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Kim Il Sung

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NEWS
June 24, 1994
The self-proclaimed Great Leader of North Korea has scored again. Kim Il Sung, the aged dictator who craves the respect he ill-deserves, has now been embraced by a former American president (Jimmy Carter) and has outwaited and outwitted the current American president (Bill Clinton). This despite the 1950 war he launched that led to the deaths of 35,000 G.I.s, repeated terrorist attacks on South Korea and, lately, his defiance of international rules against the spread of nuclear weapons.Perhaps his triumph was inevitable, given the psychological advantage of a man with a proven willingness to risk war and the slaughter of millions of his compatriots in pursuit of his ambitions.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2011
He was born into freedom in Pusan, South Korea, 60 years ago. Still, Jong C. Jang of Marriottsville spent much of his boyhood hearing his father, Ok Kyun Jang, rhapsodize about growing up in a place about 350 miles to the north. Families were close-knit in the mountainous region around Pyongyang , now the capital of North Korea, Ok Kyun Jang said. Life was stable and opportunity abounded. But that was before 1950, when a Communist army invaded the South, driving hundreds of thousands from their homes and helping give rise to one of the world's most harshly repressive dictatorships.
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NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | July 15, 1994
A panel of Washington TV talkers was snickering about the dig that Sen. Robert Dole took at President Clinton.If you missed it, Dole criticized Clinton for conveying the condolences of the American people to North Korea on the death of dictator Kim Il Sung.Dole suggested that veterans of the Korean War and their families wouldn't be mourning the death of the man who started a war in which so many Americans died.This amused the Washington talkers. Pundit Robert Novak said Dole was having a slow day without any TV appearances, so he pounced on Clinton's condolences to get media attention.
NEWS
By PAUL CARROLL | August 15, 2006
The North Koreans were eager to talk. "Did you see CNN?" was our guide's first question the morning after the missile tests. Knowing that most North Korean citizens are completely cut off from any information about the outside world, I wondered how much our guide herself knew about the tests. As guests in a Pyongyang hotel for foreigners, my companions and I had access to the 24-hour news channels we take for granted at home, and had just learned that the first of seven missiles had been launched into the Sea of Japan.
NEWS
By Stephen W. Linton | July 13, 1994
NORTH KOREANS revered Kim Il Sung as an old guerrilla fighter, a master of strategy.Always a step ahead of his enemies, he would suddenly appear to confound and crush his opponents. His death last week was his last surprise attack.Kim Il Sung is dead and no one knows what to make of it.Few Americans ever learned about North Korea or made friends with its people. Most who tried were denied entrance to Kim's "paradise on earth."Western analysts dismissed him as a "Stalinist dictator."Because the death of a tyrant is an opportunity for progress, by this line of reasoning, his death should be considered a positive development for Korea and for American interests in East Asia.
NEWS
November 28, 1993
North Korea's economy is down to one-tenth of South Korea's, and is barely able to feed its people. North Korea has no friends in or out of the Communist world, though China remains cordial. No wonder North Korea has renounced the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty and prevented International Atomic Energy Agency inspectors from putting new film in surveillance cameras. That is one way to get attention.North Korea has no relations with the United States, although its membership in the U.N. allows back-channel communication.
NEWS
August 1, 1994
American skepticism about a North Korean defector's claim that the Pyongyang regime has already built five nuclear bombs is justified, but only to a degree. It's all a matter of timing. Right now U.S. experts figure North Korea has accumulated only enough plutonium for one or two nuclear explosives. But last month, CIA director James Woolsey warned the stockpile could grow to five bombs later this year. And Sen. John McCain, a hawk on this issue, recalls how much the United States underestimated the extent of Iraq's nuclear program.
NEWS
April 21, 1996
BILATERAL TALKS with North Korea (which the United States pursues while saying it won't) in Berlin this weekend concern Pyongyang's alarming development and sales of missiles. But they could elicit a response to the joint U.S.-South Korean proposal to end the Korean War by replacing its 1953 armistice with a peace treaty.The posture has been that Pyongyang wants to stiff South Korea by negotiating solely with the U.S. Pyongyang's incursions into the Demilitarized Zone are presumably aimed at forcing the U.S. to talk on North Korean terms.
NEWS
By GADY A. EPSTEIN and GADY A. EPSTEIN,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
PYONGYANG, North Korea -- The government escort seemed troubled: Something had not gone according to plan. A small group of visiting Americans had managed to talk with a North Korean whom officials had not selected in advance, a construction worker studying the works of the late Great Leader Kim Il Sung at the national library. After the Americans walked away, the construction worker warned their escort that he would report the official to higher authorities for "protecting" the foreigners as they asked questions.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After weeks of escalating tensions, a North Korean offer relayed through former President Jimmy Carter may provide "an opening" for resolving the standoff over the isolated Communist nation's nuclear program, a senior Clinton administration official said yesterday."
NEWS
By GADY A. EPSTEIN and GADY A. EPSTEIN,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
PYONGYANG, North Korea -- The government escort seemed troubled: Something had not gone according to plan. A small group of visiting Americans had managed to talk with a North Korean whom officials had not selected in advance, a construction worker studying the works of the late Great Leader Kim Il Sung at the national library. After the Americans walked away, the construction worker warned their escort that he would report the official to higher authorities for "protecting" the foreigners as they asked questions.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 18, 2003
MOUNT KUMGANG, North Korea - Here in the idealized version of North Korea, citizens wear new, brightly colored clothes, tour guides appear happy and well-nourished, and everybody worships Kim Jong Il and his father Kim Il Sung, 91 years old this week and still president despite being dead. This seaside mountain resort, developed and operated by the South Korean conglomerate Hyundai Group, has for five years served as one of the few windows on this isolated totalitarian state. And after more than a half-century of isolated existence, North Korea remains a puzzle to outsiders, even when it allows visitors to peer inside.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1998
BEIJING -- In a basement hotel conference room, North and South Korean officials held their first face-to-face talks in almost four years yesterday, breaking a long, hostile silence with friendly overtures.The two five-member teams, each led by a deputy minister, met for two hours in a session that a South Korean negotiator later described as "very sincere and friendly." They said they would meet again today.Although the talks had been prompted by a North Korean request for fertilizer to help ease its food shortage, the agenda of the meeting was far broader.
NEWS
April 21, 1996
BILATERAL TALKS with North Korea (which the United States pursues while saying it won't) in Berlin this weekend concern Pyongyang's alarming development and sales of missiles. But they could elicit a response to the joint U.S.-South Korean proposal to end the Korean War by replacing its 1953 armistice with a peace treaty.The posture has been that Pyongyang wants to stiff South Korea by negotiating solely with the U.S. Pyongyang's incursions into the Demilitarized Zone are presumably aimed at forcing the U.S. to talk on North Korean terms.
NEWS
August 1, 1994
American skepticism about a North Korean defector's claim that the Pyongyang regime has already built five nuclear bombs is justified, but only to a degree. It's all a matter of timing. Right now U.S. experts figure North Korea has accumulated only enough plutonium for one or two nuclear explosives. But last month, CIA director James Woolsey warned the stockpile could grow to five bombs later this year. And Sen. John McCain, a hawk on this issue, recalls how much the United States underestimated the extent of Iraq's nuclear program.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | July 18, 1994
TOKYO -- Providing strong evidence that support for the late North Korean leader Kim Il Sung extends beyond the propaganda machine he created, tens of thousands of Korean residents in Japan turned out yesterday to pay homage to his legacy.Numerous small services were conducted throughout the country, and 10,000 were said to have attended a memorial in Osaka. In Tokyo, 20,000 people ignored a heat wave to converge on a North Korean-affiliated school.Those arriving hours early squeezed into a vast gymnasium while the majority, all elegantly dressed in dark funeral attire and traditional Korean pleated dresses, waited patiently under a scorching midday sun.A young woman collapsed during the 45-minute oration at the beginning of the service -- either from the oppressive temperature, or from sorrow.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 12, 1998
BEIJING -- In a basement hotel conference room, North and South Korean officials held their first face-to-face talks in almost four years yesterday, breaking a long, hostile silence with friendly overtures.The two five-member teams, each led by a deputy minister, met for two hours in a session that a South Korean negotiator later described as "very sincere and friendly." They said they would meet again today.Although the talks had been prompted by a North Korean request for fertilizer to help ease its food shortage, the agenda of the meeting was far broader.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | March 29, 1992
BEIJING -- American evangelist Billy Graham says he is about to become the first foreigner to preach the gospel in North Korea.It is not certain, however, that the globe-trotting Baptist minister will be accorded another rare opportunity: meeting the "Great Leader," as Kim Il Sung, North Korea's iron-fisted dictator, likes to be known.Mr. Graham, 73, leaves here Tuesday on a five-day trip to the world's most secretive bastion of Stalinism, where he plans to deliver sermons at two churches in the capital city of Pyongyang.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | July 15, 1994
A panel of Washington TV talkers was snickering about the dig that Sen. Robert Dole took at President Clinton.If you missed it, Dole criticized Clinton for conveying the condolences of the American people to North Korea on the death of dictator Kim Il Sung.Dole suggested that veterans of the Korean War and their families wouldn't be mourning the death of the man who started a war in which so many Americans died.This amused the Washington talkers. Pundit Robert Novak said Dole was having a slow day without any TV appearances, so he pounced on Clinton's condolences to get media attention.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | July 14, 1994
TOKYO -- What a difference a death makes.Last week, Kim Il Sung, the dictator of North Korea, was reviled here as wily and dangerous. Today, he is receiving the deference accorded to "the Great Leader of North Korea," just as his propaganda machine always said he deserved.This dramatic shift in feelings about an entire nation is evident at the headquarters of the North Korean Residents Association. Not far from the Imperial Palace in central Tokyo, it is North Korea's unofficial embassy and the focal point of 250,000 Koreans living in Japan.
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