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By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | August 23, 2006
A few years ago, when electricity cost up to 80 percent less after 11 p.m., Suni and Andy Grosko's washer, dryer and other appliances mainly worked the night shift. The Baltimore County couple probably saved thousands of dollars over the years by taking great advantage of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s "time- of-use" plan, which gave big discounts for off-peak kilowatts. But these days, when the price for after-hours juice isn't much lower than that of the daytime product, their appliances are just as likely to be on at lunchtime as at midnight.
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FEATURES
September 18, 2012
Generating a solution to power outages With all the crazy weather lately, I'm worried that a big storm or deep freeze could leave us without power for a few days. Even if the worst doesn't happen, I want to be prepared. I know there are different kinds of generators out there — which type is best for a home? Disasters aside, a generator can be handy even for short outages; nobody likes throwing away spoiled milk! You essentially have two choices: an automatic standby model or a portable gasoline generator.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 1991
The Maryland Public Service Commission decided yesterday to allow a fuel adjustment rate increase for Baltimore Gas & Electric to go into effect Feb. 1.Even though the rate goes into effect the commission will hold hearings on the matter and customers could receive a refund if the commission decides not to grant the full rate increase.The rate increase, which primarily pays for replacement power for the troubled Calvert Cliffs nuclear power station, will add about $1.69 to the bill of a household using 900 kilowatts a month.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
After waffling between "100 percent wind" electricity and a cheaper deal for dirty kilowatts from Washington Gas Energy Services, the Hancock household signed up for the WGES package - 10.8 cents per kilowatt hour for three years. In doing so we'll save about $30 a month this summer, compared with the standard Baltimore Gas & Electric summertime price (12.7 cents), and lesser amounts in ensuing months. We'll be protected if wholesale electricity prices spike back up before 2012. In rejecting the wind deal, we took the advice of environmental groups saying your first move to go green should be reducing energy use, not burning energy as usual and switching sources.
FEATURES
September 18, 2012
Generating a solution to power outages With all the crazy weather lately, I'm worried that a big storm or deep freeze could leave us without power for a few days. Even if the worst doesn't happen, I want to be prepared. I know there are different kinds of generators out there — which type is best for a home? Disasters aside, a generator can be handy even for short outages; nobody likes throwing away spoiled milk! You essentially have two choices: an automatic standby model or a portable gasoline generator.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
After waffling between "100 percent wind" electricity and a cheaper deal for dirty kilowatts from Washington Gas Energy Services, the Hancock household signed up for the WGES package - 10.8 cents per kilowatt hour for three years. In doing so we'll save about $30 a month this summer, compared with the standard Baltimore Gas & Electric summertime price (12.7 cents), and lesser amounts in ensuing months. We'll be protected if wholesale electricity prices spike back up before 2012. In rejecting the wind deal, we took the advice of environmental groups saying your first move to go green should be reducing energy use, not burning energy as usual and switching sources.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | December 2, 2007
If you'd like to match reindeer and kilowatts with all-star holiday yard-trimmers but fear your amateur efforts might black out all the houses on your street, you can find help and inspiration in a new do-it-yourself outdoor decorating guide by Brad Finkle. Holiday Hero: A Man's Manual for Holiday Lighting (Chronicle Books, $9.95) takes the guesswork out of creating memorable Christmas displays. It covers everything from the basics on how to hang lights to planning, installing, troubleshooting and storing your dream display.
NEWS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 3, 1991
Less than three weeks after receiving a $77 million rate increase, Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. has asked the Public Service Commission for a fuel rate adjustment increase that would boost its annual revenues by $48 million.The rate change would increase the residential bill for a customer using 900 kilowatts by $1.69 a month.The new request, filed with the commission yesterday, would primarily meet replacement electricity costs caused by the shutdown of reactors at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear plant in Southern Maryland, which normally provides 50 percent of BG&E's power.
NEWS
By Jerry F. Hough | September 18, 1990
Durham, North Carolina. A SPATE of articles have recently appeared proclaiming the disappearance of the Soviet Union as a significant international factor and maybe even as a functioning society. In the words of one commentator, Soviet-American relations ''are so good these days because the Soviet Union has ceased to be a superpower.''Some liberals seem to be making this point to persuade the American people that improved relations and technology transfer are not dangerous. Conservatives make the point to say that the Soviet Union is not a durable partner and that we must continue to rely on our own military force.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | September 2, 2007
Prospects for real household-electricity deregulation are fading in Maryland, and so are chances they can be revived. The one thing that would bring true deregulation - exposing families to new, volatile price swings and making them shop for kilowatts - is the one thing Maryland won't allow. Burned once by soaring rates and angry consumers, politicians are unlikely to place another finger over the flame. Look for Maryland to imitate Illinois and Virginia by re-regulating - renewing price controls on residential electricity and perhaps putting Baltimore Gas and Electric and other utilities back in the power-plant business.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | December 2, 2007
If you'd like to match reindeer and kilowatts with all-star holiday yard-trimmers but fear your amateur efforts might black out all the houses on your street, you can find help and inspiration in a new do-it-yourself outdoor decorating guide by Brad Finkle. Holiday Hero: A Man's Manual for Holiday Lighting (Chronicle Books, $9.95) takes the guesswork out of creating memorable Christmas displays. It covers everything from the basics on how to hang lights to planning, installing, troubleshooting and storing your dream display.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | September 2, 2007
Prospects for real household-electricity deregulation are fading in Maryland, and so are chances they can be revived. The one thing that would bring true deregulation - exposing families to new, volatile price swings and making them shop for kilowatts - is the one thing Maryland won't allow. Burned once by soaring rates and angry consumers, politicians are unlikely to place another finger over the flame. Look for Maryland to imitate Illinois and Virginia by re-regulating - renewing price controls on residential electricity and perhaps putting Baltimore Gas and Electric and other utilities back in the power-plant business.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | March 25, 2007
Just as the General Assembly planned it last year, the real pain from BGE's electric-rate increase won't hit until June 1 - seven safe months after the election. Unfortunately, your options to do something about it are doubly diminished. You can't raise heck at the voting precinct. And weather worries and regulatory delay have not only reduced the alternatives to Baltimore Gas and Electric's standard electricity product but raised the cost of those that remain. Still, alternatives exist, including new chances to buy "green" kilowatts.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,SUN COLUMNIST | August 23, 2006
A few years ago, when electricity cost up to 80 percent less after 11 p.m., Suni and Andy Grosko's washer, dryer and other appliances mainly worked the night shift. The Baltimore County couple probably saved thousands of dollars over the years by taking great advantage of Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.'s "time- of-use" plan, which gave big discounts for off-peak kilowatts. But these days, when the price for after-hours juice isn't much lower than that of the daytime product, their appliances are just as likely to be on at lunchtime as at midnight.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | May 29, 2001
STANFORD, Calif. -- A reader in Michigan says that he has been living in retirement on $15,000 a year -- about $5,000 from Social Security and about $10,000 from stocks he owns in Southern California Edison. But now that the California government has forced Southern California Edison to sell electricity for less than it paid to buy it, there are no more profits from which to pay dividends, and the value of the company's stock has plummeted. The Michigan retiree is by no means alone. All across the country there are people who have invested their savings in public utilities that supply electricity to Californians.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | November 16, 1992
SOLO: LIFE WITH AN ELECTRIC CAR. Noel Perrin. Norton. 192 pages. $18.95.BACK in 1900, Baltimore banned gasoline automobiles from the roads in the city's parks, decreeing that only electric cars could be driven there "because they were clean and quiet," according to environmentalist, literary scholar and author Noel Perrin."
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | March 25, 2007
Just as the General Assembly planned it last year, the real pain from BGE's electric-rate increase won't hit until June 1 - seven safe months after the election. Unfortunately, your options to do something about it are doubly diminished. You can't raise heck at the voting precinct. And weather worries and regulatory delay have not only reduced the alternatives to Baltimore Gas and Electric's standard electricity product but raised the cost of those that remain. Still, alternatives exist, including new chances to buy "green" kilowatts.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | November 16, 1992
SOLO: LIFE WITH AN ELECTRIC CAR. Noel Perrin. Norton. 192 pages. $18.95.BACK in 1900, Baltimore banned gasoline automobiles from the roads in the city's parks, decreeing that only electric cars could be driven there "because they were clean and quiet," according to environmentalist, literary scholar and author Noel Perrin."
BUSINESS
January 10, 1991
The Maryland Public Service Commission decided yesterday to allow a fuel adjustment rate increase for Baltimore Gas & Electric to go into effect Feb. 1.Even though the rate goes into effect the commission will hold hearings on the matter and customers could receive a refund if the commission decides not to grant the full rate increase.The rate increase, which primarily pays for replacement power for the troubled Calvert Cliffs nuclear power station, will add about $1.69 to the bill of a household using 900 kilowatts a month.
NEWS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | January 3, 1991
Less than three weeks after receiving a $77 million rate increase, Baltimore Gas & Electric Co. has asked the Public Service Commission for a fuel rate adjustment increase that would boost its annual revenues by $48 million.The rate change would increase the residential bill for a customer using 900 kilowatts by $1.69 a month.The new request, filed with the commission yesterday, would primarily meet replacement electricity costs caused by the shutdown of reactors at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear plant in Southern Maryland, which normally provides 50 percent of BG&E's power.
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