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By Tricia Bishop | June 15, 2000
John Taylor has a message. In fact, he has many messages, and his alter ego, KinderMan - dressed in bow tie, red suspenders and bowler hat - is the means of delivery. "We teach through rhymes and raps I've created," says Taylor, host of the Emmy Award-winning children's show "KinderTime," which runs on ABC Saturday mornings at 8. Taylor also travels the country preaching positive thoughts to children and families using the arts as his tools. Shows such as "KinderCise" promote learning through movement, using chants and dances to stimulate the mind.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
After convincing his mostly preschool audience to chant, "Dance, Kinderman, dance" a few times, John Taylor pretended to timidly oblige. But he cleverly surprised his young spectators when he flamboyantly cocked his right hip and unleashed a sample of the flashy footwork and smooth moves that long ago earned him the title of Disco King. The exuberant 2- to 6-year-olds screamed their approval, smitten by the mischievous leader with the wide grin and calming voice as he led the church school's students and staff through 45 minutes of learning wrapped up in movement and song.
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NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2012
After convincing his mostly preschool audience to chant, "Dance, Kinderman, dance" a few times, John Taylor pretended to timidly oblige. But he cleverly surprised his young spectators when he flamboyantly cocked his right hip and unleashed a sample of the flashy footwork and smooth moves that long ago earned him the title of Disco King. The exuberant 2- to 6-year-olds screamed their approval, smitten by the mischievous leader with the wide grin and calming voice as he led the church school's students and staff through 45 minutes of learning wrapped up in movement and song.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff | September 11, 2005
You know there is something different about this children's entertainer -- something besides the fact that he is pushing 70 -- when the Kinderman opens the act he's been perfecting for more than two decades. "We're gonna have a good time. We're gonna disturb the peace," he sings to the bright tones of a Casio keyboard as toddlers, preschoolers and parents sway before him. "And if we have too much fun, they're going to call the po-lice!" No matter how many times John "Kinderman" Taylor intones his signature line with its unique Baltimore pronunciation -- at birthday parties and malls, in senior centers and classrooms -- it never fails to draw a laugh.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
The Kinderman waits for about 200 kids to plant their bottoms on their puffy, nylon jackets on the floor of a converted barn in Columbia.For now, they keep their distance from the big man in the black derby, suspenders, high-tops and cummerbund. But they can't stop staring at this cross between Raffi and Don King."HELLO, I'M THE KINDERMAN," John Taylor announces, as a drum machine beats throughout his 45-minute show. He sings, "I'm very glad I came today, I'm very glad I came."Then he moves his body, an apparatus victimized by hotel food but still graceful.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,Sun Staff | September 11, 2005
You know there is something different about this children's entertainer -- something besides the fact that he is pushing 70 -- when the Kinderman opens the act he's been perfecting for more than two decades. "We're gonna have a good time. We're gonna disturb the peace," he sings to the bright tones of a Casio keyboard as toddlers, preschoolers and parents sway before him. "And if we have too much fun, they're going to call the po-lice!" No matter how many times John "Kinderman" Taylor intones his signature line with its unique Baltimore pronunciation -- at birthday parties and malls, in senior centers and classrooms -- it never fails to draw a laugh.
NEWS
By Nancy Knisley and Nancy Knisley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 27, 1998
Barely minutes into John "The Kinderman" Taylor's show at Baltimore County's Catonsville library branch, children in the audience are under his spell. They sway to the rhythm, clap to the beat, sing along and repeat the rhymes, and imitate his movements.The more inhibited adults are hard pressed to keep still in another successful performance by one of Baltimore's most popular children's entertainers.Parents who wonder if the reading they do with their children has any long-term effects only have to hear Kinderman's story.
FEATURES
August 15, 1992
The second annual Maryland Kids Convention will be held today and tomorrow at Towson State University. Sponsored by the Governor's Office for Children, Youth and Families and the Maryland State Department of Education, the Kids Convention will feature live entertainment, art activities, storytelling, a hands-on science arcade and many other activities.The event will be held in the Towson Center from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days. Admission is $2.50 per person. Family tickets are available for $7. Children younger than 3 are admitted free.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1991
The two-day Kids' Convention at the Towson Center tomorrow and Sunday includes creative learning experiences in art, science and music along with entertainment for the entire family. Other activities include a Youth Speakout, in which teens 15-18 can voice their opinions on a variety of subjects. Admission is $2 per person (children under 3 are free) or $5 per family. Call 225-4160 for information. Below is the entertainment lineup.SATURDAY10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. -- Maryland Sings, Grand Opening12:15 p.m. -- Tom Dougherty (clown/juggler)
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | October 29, 1992
Nearly every day is Halloween for John Taylor. As the Kinderman, a be-bopping teacher and friend to children, he wears high-tops and suspenders the way other guys don suits and ties. It's no longer his costume. "It's just plain clothes," Mr. Taylor, 56, says.As "The Pied Piper of Dance," he gets little time to relax in his Columbia home, traveling as least twice a week to schools, workshops and conferences around the country. Rest assured, he says, his bow ties follow him wherever he goes.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 18, 2002
THIS IS Preakness Week, and in keeping with tradition, the town is going slightly loony. How else do you explain John "Kinderman" Taylor, that normally kindhearted children's entertainer, stalking my Sun colleague, Gregory Kane, with a crab hammer? Or how do you account for Tarik Walker, the muscular forward of the Baltimore Blast soccer team, sounding like a hit man from The Godfather as he advocates "straight fear" as the way to get things done. What other explanation could there be for the fact that some hooting members of the crowd gathered at the Arcade in Lexington Market to watch the 12th Annual Crab Derby would accuse little old me, a model of propriety, of cheating?
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN FILM CRITICS | September 22, 2000
Director William Friedkin's "The Exorcist," hits theaters today, with improved sound and 11 minutes of footage trimmed from its original 1973 release. And while the film has lost little of its psyche-jarring impact - there's a reason it frequently turns up atop lists of the most frightening movies ever made - this new, 132-minute version proves that restored scenes make for fine curiosities, but rarely add much to the movie. Of the scenes that have been restored, only one didn't deserve to be cut - the infamous spider-walk scene, in which Linda Blair's Regan, the little girl harboring a demon, scurries down a flight of stairs on all fours, running backward, with her hands and feet behind her back.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 6, 2000
IT'S ANOTHER example of life coming full circle. Beginning Monday, John "Kinderman" Taylor, who swears that "disco is not dead," will teach ballroom and disco dancing lessons at Slayton House. Taylor, 64, stars in the children's television program "It's Kindertime," which airs Saturday mornings on WMAR-TV (Channel 2). Next year, he hopes to gain national attention through syndication of his show. "I want to get to a point where people know me, and I can teach techniques for movement and music and relaxing and leaving love with the children," Taylor said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | June 15, 2000
John Taylor has a message. In fact, he has many messages, and his alter ego, KinderMan - dressed in bow tie, red suspenders and bowler hat - is the means of delivery. "We teach through rhymes and raps I've created," says Taylor, host of the Emmy Award-winning children's show "KinderTime," which runs on ABC Saturday mornings at 8. Taylor also travels the country preaching positive thoughts to children and families using the arts as his tools. Shows such as "KinderCise" promote learning through movement, using chants and dances to stimulate the mind.
NEWS
By Nancy Knisley and Nancy Knisley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 27, 1998
Barely minutes into John "The Kinderman" Taylor's show at Baltimore County's Catonsville library branch, children in the audience are under his spell. They sway to the rhythm, clap to the beat, sing along and repeat the rhymes, and imitate his movements.The more inhibited adults are hard pressed to keep still in another successful performance by one of Baltimore's most popular children's entertainers.Parents who wonder if the reading they do with their children has any long-term effects only have to hear Kinderman's story.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff Writer | January 6, 1995
The Kinderman waits for about 200 kids to plant their bottoms on their puffy, nylon jackets on the floor of a converted barn in Columbia.For now, they keep their distance from the big man in the black derby, suspenders, high-tops and cummerbund. But they can't stop staring at this cross between Raffi and Don King."HELLO, I'M THE KINDERMAN," John Taylor announces, as a drum machine beats throughout his 45-minute show. He sings, "I'm very glad I came today, I'm very glad I came."Then he moves his body, an apparatus victimized by hotel food but still graceful.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 18, 2002
THIS IS Preakness Week, and in keeping with tradition, the town is going slightly loony. How else do you explain John "Kinderman" Taylor, that normally kindhearted children's entertainer, stalking my Sun colleague, Gregory Kane, with a crab hammer? Or how do you account for Tarik Walker, the muscular forward of the Baltimore Blast soccer team, sounding like a hit man from The Godfather as he advocates "straight fear" as the way to get things done. What other explanation could there be for the fact that some hooting members of the crowd gathered at the Arcade in Lexington Market to watch the 12th Annual Crab Derby would accuse little old me, a model of propriety, of cheating?
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 6, 2000
IT'S ANOTHER example of life coming full circle. Beginning Monday, John "Kinderman" Taylor, who swears that "disco is not dead," will teach ballroom and disco dancing lessons at Slayton House. Taylor, 64, stars in the children's television program "It's Kindertime," which airs Saturday mornings on WMAR-TV (Channel 2). Next year, he hopes to gain national attention through syndication of his show. "I want to get to a point where people know me, and I can teach techniques for movement and music and relaxing and leaving love with the children," Taylor said.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | October 29, 1992
Nearly every day is Halloween for John Taylor. As the Kinderman, a be-bopping teacher and friend to children, he wears high-tops and suspenders the way other guys don suits and ties. It's no longer his costume. "It's just plain clothes," Mr. Taylor, 56, says.As "The Pied Piper of Dance," he gets little time to relax in his Columbia home, traveling as least twice a week to schools, workshops and conferences around the country. Rest assured, he says, his bow ties follow him wherever he goes.
FEATURES
August 15, 1992
The second annual Maryland Kids Convention will be held today and tomorrow at Towson State University. Sponsored by the Governor's Office for Children, Youth and Families and the Maryland State Department of Education, the Kids Convention will feature live entertainment, art activities, storytelling, a hands-on science arcade and many other activities.The event will be held in the Towson Center from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. both days. Admission is $2.50 per person. Family tickets are available for $7. Children younger than 3 are admitted free.
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