oh My!"
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2010
As he has for the past nine years, sculptor David Hess will take to the water tomorrow with his Personal, Long-range, All-terrain Yacht, Proven UnSafe — or, for short, the Platypus. Hess is devoutly hoping not to repeat last year's debacle in the Kinetic Sculpture Race, when his crew very nearly mutinied. Not that anyone was forced to walk the bill … er, plank. But under race rules, all the machines must be set in motion by human power alone. And when a team is trying to propel a 13-foot-tall, 26-foot long bird, weighing 3,800 pounds, on land, through the mud and in water — and all without the benefit of a motor — the galley slaves can get a mite tetchy.
FEATURES
By Christina Lee and Christina Lee,Sun Reporter | May 5, 2007
Everyone has heard a theory on why the chicken crossed the road. But a real stumper would be why a 7-foot pink poodle will trek through mud, water and the streets of Baltimore? The answer arrives today in the form of the ninth annual Kinetic Sculpture Race. This year, the American Visionary Art Museum is challenging about 40 Kinetinauts, artists-turned-pilots, to navigate vehicular moving sculptures like the poodle, named "Fifi," through a 15-mile course downtown. The most coveted prize is the Grand East Coast National Mediocre Champion title, given to the sculpture that finishes smack dab in the middle of the race.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
If you happened to see a 15-foot-tall Indian elephant carrying Gandhi near the Inner Harbor yesterday, you weren't hallucinating. It was part of the eighth annual American Visionary Art Museum's Kinetic Sculpture Race, which features pedal-powered sculptures and has become a Baltimore tradition. The term "race" applies loosely, as the most-coveted prize is for the entrant that finishes in the middle of the pack. The course stretched 15 miles, from the museum, into the Baltimore harbor for a brief nautical leg, to Patterson Park for obstacle courses and back to the museum.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
If everything works the way it's supposed to, the human-powered, amphibious sculpture will withstand a 15-mile trek across the streets of Baltimore and stay afloat when it hits the waters of the Inner Harbor. Holly Weinschenk, 10, has her fingers crossed. "Our sculpture is better this year," said the Eldersburg Elementary fifth-grader. "Last year's sculpture had more plaster and was heavier. It was raining so hard last year during the race, and that weighed [the sculpture] down." As Denise Ovelgone - the art teacher who runs the school's art club and organizes the children's participation in the annual Baltimore Kinetic Sculpture Race - puts it, the project is the ultimate "sink or float" lesson.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anna Kaplan and Anna Kaplan,SUN STAFF | April 24, 2003
There's nothing like walking a dog in the park on a Saturday afternoon to brighten one's day, right? So to increase the day-brightening quotient, would it help to make the dog a 14-foot-high pink poodle named Fifi and the walk in the park a 15-mile race through the mud and water of Baltimore? Of course, Fifi is not the only participant in the fifth annual East Coast National Kinetic Sculpture Race this Saturday, held by the American Visionary Art Museum. However, she, a 14-foot-high royal elephant named Bumpo, a 15-foot-high frog and a 10-foot-high Victorian teapot have the hometown advantage as they compete with other creatures from as far as Chicago.
NEWS
By GINA DAVIS and GINA DAVIS,SUN REPORTER | February 5, 2006
If everything works the way it's supposed to, the human-powered, amphibious sculpture will withstand a 15-mile trek across the streets of Baltimore and stay afloat when it hits the waters of the Inner Harbor. Holly Weinschenk, 10, has her fingers crossed. "Our sculpture is better this year," said the Eldersburg Elementary fifth-grader. "Last year's sculpture had more plaster and was heavier. It was raining so hard last year during the race, and that weighed [the sculpture] down." As Denise Ovelgone - the art teacher who runs the school's art club and organizes the children's participation in the annual Baltimore Kinetic Sculpture Race - puts it, the project is the ultimate "sink or float" lesson.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2005
The pedal-powered aquatic racer known as It Cain't - just jumble the letters in "Titanic" - looked the part as it launched at Baltimore harbor yesterday morning. Competing in the seventh annual Kinetic Sculpture Race, its smokestacks had been toppled by the morning downpour and its rain-soaked foamboard exterior hung by threads. When the amphibious craft rolled into the harbor and immediately started to sink, a la The Movie, a clutch of race fans confidently predicted a cinematic end. Insiders knew better.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.