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NEWS
July 24, 2013
I was saddened to read about the death of Lary Lewman. His obituaries said he was known for having been "Pete the Pirate" on Baltimore TV in the 1960s and later as a successful voice-over artist on political commercials. I will remember him for an act of great kindness. Thirteen years ago, I was looking for someone to build a wheelchair ramp for a friend, a young Salvadoran immigrant who had been shot in Long Reach during a robbery attempt and left paralyzed. The young man wanted to keep working but couldn't leave his family's house unless someone carried him down the steps.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2014
A one-of-a-kind oboe belonging to a musician with the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra was reportedly stolen outside a Montreal hotel Tuesday morning. With the BSO season starting in less than a month, she's anxious to get it back. “We all are very wedded to these instruments,” said Katherine Needleman, principal oboist for the BSO. “It's very special to me. It's the only one like it.” Needleman said the oboe was a prototype, made by Yamaha while she was working with the company in developing a new model.
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NEWS
December 13, 2013
It was the night of a monumental occasion and people were piling into Mount Vernon Place to watch the 43rd annual lighting of the Washington Monument. I was there with six fine young people from Baltimore. Although they had lived in the city all their lives, they had never attended a monument lighting until we started going together a few years ago. Since then, we have attended every one, and it has become one of our holiday traditions. We were pressed between many people and standing on tiptoe to see the tap-dancing Santas from the Baltimore School for the Arts.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
This week, Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon ordered state troopers to take over responsibility for maintaining order in the St. Louis suburb of Ferguson, following several days of unrest sparked by the killing of an unarmed black teenager by a local police officer. Mr. Nixon waited far too long to bring in the state Highway Patrol to calm the situation, but he was absolutely correct in his judgment that local authorities weren't up to the job and were actually making matters worse. Had police there exhibited the restraint shown by Baltimore officers on Thursday, when a peaceful crowd rallied near City Hall to support Ferguson's residents with a moment of silence, it's likely things never would have got to a point where the governor had to intervene.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | November 11, 2009
T here are some things we will never understand. Death, for one. I overheard a woman in the drugstore say, "He went in to the hospital yesterday and he was eating his supper and then he fell asleep and then he died. I don't get it." She didn't seem grief-stricken, just uncomprehending. (Why did it have to happen now?) The paranoia that has seized the Republican Party is beyond my understanding. So is the physics of cord entanglement: how two power cords set separately in a briefcase become so complexly intertwined in only a few hours.
EXPLORE
August 7, 2013
I would like to thank the generous lady at the Laurel Regional Hospital. On Saturday, June 29, my daughter was in the hospital and desperately wanted to watch television. The cafeteria and gift shop were closed and I needed exact change ($8) to insert in the machine to get a card for TV in the room. I was at the front desk asking everyone if they had change. A visitor gave me $8 and I gave her a $20 bill. While I was inserting the money in the machine she slipped the $20 in my bag. She was too generous and I don't know how to thank her. Betty Frizzell Laurel
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 19, 2011
As readers of this column know, I was recently the victim of a random act of kindness. An unidentified mensch in a vehicle ahead of mine paid my $5 toll at the Perryville booths on Interstate-95. (Some days it pays to leave your E-ZPass at home.) I reported feeling odd about the gesture, wondering what the point was. Several readers - more than I had anticipated - understood my reaction; they agreed that random generosity doesn't seem nearly as meaningful without the giver of the gift knowing who the receiver is, if not by name then at least by need.
NEWS
May 3, 2010
There are many headline stories that can get your readers attention, but what happened in Baltimore last weekend to a group of teenagers needs to be told, if for no other reason than to urge us all to see the good that can happen in Charm City. On April 24, a group of eight teenagers on their way to their senior prom at M&T Bank Stadium decided to begin their evening with dinner at the Rusty Scupper at the Inner Harbor. All dressed in gowns and tuxedos, it was an evening they vowed never to forget, and truly they won't.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2013
This column begins with Jane Austen, the English author of corseted drawing room romances who wrote anonymously and in secret out of a sense of propriety. A woman in Regency England simply did not bring public attention to herself. Thanks, at least in part, to a petition campaign by feminist blogger Caroline Criado-Perez, Austen's face will appear on British paper money beginning in 2017, only the third woman to be so honored. The others are the Queen, of course, and prison reformer Elizabeth Fry, who is being rotated out in favor of Winston Churchill.
FEATURES
By Allison Brickell, For The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2014
One night in mid-January, Jessica Watson couldn't sleep. Her mind wouldn't stop running. Then, she had an idea. "I just literally thought to myself that we all need to be kinder to each other," said Watson, 30, who runs her own design consulting studio in Baltimore. "These are the things that keep me up at night. " Watson wished there were a way people could more intentionally perform acts of kindness. So she started 28 Days of Kindness, a global initiative meant to promote the awareness of doing good deeds for others throughout February.
NEWS
July 29, 2014
Chicago's 2008 privatization of its municipal parking assets is widely considered to be a colossal boondoggle. Los Angeles considered selling off a few of its parking garages earlier this decade but scrapped the idea after it became clear that the deal wouldn't be nearly as good as initially advertised. Pittsburgh's city council killed a parking privatization deal in 2010 amid concerns about hidden costs in the proposed contract. In 2013, Cincinnati signed a deal to privatize its parking, but then voters rebelled, electing an anti-privatization mayor and city council, who promptly killed the plan.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2014
It's one of those scenarios that would be hard to believe in a movie.  As John Waters embarked on the cross-country hitchhiking trip that is memorialized in his recently published book, "Carsick," a 20-year-old Tea Party-affiliated legislator from Frederick County offered him a ride.  And, to make it all the more cinematic, the Bible-thumping college student and the "Pope of Trash" hit it off.  " We don't see eye to eye on a lot of...
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 9, 2014
As President Barack Obama contemplates November's congressional elections, the odds are they may produce Republican majorities in both the House and Senate. That would likely mean more of the same legislative frustration that has met his presidency to date. Forewarned by his first term, the president during his second has been relying more on his executive powers to advance his own key objectives. He has told ranking White House aides to explore ways to move parts of his own agenda without recourse to Congress.
SPORTS
By Trevor Hass and The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Stewart Elliott chuckled when he was asked the question. Why is winning the Triple Crown so difficult? Elliott, Smarty Jones' jockey in 2004, rattled off a laundry list of reasons why no horse has captured the sport's most prestigious honor since 1978. You need an adaptable horse - one who can adjust to the longer distance at the Belmont Stakes. A horse that can handle running three races in five weeks. One that can handle the hubbub and not get flustered. And a little bit of luck.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | June 5, 2014
Seventy years ago this morning, Bill Swanner crawled through hell. It was still dark when the 19-year-old infantryman joined the more than 150,000 Allied soldiers making the secretive passage out of England for Normandy. Dawn was breaking when he dropped into the water short of Omaha Beach. Now he was on the sand, in the smoke, crawling past the mines and through the corpses, a 50-pound water-cooled machine gun in his hands, pushing through withering German fire to get to the hedgerows beyond the beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2014
UPDATE, 5/20: Part 2 of this landmark documentary airs tonight at 10 on MPT, and it is not to be missed. From Verizon being ordered to hand over phone records of its customers, to James Clapper, director of national intelligence, lying to Congress about it, this hour of TV will make you think long and hard about what this nation has become under President Obama, thanks to his unwillingness to rein in the out-of-control NSA President Bush...
NEWS
September 20, 2013
Last week I took my father, who is 102 years old, to Syle's Barber Shop for his monthly haircut as I have done for the past five years. The month before I could not get his wheelchair up the two steps into the shop so Mark Slye cut his hair outside in front of the shop. When we arrived last week, Mark met us at the door and informed us he had built a special ramp so Dad could get into the shop. I just wanted to share to people in Laurel what a kind gesture and much-appreciated kindness this was. Betty Fulton West Laurel
NEWS
Ruswv13@gmail.com | October 29, 2013
Recent tragic incidents of school violence continue to place the issues of bullying, cyber bullying and school safety at the top of nearly every education agenda around the country. Towson-area schools and organizations are establishing environments where kindness, wellness, and self-respect are pillars of their respective institutions. West Towson Elementary School has established a Character Crew comprising five fifth-grade students who work as a team to brainstorm and collaborate on ways to define and identify positive behavior traits and practices.
NEWS
May 15, 2014
It's Preakness Week in Baltimore, which is only slightly more sober than a New Orleans Mardi Gras, more tradition-filled than the Little League World Series and definitely more diverse than the Masters Tournament. It's the city's time to shine, and no amount of clouds or rain are going to dampen the celebration. A round of black-eyed Susans, please, for the guest of honor this year who can likely be found over at Pimlico Race Course 's Stall 40 where the Kentucky Derby winner is always housed.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2014
Ron Sanchez's roots in horse racing go deep into his childhood in Caracas, Venezuela, where his maternal grandmother took him to the races every weekend at La Rinconada, the country's largest and oldest track. "I was five years old and we'd walk all the way to the track, it's like two miles," Sanchez recalled Monday at Pimlico. "I fall in love [with horse racing]. Once you get here [to the race track], it's impossible to get out. " Though Sanchez also dreamed of becoming a major league baseball player - he was a member of the Venezuelan national team in his late teens and said he "almost signed" a pro contract - the love of racing never left.
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