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Kindergarten Students

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By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | January 8, 1995
Harford school and teachers' union officials expect a new snow policy for Harford County kindergarten students to provide more equitable schedules for the morning-session children on days when schools open two hours late.Morning kindergarten classes previously were canceled when schools had two-hour delayed openings. Now, students will attend school on those days, school officials said last week.The morning classes will start at 11 a.m. and end at 12:30 p.m. Classes for afternoon kindergarten children will be from 1:45 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Regular kindergarten hours are 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.The new plan evolved after the morning children missed 15 days last school year because of weather delays.
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NEWS
Editorial from the Aegis | February 4, 2014
Responding to a proposal set forth in Gov. Martin O'Malley's recent State of the State Address calling for full day pre-kindergarten being offered across Maryland, Harford County interim Superintendent Barbara Canavan offered conditional support for the idea. "Children can do so much more. We need to expose them and give them the opportunity to learn, and the earlier the better," Canavan was quoted as telling the Harford County delegation to the Maryland General Assembly. She then went on to highlight an important aspect of the program that could be all too easy to ignore.
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NEWS
svanessen2@hotmail.com | January 29, 2014
First-grade students at Halstead Academy and Pleasant Plains Elementary schools are eagerly awaiting a field trip to the Meyerhoff in February where they will see a performance of "Carnival of Animals. " Their excitement might be intensified by reports of the kindergartners from both schools who attended a Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performance of "The Snowman" December. The students were able to imagine a winter wonderland come to life in this story about a young boy's magical friendship with a snowman.
NEWS
svanessen2@hotmail.com | January 29, 2014
First-grade students at Halstead Academy and Pleasant Plains Elementary schools are eagerly awaiting a field trip to the Meyerhoff in February where they will see a performance of "Carnival of Animals. " Their excitement might be intensified by reports of the kindergartners from both schools who attended a Baltimore Symphony Orchestra performance of "The Snowman" December. The students were able to imagine a winter wonderland come to life in this story about a young boy's magical friendship with a snowman.
NEWS
Editorial from the Aegis | February 4, 2014
Responding to a proposal set forth in Gov. Martin O'Malley's recent State of the State Address calling for full day pre-kindergarten being offered across Maryland, Harford County interim Superintendent Barbara Canavan offered conditional support for the idea. "Children can do so much more. We need to expose them and give them the opportunity to learn, and the earlier the better," Canavan was quoted as telling the Harford County delegation to the Maryland General Assembly. She then went on to highlight an important aspect of the program that could be all too easy to ignore.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
Harford County kindergarten teachers are furious over the school system's new snow policy designed to minimize the amount of time morning kindergarten students miss because of delayed openings.The school system decided this week that morning kindergarten students would be expected to attend school even when the opening is delayed. In the past, morning kindergarten has been canceled when opening was delayed.The policy was implemented because school officials were forced to cancel morning kindergarten for much of January.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow and Meredith Schlow,Staff Writer Staff Writer Joe Nawrozki contributed to this story | July 15, 1992
Baltimore County officials announced plans today to expand the public school system's kindergarten program in 32 schools and proposed an alternative middle school program that will keep expelled students in classes during regular school hours.Both plans would require adding new teachers.About 2,000 of the county's projected 7,000 kindergarten students will receive all-day instruction, part of new school Superintendent Stuart Berger's plan to improve early childhood education during the 1992-93 school year.
NEWS
By Meredith Schlow | February 6, 1992
Baltimore County officials are painting, moving furniture and, of course, testing for asbestos as they prepare to move Sussex Elementary students to the Rosedale Center starting Monday.The center and Battle Grove Elementary are the new homes chosen for pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students from Sussex, who will be making their third move since asbestos was found at their school Jan. 24.The students were initially sent to Essex United Methodist Church but had to be moved after one day because a visual inspection revealed crumbling asbestos in the upper walls and ceiling tiles of the church's halls and classrooms.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1995
If West County residents can raise $44,000 to build a house for a family that can't afford one, Audrey Spolarich figures her neighbors can raise $20,000 so kindergarten students at Crofton Woods Elementary can enroll in the county's first language immersion program."
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Andrea F. Siegel and Shirley Leung and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Carol L. Bowers contributed to this article | May 19, 1995
Thirty kindergarten students at Crofton Woods Elementary School could learn to read, write and speak French before they learn the same English skills under a pilot program that would begin in September.But some of their parents have questioned starting the program when the school system can't afford computers and other supplies. "Why are we considering implementing a program that will benefit so few students when money is so tight?" asked Richard S. Zipper, a Crofton parent who has gathered 125 signatures protesting the program.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
For those who believe Phelps Luck Elementary School paraeducator Donna Schulze is too outspoken or too uncompromising on issues relating to her profession, she's got a message for you: Too bad. "If I see something, I'm going to speak up," said Schulze, 59, who was named this month as the national Education Support Professional of the Year by the National Education Association. The NEA award comes with a challenge - Schulze will be called upon to advocate for its organization's 484,000 education support professional members, and will travel to state, regional and national conferences as an ambassador.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 28, 2010
Theresa Waddell will never forget the bright boy with troubled eyes who sat in her kindergarten class during her first year as a teacher. She drilled home the message that he could grow to become anything he wanted. He would grow to murder her son. On Monday, Waddell, 59, will stand before a kindergarten class for the first time since her son was killed. In the intervening years, she had continued to teach, but not the very youngest. She struggled with grief, sometimes crying in a classroom corner before returning to the front to use her pain as a teachable moment.
NEWS
By Erin Texeira and Erin Texeira,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1997
Filled with games, naps and snacks, kindergarten was once a place to learn the routines and social skills needed before starting school. Now, kindergarten in Howard County is school.Children must learn how to be students while learning letters, numbers and words. They can write their names within weeks of starting school. Ideally, by year's end, they are beginning to read.The beefed-up kindergarten curriculum is part of a larger effort started this year to get Howard's youngest students -- pre-kindergarten through first grade -- reading fluently as soon as possible, school officials say."
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | March 14, 1996
Carroll County students will spend an extra 50 minutes a day in school for two weeks, April 15-26, to make up time lost to snow and ice this winter.The Carroll Board of Education was not obligated to make up the time, but members voted 3-0 yesterday to use the county's standards rather than the state minimum as the benchmark.By county standards, the schools would have lost 46 hours at the elementary level and 52 hours at the secondary level."That's a lot of lost time, and it's difficult for me to say let's not worry about it," said Superintendent Brian Lockard.
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Shirley Leung,Sun Staff Writer | July 25, 1995
If West County residents can raise $44,000 to build a house for a family that can't afford one, Audrey Spolarich figures her neighbors can raise $20,000 so kindergarten students at Crofton Woods Elementary can enroll in the county's first language immersion program."
NEWS
By Shirley Leung and Andrea F. Siegel and Shirley Leung and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writers Sun staff writer Carol L. Bowers contributed to this article | May 19, 1995
Thirty kindergarten students at Crofton Woods Elementary School could learn to read, write and speak French before they learn the same English skills under a pilot program that would begin in September.But some of their parents have questioned starting the program when the school system can't afford computers and other supplies. "Why are we considering implementing a program that will benefit so few students when money is so tight?" asked Richard S. Zipper, a Crofton parent who has gathered 125 signatures protesting the program.
NEWS
By DIANNE WILLIAMS HAYES and DIANNE WILLIAMS HAYES,Staff writer | November 1, 1990
Until this year, fifth-graders would walk past the kindergarten classroom at West Annapolis without giving a second thought to the 5- and 6-year-olds inside finger painting and learning nursery rhymes.But now, Gavin Hudson, 9, looks forward to monthly visits where he helps his "little buddy," 6-year-old Christopher Matthews, with special projects.Dressed as Count Dracula, the wide-eyed 6-year-old waited anxiously Wednesday for Gavin to finish carving a Halloween pumpkin. Christopher wanted to make sure he would be able to take it home.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | October 23, 1991
School officials say they won't be able to meet the county's requestto trim an additional $5.5 million from their $341 million budget without furloughs, pay cuts or laying off 450 employees.The head ofthe school system's budget office said Monday that an alternate plan, which would put kindergarten students in school only every other day and jeopardize extracurricular activities -- including sports -- byeliminating money for coaches and moderators, would save only $2 million.Budget concerns were on the lips of approximately 150 parents andboard members during a school board meeting Monday night.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,Sun Staff Writer | January 8, 1995
Harford school and teachers' union officials expect a new snow policy for Harford County kindergarten students to provide more equitable schedules for the morning-session children on days when schools open two hours late.Morning kindergarten classes previously were canceled when schools had two-hour delayed openings. Now, students will attend school on those days, school officials said last week.The morning classes will start at 11 a.m. and end at 12:30 p.m. Classes for afternoon kindergarten children will be from 1:45 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Regular kindergarten hours are 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.The new plan evolved after the morning children missed 15 days last school year because of weather delays.
NEWS
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Sun Staff Writer | February 4, 1994
Harford County kindergarten teachers are furious over the school system's new snow policy designed to minimize the amount of time morning kindergarten students miss because of delayed openings.The school system decided this week that morning kindergarten students would be expected to attend school even when the opening is delayed. In the past, morning kindergarten has been canceled when opening was delayed.The policy was implemented because school officials were forced to cancel morning kindergarten for much of January.
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