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NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 3, 1998
Everything you tell your attorney is in confidence unless you are (a) dead, (b) president or (c) Ken is still working on that.Kim Dae Jung is coming to the wrong place to urge ending sanctions on North Korea. Congress never lifts sanctions.It wasn't only Switzerland but also Sweden, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and Argentina, just like the old movies said.Barry was the real thing. Ronnie just played one on TV.Pub Date: 6/03/98
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NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 19, 2003
KOSUNG, North Korea - When she is asked the question, Seo Min Hye, a 22-year-old South Korean, giggles, plays with her long, dyed-red hair, fidgets nervously in her trendy ripped blue jeans and stops to think. It's a really tough one, she says: Given the choice of who should rule a reunified Korean Peninsula, would she prefer a pro-American candidate who nearly won the presidency of South Korea in December, or Kim Jong Il, the dictator in Pyongyang? "If I had to pick one, it would be Kim Jong Il," said Seo, one of more than 150 college students from Seoul who took a boat to a North Korean mountain resort this week.
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NEWS
June 12, 1998
FEW POLITICIANS carry the moral authority of South Korea's President Kim Dae Jung. He paid his dues in the fight for democracy in his country. Imprisoned, kidnapped, condemned to death, exiled, he won a free election to his country's highest office.So when Kim Dae Jung speaks, Congress should listen. He presented Congress this week with a radically different approach to North Korea than the armed hostility and isolation his country and the United States have jointly mounted since the Korean War armistice of 1953.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 2, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - A special envoy representing South Korea's incoming president plans to go to Washington this week to discuss North Korean nuclear activities amid revelations of possible fresh preparations by North Korea to build nuclear warheads, officials said here yesterday. Chyung Dai Chul, who is advising President-elect Roh Moo Hyun on efforts to bring about an end to the crisis, will confer with Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, and hopes to meet President Bush in an effort to coordinate policy on North Korea, an aide said.
NEWS
June 14, 2000
ONE OF THE world's most modern countries met one of its most backward yesterday, when Kim Jong Il welcomed Kim Dae Jung to Pyongyang. Both are Korea. The meeting holds hope of ending one of the great tragedies remaining from the falling-out of the Allies who won World War II, the open wound separating two halves of one country. North Korea is an orphan satellite of a Soviet Union that no longer exists and a China seeking commerce with South Korea. It is the last forbidden place, isolated and unknown, easy to demonize.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 25, 1992
SEOUL, South Korea -- In a stunning repudiation of President Roh Tae Woo, South Korean voters yesterday deprived the Democratic Liberal Party of a majority in the National Assembly, venting popular discontent over the nation's shaky economy and feuding politicians."
NEWS
February 21, 1998
KIM DAE JUNG, who will be inaugurated Wednesday as South Korea's first president elected from an opposition party, has just been handed a historic mission that might heal his divided nation.The scope of it overshadows the challenge to reverse South Korea's financial emergency and currency collapse, which Mr. Kim has already been supervising as president-elect.Without warning, North Korea's reclusive and obscurantist dictatorship waved an unexpected olive branch Thursday. It came in the form of 70 identical letters to South Korean political leaders, relayed through the Red Cross, calling for dialogue and negotiation with anyone willing to promote coexistence, common interests and unity between the two Koreas.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 25, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - South Korea will dispatch a special envoy to North Korea early next week to discuss the nuclear crisis with the North's leaders, the Seoul government said yesterday. Diplomats said the envoy would also invite North Korean leader Kim Jong Il to hold talks with South Korea's president-elect, Roh Moo Hyun, after Roh takes office Feb. 25. The announcement was the latest in a flurry of diplomatic activity aimed at defusing a crisis that began in October when North Korea admitted it was trying to produce enriched uranium - which can be used for atomic weapons - in violation of an international agreement.
NEWS
March 14, 2001
PRESIDENT BUSH should maintain his predecessor's constructive engagement with North Korea. This would probe the possibilities of arms control aimed at taking that country out of the nuclear bomb and missile business. It would support the efforts at reconciliation made by President Kim Dae Jung of South Korea. Mr. Bush is right to be skeptical of North Korea and to insist that any arms reduction agreement include airtight verification. But it would be wrong to call off talks for fear they might succeed and demolish a rationale for U.S. national missile defense.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 2, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - A special envoy representing South Korea's incoming president plans to go to Washington this week to discuss North Korean nuclear activities amid revelations of possible fresh preparations by North Korea to build nuclear warheads, officials said here yesterday. Chyung Dai Chul, who is advising President-elect Roh Moo Hyun on efforts to bring about an end to the crisis, will confer with Secretary of State Colin L. Powell and Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld, and hopes to meet President Bush in an effort to coordinate policy on North Korea, an aide said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 25, 2003
SEOUL, South Korea - South Korea will dispatch a special envoy to North Korea early next week to discuss the nuclear crisis with the North's leaders, the Seoul government said yesterday. Diplomats said the envoy would also invite North Korean leader Kim Jong Il to hold talks with South Korea's president-elect, Roh Moo Hyun, after Roh takes office Feb. 25. The announcement was the latest in a flurry of diplomatic activity aimed at defusing a crisis that began in October when North Korea admitted it was trying to produce enriched uranium - which can be used for atomic weapons - in violation of an international agreement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 2001
SEOUL, South Korea - The top executive of the World Health Organization said yesterday that North Koreans are dying at a rate more than 40 percent higher than in 1994 when the country was hit by the first of a series of devastating floods and famines. The official, Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland, arriving in Seoul after installing a permanent representative from the organization in the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, said "we have reason to believe" that the annual number of deaths has risen to 9.3 per 100 people from 6.3 per 100 people seven years ago. Brundtland did not offer a breakdown of who in the population was bearing the brunt of disease and starvation, other than to say that "women, children and people who are malnourished" were most vulnerable.
NEWS
March 14, 2001
PRESIDENT BUSH should maintain his predecessor's constructive engagement with North Korea. This would probe the possibilities of arms control aimed at taking that country out of the nuclear bomb and missile business. It would support the efforts at reconciliation made by President Kim Dae Jung of South Korea. Mr. Bush is right to be skeptical of North Korea and to insist that any arms reduction agreement include airtight verification. But it would be wrong to call off talks for fear they might succeed and demolish a rationale for U.S. national missile defense.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 14, 2000
BEIJING -- Kim Dae Jung, who survived jail, death sentences and two assassination attempts before winning the presidency of South Korea three years ago, added a new accolade to his extraordinary career yesterday: the 2000 Nobel Peace Prize. In choosing the 75-year-old sharecropper's son, the Norwegian Nobel Committee cited his work for democracy and human rights at home and in East Asia, as well as his bold efforts to bring peace to the Korean peninsula after a half-century of bitter division.
NEWS
June 14, 2000
ONE OF THE world's most modern countries met one of its most backward yesterday, when Kim Jong Il welcomed Kim Dae Jung to Pyongyang. Both are Korea. The meeting holds hope of ending one of the great tragedies remaining from the falling-out of the Allies who won World War II, the open wound separating two halves of one country. North Korea is an orphan satellite of a Soviet Union that no longer exists and a China seeking commerce with South Korea. It is the last forbidden place, isolated and unknown, easy to demonize.
NEWS
By FRANK LANGFITT and FRANK LANGFITT,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 14, 2000
SEOUL, South Korea - South Koreans may not have known what to expect when their president arrived in dangerous and much-reviled North Korea yesterday, but nothing prepared them for the unprecedented welcome he received at the first summit since the Cold War enemies split more than a half-century ago. In a surprise move that opened the meeting on a hopeful note, North Korea's reclusive leader Kim Jong Il met South Korea's President Kim Dae Jung at Sunan...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 22, 2001
SEOUL, South Korea - The top executive of the World Health Organization said yesterday that North Koreans are dying at a rate more than 40 percent higher than in 1994 when the country was hit by the first of a series of devastating floods and famines. The official, Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland, arriving in Seoul after installing a permanent representative from the organization in the North Korean capital, Pyongyang, said "we have reason to believe" that the annual number of deaths has risen to 9.3 per 100 people from 6.3 per 100 people seven years ago. Brundtland did not offer a breakdown of who in the population was bearing the brunt of disease and starvation, other than to say that "women, children and people who are malnourished" were most vulnerable.
NEWS
By FRANK LANGFITT and FRANK LANGFITT,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 14, 2000
SEOUL, South Korea - South Koreans may not have known what to expect when their president arrived in dangerous and much-reviled North Korea yesterday, but nothing prepared them for the unprecedented welcome he received at the first summit since the Cold War enemies split more than a half-century ago. In a surprise move that opened the meeting on a hopeful note, North Korea's reclusive leader Kim Jong Il met South Korea's President Kim Dae Jung at Sunan...
NEWS
June 12, 1998
FEW POLITICIANS carry the moral authority of South Korea's President Kim Dae Jung. He paid his dues in the fight for democracy in his country. Imprisoned, kidnapped, condemned to death, exiled, he won a free election to his country's highest office.So when Kim Dae Jung speaks, Congress should listen. He presented Congress this week with a radically different approach to North Korea than the armed hostility and isolation his country and the United States have jointly mounted since the Korean War armistice of 1953.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | June 3, 1998
Everything you tell your attorney is in confidence unless you are (a) dead, (b) president or (c) Ken is still working on that.Kim Dae Jung is coming to the wrong place to urge ending sanctions on North Korea. Congress never lifts sanctions.It wasn't only Switzerland but also Sweden, Portugal, Spain, Turkey and Argentina, just like the old movies said.Barry was the real thing. Ronnie just played one on TV.Pub Date: 6/03/98
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