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NEWS
February 8, 2007
On February 5, 2007, JAMES A. KILLEN of Catonsville, MD. Beloved husband of Teresa A. Killen (nee Drechsler); loving brother of Anthony Killen, Vincent Killen and Loretta Lindsey. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. Family and friends are invited to call at STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue, Catonsville, MD, on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 P.M. Mass of Christian burial will be held at St. Mark Church, 27 Melvin Avenue, on Friday at 10:00 A.M. Interment at New Cathedral Cemetery.
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NEWS
May 24, 2007
FANNIE LEE CHANEY, 84 Mother of slain civil-rights worker Fannie Lee Chaney, the mother of one of three civil rights workers killed in the "Mississippi Burning" case in 1964, has died, her son said Wednesday. She had lived to see a reputed Klan leader convicted two years ago in the young men's deaths. Ben Chaney confirmed her death from his mother's home in Willingboro, N.J. He said funeral arrangements were pending, and information would be released later. James Chaney, his older brother, was killed June 21, 1964, in central Mississippi's Neshoba County, along with fellow civil rights workers Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman.
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NEWS
March 8, 2006
On February 12, 2006, DOLLIS KILLEN WILLIAMS, beloved mother of William W. Williams and Harriet A. Kerr; mother-in-law of William M. Kerr, II; dear sister of Goldy Ritchie, Philip L. Killen and the late Dolly Bates, Butler Killen, Ivory Killen, Hershel Killen, Eugene Killen and Oma Ashbrook; grandmother of Cynthia Kerr Salmond, William M. Kerr III, Jennifer J. Williams and Jason J. Williams and great-grandmother of Elizabeth P. Salmond and John H.R. Salmond....
NEWS
February 8, 2007
On February 5, 2007, JAMES A. KILLEN of Catonsville, MD. Beloved husband of Teresa A. Killen (nee Drechsler); loving brother of Anthony Killen, Vincent Killen and Loretta Lindsey. He is also survived by several nieces and nephews. Family and friends are invited to call at STERLING-ASHTON-SCHWAB-WITZKE FUNERAL HOME OF CATONSVILLE, INC., 1630 Edmondson Avenue, Catonsville, MD, on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 P.M. Mass of Christian burial will be held at St. Mark Church, 27 Melvin Avenue, on Friday at 10:00 A.M. Interment at New Cathedral Cemetery.
NEWS
September 25, 2004
On September 22, 2004, LILLIAN C. KILLEN, loving wife of 62 years of Vincent de Paul Anthony Killen; devoted mother of Kathy Franey, Sheila Norton and her husband John, cherished "Mom Mom" of Cara Muglia, Heidi Norton and Katie Norton, great grandmother of Stephen Marlin Vincent Muglia. Also survived by her brother Edward Kearns, preceded in death by her parents James P. Kearns and Marie Kearns and loving sister Dorothy Bailey. Relative and friends may call at the family owned AMBROSE FUNERAL HOME, INC., 1328 Sulphur Spring Road, Arbutus on Friday from 7 to 9 P.M. A Mass of Christian burial will be celebrated at St. Benedict's Catholic Church on Saturday at the funeral hour of 10 A.M. Interment to immediately follow at New Cathedral Cemetery.
NEWS
February 23, 2003
On February 20, 2003, BERTHA V. KILLEN (nee Shryock), beloved wife of the late Darrell Killen, devoted mother of Edmond and his wife Janet and Raymond and his wife Darlene, and the late Richard R. Bossert, loving sister of Agnes M. Boyce. Also survived by five grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and one great-great-grandchild. Funeral at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Ave., on Tuesday at 1:30 P.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery. Visiting hours on Monday 3-5 and 7-9 P.M.
NEWS
By John Moreno Gonzales and John Moreno Gonzales,NEWSDAY | June 24, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - His past as a spiritual leader of this town stripped away and replaced with an inmate's jumpsuit, 80-year-old Edgar Ray Killen was sentenced yesterday to the maximum of 60 years for the killing of three civil rights workers in 1964. Judge Marcus Gordon ordered the penalty against the former Ku Klux Klan leader for the deaths of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner. He said Killen was receiving 20 years of punishment for each man. "The three lives should absolutely be respected and treated equally," Gordon said, in a legal principle that is echoed in the principles that the rights workers advocated.
NEWS
By Dahleen Glanton and Dahleen Glanton,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | June 16, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - The long-awaited murder trial of Edgar Ray Killen got under way yesterday with attorneys for both sides acknowledging to a racially diverse jury that the 80-year-old defendant was a member of the Ku Klux Klan when three civil rights workers were killed in 1964. But the difference in the opening statements was that state Attorney General James Hood wants jurors to believe that Killen, a former high-ranking state leader of the white supremacist group, was responsible for seeing that "troublemakers" targeted for "elimination" were murdered.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 10, 2005
A judge sent Edgar Ray Killen, the former Klansman convicted of the 1964 killing of three civil rights workers in Mississippi, back to prison yesterday, saying Killen had deceived the court about his health when he asked to be released on bond. The hearing was called after Killen, who was granted bail after testifying that he had to use a wheelchair, was seen up and walking by sheriff's deputies. "That's incredible to me," the judge, Marcus Gordon, said. "I feel fraud has been committed on this court."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2005
ATLANTA - Mississippi's attorney general has challenged a judge's decision to grant bail to former Ku Klux Klan member Edgar Ray Killen, who was freed from prison Friday, less than two months into his 60-year sentence. Killen was convicted in June of three counts of manslaughter in the 1964 deaths of civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner. In an emergency petition to the state Supreme Court, submitted Monday night, Attorney General Jim Hood argued that Killen, 80, remains a violent and dangerous man. Hood said that a Killen relative made death threats against Circuit Judge Marcus Gordon and that an anonymous caller threatened to bomb the courthouse.
NEWS
March 8, 2006
On February 12, 2006, DOLLIS KILLEN WILLIAMS, beloved mother of William W. Williams and Harriet A. Kerr; mother-in-law of William M. Kerr, II; dear sister of Goldy Ritchie, Philip L. Killen and the late Dolly Bates, Butler Killen, Ivory Killen, Hershel Killen, Eugene Killen and Oma Ashbrook; grandmother of Cynthia Kerr Salmond, William M. Kerr III, Jennifer J. Williams and Jason J. Williams and great-grandmother of Elizabeth P. Salmond and John H.R. Salmond....
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 10, 2005
A judge sent Edgar Ray Killen, the former Klansman convicted of the 1964 killing of three civil rights workers in Mississippi, back to prison yesterday, saying Killen had deceived the court about his health when he asked to be released on bond. The hearing was called after Killen, who was granted bail after testifying that he had to use a wheelchair, was seen up and walking by sheriff's deputies. "That's incredible to me," the judge, Marcus Gordon, said. "I feel fraud has been committed on this court."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 17, 2005
ATLANTA - Mississippi's attorney general has challenged a judge's decision to grant bail to former Ku Klux Klan member Edgar Ray Killen, who was freed from prison Friday, less than two months into his 60-year sentence. Killen was convicted in June of three counts of manslaughter in the 1964 deaths of civil rights workers Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner. In an emergency petition to the state Supreme Court, submitted Monday night, Attorney General Jim Hood argued that Killen, 80, remains a violent and dangerous man. Hood said that a Killen relative made death threats against Circuit Judge Marcus Gordon and that an anonymous caller threatened to bomb the courthouse.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | June 27, 2005
ATLANTA - If your son had been murdered 41 years ago simply for his political activism, would you be willing to forget it after all these years and allow the mastermind of his murder to go free? If your child had been executed by vicious animals and buried anonymously in an earthen dam, would you tell government authorities to let the man who staged his murder off the hook because he's now old? Of course not. Neither did the families of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman or Michael Schwerner.
NEWS
By John Moreno Gonzales and John Moreno Gonzales,NEWSDAY | June 24, 2005
PHILADELPHIA, Miss. - His past as a spiritual leader of this town stripped away and replaced with an inmate's jumpsuit, 80-year-old Edgar Ray Killen was sentenced yesterday to the maximum of 60 years for the killing of three civil rights workers in 1964. Judge Marcus Gordon ordered the penalty against the former Ku Klux Klan leader for the deaths of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner. He said Killen was receiving 20 years of punishment for each man. "The three lives should absolutely be respected and treated equally," Gordon said, in a legal principle that is echoed in the principles that the rights workers advocated.
NEWS
June 22, 2005
IT'S A FORM of poetic justice that Edgar Ray Killen was convicted of manslaughter on the 41st anniversary of the deaths of three civil rights workers in Neshoba County, Miss. That it took the state four decades to seek justice of any kind against Mr. Killen or any of the other alleged Ku Klux Klansmen long known or thought to have been responsible for the killings shows the depth of the racial chasm in Mississippi. But the fact that, however belatedly, the state brought charges and a jury of nine whites and three blacks has found the 80-year-old ailing former preacher culpable in the murders also points to progress made in bridging the divide and the need to continue the process of reconciliation and healing - not only in Mississippi, but across the nation.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 22, 2005
Exactly 41 years after three young civil rights workers were ambushed and killed, a Mississippi jury convicted a one-time Ku Klux Klan leader yesterday in the notorious case that horrified the country but had never before reached a state courtroom. A jury that one day earlier hinted it might have been deadlocked convicted Edgar Ray Killen of manslaughter in the 1964 deaths of the three men. Jurors could have found Killen guilty of murder - that they did not, relatives of the victims said, showed the difficulty even now in seeking justice for brutal civil rights-era violence.
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