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By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In his first known direct communication with the leader of North Korea, whom his administration has called a "tyrannical rogue," President Bush sent Kim Jong Il a hand-signed letter reminding him of his commitment to disclose the details of his country's nuclear weapons program by the end of the year, the White House said yesterday. The letter was one in a series Bush dispatched to the participants of the so-called six-party talks aimed at securing the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.
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NEWS
December 19, 2011
The death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves a cloud of uncertainty over North Asia and complicates efforts by the U.S. and its allies to halt the nuclear weapons program that is the principal legacy of his 17-year rule. Kim was a canny and manipulative despot who repeatedly thwarted efforts by more powerful neighbors and adversaries like the United States to stabilize the Korean peninsula. Now that he is gone, the internal power struggle over succession could have unpredictable and perhaps dangerous consequences for the region and the world.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 2004
TOKYO - While reports filter out of North Korea that portraits of the country's leader, Kim Jong Il, have been removed from their honored spots, the official radio and news agency are dropping the honorific "Dear Leader" from their reports on Kim, according to Radiopress, a Japanese news agency that monitors North Korea's radio. Analysts are debating whether Kim is losing his grip on power, or, more likely, quietly orchestrating the downsizing of his own personality cult. As the nation's propaganda chief in the 1970s, Kim paved his way to power by raising his father, Kim Il Sung, to demigod status as founder of the Communist state.
NEWS
By From Sun staff and news services | January 24, 2009
Gillibrand picked to fill Clinton Senate seat 3 ALBANY, N.Y.: Instantly opening a rift among New York Democrats, Rep. Kirsten Gillibrand - a little-known, pro-gun Democrat from a rural Republican district - won appointment yesterday to the Senate seat left vacant by Hillary Clinton. Gov. David Paterson announced his choice a day after presumed front-runner Caroline Kennedy - a woman with considerably more star power but less experience - mysteriously dropped out of contention. Gillibrand, at 42, will be the youngest member of the Senate and one of 17 women in the chamber.
NEWS
December 19, 2011
The death of North Korean leader Kim Jong Il leaves a cloud of uncertainty over North Asia and complicates efforts by the U.S. and its allies to halt the nuclear weapons program that is the principal legacy of his 17-year rule. Kim was a canny and manipulative despot who repeatedly thwarted efforts by more powerful neighbors and adversaries like the United States to stabilize the Korean peninsula. Now that he is gone, the internal power struggle over succession could have unpredictable and perhaps dangerous consequences for the region and the world.
NEWS
July 9, 2006
North Korean response, ordered by the nation's leader, in response to international outrage over North Korea's launching of several missiles over the Sea of Japan. "Our military will continue with missile launch drills. . . .If anyone intends to dispute or add pressure about this, we will have to take stronger physical actions." Kim Jong Il
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 17, 1997
Saddam, Fidel, Kim Jong Il, Muammar. Too many demons Choose one.Jesse Helms is not a one-man army blocking the orderly processes of democratic government. Orrin Hatch is right there with him.Chairman Greenspan assures us that the crisis in Asian financial institutions is no big threat to us unless it gets bigger, which he assures us it will..Obinna Ekezie for governor!Pub Date: 11/17/97
NEWS
June 12, 1998
FEW POLITICIANS carry the moral authority of South Korea's President Kim Dae Jung. He paid his dues in the fight for democracy in his country. Imprisoned, kidnapped, condemned to death, exiled, he won a free election to his country's highest office.So when Kim Dae Jung speaks, Congress should listen. He presented Congress this week with a radically different approach to North Korea than the armed hostility and isolation his country and the United States have jointly mounted since the Korean War armistice of 1953.
NEWS
February 14, 1997
HWANG JANG YOP can shed light on the mysteries of North Korea if he reaches South Korea, and if he is candid in telling all rather than canny in telling what debriefers want to hear. The 24th-ranking member of the North Korean Communist hierarchy walked into the South Korean consulate in Beijing on Wednesday to seek asylum, setting off a firestorm of East Asian diplomacy and political speculation.Meanwhile, he is a problem. China, Communist ally of North Korea in the Korean War of 1950-53, for which no peace treaty has been possible, quietly maintains a two-Korea policy.
NEWS
March 23, 2003
North Korea uses its Korean Central News Agency as a way to deliver propaganda of the government of Kim Jong Il (above) to the world, in English and other languages. The dispatches, which can be found at www.kcna.co.jp, can be somewhat jarring to English speakers. The syntax, and the message, are unusual. Here are two examples from the Web site: U.S. hardline conservatives' remarks under fire PYONGYANG, March 19 (KCNA) - U.S. hardline conservatives were recently reported to have claimed that "it is the misguided behavior for North Korea to threaten the U.S."
NEWS
By James Gerstenzang and James Gerstenzang,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 7, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In his first known direct communication with the leader of North Korea, whom his administration has called a "tyrannical rogue," President Bush sent Kim Jong Il a hand-signed letter reminding him of his commitment to disclose the details of his country's nuclear weapons program by the end of the year, the White House said yesterday. The letter was one in a series Bush dispatched to the participants of the so-called six-party talks aimed at securing the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula.
NEWS
By Mark Magnier and Mark Magnier,Los Angeles Times | October 13, 2006
BEIJING -- China's reaction to North Korea's announcement of a nuclear test was unusually swift and forceful. Within hours Monday, the usually slow to react Beijing government characterized Pyongyang's action as hanran, meaning brazen, a term generally reserved for its worst enemies. By midweek, though, China was sounding more like its old self - calling for dialogue, eschewing confrontation and warning against tough sanctions, even as it redoubled efforts to coax its longtime ally back to the negotiating table.
NEWS
By GRAHAM ALLISON | July 23, 2006
Could North Korea's leader, Kim Jong Il, sell Osama bin Laden a nuclear weapon or the fissile material from which terrorists could make a nuclear bomb? Yes. Since January 2003, while U.S. attention has been consumed by Iraq, North Korea has reprocessed the 8,000 spent fuel rods frozen under the 1994 Agreed Framework to produce enough plutonium for six nuclear weapons. It has restarted its nuclear research reactor at Yongbyon, which is now producing an additional two bombs worth of plutonium annually.
NEWS
July 9, 2006
North Korean response, ordered by the nation's leader, in response to international outrage over North Korea's launching of several missiles over the Sea of Japan. "Our military will continue with missile launch drills. . . .If anyone intends to dispute or add pressure about this, we will have to take stronger physical actions." Kim Jong Il
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 18, 2004
TOKYO - While reports filter out of North Korea that portraits of the country's leader, Kim Jong Il, have been removed from their honored spots, the official radio and news agency are dropping the honorific "Dear Leader" from their reports on Kim, according to Radiopress, a Japanese news agency that monitors North Korea's radio. Analysts are debating whether Kim is losing his grip on power, or, more likely, quietly orchestrating the downsizing of his own personality cult. As the nation's propaganda chief in the 1970s, Kim paved his way to power by raising his father, Kim Il Sung, to demigod status as founder of the Communist state.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 19, 2003
KOSUNG, North Korea - When she is asked the question, Seo Min Hye, a 22-year-old South Korean, giggles, plays with her long, dyed-red hair, fidgets nervously in her trendy ripped blue jeans and stops to think. It's a really tough one, she says: Given the choice of who should rule a reunified Korean Peninsula, would she prefer a pro-American candidate who nearly won the presidency of South Korea in December, or Kim Jong Il, the dictator in Pyongyang? "If I had to pick one, it would be Kim Jong Il," said Seo, one of more than 150 college students from Seoul who took a boat to a North Korean mountain resort this week.
NEWS
October 13, 2000
PEACEFUL coexistence with North Korea, if obtainable, would reduce world tensions, stabilize East Asia and relieve demands on the U.S. defense budget. This is suddenly thinkable after the Washington visit of Jo Myong Rok, deputy to that country's hereditary dictator, Kim Jong Il. The result is an announced reciprocal visit by Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright to Pyongyang, to discuss a possible visitation by President Clinton. This is the ritual of diplomatic rapprochement. It would be a byproduct of North Korea's improving relations with South Korea, since their summit in June.
NEWS
July 23, 2000
THROUGHOUT the Cold War, a main objective of U.S. policy was to divide the two great Communist powers, the Soviet Union and China. The last thing that Washington should want now is to allow the old Communist alliance to be revived against this country's interests. President Vladimir V. Putin made a splashy debut in big power politics by limning such a revival, traveling to the Group of Eight summit on Okinawa via Beijing and Pyongyang. It was skillfully done. Mr. Putin agreed with China's President Jiang Zemin that the U.S. national missile defense project undermines strategic stability and provokes an arms race.
NEWS
March 23, 2003
North Korea uses its Korean Central News Agency as a way to deliver propaganda of the government of Kim Jong Il (above) to the world, in English and other languages. The dispatches, which can be found at www.kcna.co.jp, can be somewhat jarring to English speakers. The syntax, and the message, are unusual. Here are two examples from the Web site: U.S. hardline conservatives' remarks under fire PYONGYANG, March 19 (KCNA) - U.S. hardline conservatives were recently reported to have claimed that "it is the misguided behavior for North Korea to threaten the U.S."
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 23, 2003
BEIJING - The world has one place to turn when trying to decipher what the isolated North Korean regime is thinking during the standoff on the Korean peninsula: Pyongyang's official Korean Central News Agency, KCNA. The only problem is, KCNA propaganda is just about as cryptic as the regime itself. Reading KCNA news releases is like peering into a kaleidoscope of the bizarre. In the past week alone, KCNA has admonished Japan to "mind its own business" in the current confrontation, boasted of the impoverished regime's "powerful economy" and accused the United States of intending to "unleash a nuclear war on the Korean Peninsula at any cost."
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