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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1991
In the 1990s, investors will have to choose their stocks more carefully then they did in the 1980s, says a top Baltimore investment banker."The '90s are going to be much more difficult," says Robert S. Killebrew Jr., chairman of the investment committee at the Alex. Brown & Sons investment banking firm.Instead of relying on the general upward trend of the market, investors will have to buy stocks of companies with good earnings potential, says Killebrew, who is also a managing director of the 191-year old firm.
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NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2005
GLENELG RESIDENT Allen Derwent has some great baseball memories. Oh, indeed. Did you hear about the time Harmon Killebrew and Bob Allison, one-time Washington Senators stars who moved with that ill-fated team to the Twin Cities in 1960, would some years later torment a rookie on the new, replacement Senators with rats? Oh, yes. Derwent has some memories. He was one of the new Senators' last two batboys, an experience that gave him a lifetime of memories, some of which he shared Saturday with local members of the Society for American Baseball Research at a gathering in an Ellicott City bookstore.
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SPORTS
May 9, 1998
Fastest players to hit 400 home runs in the majors, with name and number of official at-bats:Player .. .. .. .. .. ..ABsMark McGwire .. .. ...4,726Babe Ruth .. .. .. ...4,854Harmon Killebrew .. ..5,300Willie McCovey .. .. .5,751Jimmie Foxx .. .. .. .5,774Mike Schmidt .. .. ...5,790Pub Date: 5/09/98
SPORTS
November 18, 2001
Letting Murray leave is another O's mistake Eddie Murray's departure is another step in the Orioles' relentless drive toward mediocrity. While the Orioles' management and its flacks laud Terry Crowley as being the best batting instructor in baseball, the fact is that the Orioles were the worst-hitting team in the major leagues. Are the Orioles saying that without Mr. Crowley's expertise, the team would be worse than worst? Or are the players accumulated by management just totally inept?
BUSINESS
By Glenn Burkins and Glenn Burkins,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 29, 1991
Hunker down, investors. The 1990s will be a leaner decade for stocks.At least that's the gospel according to Robert S. Killebrew Jr., managing director of Alex. Brown & Sons Inc., a Baltimore-based money-management firm. Mr. Killebrew was in Philadelphia last week to talk about investment strategies with some of the firm's clients. The picture he painted was not rosy."There will be gainers and losers," he said. "But there will not be enough on the table for everyone."To survive the downturn, he said, stick with quality stocks -- those with a history of steady growth.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez | November 12, 1990
Every time the Enoch Pratt Free Library reopens a renovated branch or unveils a new service like the neighborhood homework centers, Pratt Trustee President Robert S. Killebrew Jr. announces in a loud voice: "We want people to wear them out."To achieve that end -- and to convince local government that more library funding is essential if it can be proved that the Pratt is well-used -- Mr. Killebrew and Pratt Director Anna Curry have released the first "performance-based management plan" in the library's 108-year history.
SPORTS
May 6, 1997
Astros: Luis Gonzalez's home run was his first since Sept. 27, a span of 107 at-bats. The starters have worked 72 percent of the innings pitched by the team.Blue Jays: The team has played 56 consecutive errorless innings. Toronto hasn't homered in its past 51 innings.Cardinals: Gary Gaetti was back in the lineup after missing six games with a groin injury, but Brian Jordan (Milford Mill) sat out for the third straight game with a back injury.Pirates: It was the first time the team had been shut out. The bullpen hasn't allowed a run in the past five games, covering a span of 8 2/3 innings.
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | April 10, 1991
By definition, any analysis of tape-measure home runs should be an exact science.No way. Long home runs are the stuff of fable and folklore. We could tell you that Bo Jackson hit one farther than Babe Ruth, but that's like saying George Foreman hits harder than Jack Dempsey or that Julia Roberts is prettier than Mary Pickford.This is not track and field, in which the increments are precise as are the records. Most "tape-measure" shots are never measured. Home runs stretch to new distances as the newsprint yellows and the mind is left to carry a legendary long ball.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1997
With the historic Hayfields farm all but lost to the construction of a golf course and houses, a dozen Baltimore County residents are drawing a new line on development by joining to preserve one of the largest farms in the scenic Worthington Valley.The group has a $2.5 million contract to buy 291-acre Shawan Farms, a rolling tract of cornfields and woodlands that lies just a mile west of Hayfields -- and was up for grabs to developers.In a bid to slow the suburban sprawl that has spilled into the county's rural northern valleys, the group plans to form a nonprofit organization to manage the land and perhaps hold horse races there.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | April 3, 1991
A debate over the fate of a wooded, hilly tract in Catonsville has forced Baltimore County officials to weigh the issue ofconservation vs. costs.At stake is a 13-acre tract just south of Westowne Elementary School on Harlem Lane. The tract is listed as a proposed park in the county's year-old master plan, along with 39 other sites. But the question facing the County Council is whether saving the tract is worth the $1.4 million price tag that the tract's owners, Aurelia and Joseph Loveman, have been offered by a developer who wants to build 80 town houses.
SPORTS
May 9, 1998
Fastest players to hit 400 home runs in the majors, with name and number of official at-bats:Player .. .. .. .. .. ..ABsMark McGwire .. .. ...4,726Babe Ruth .. .. .. ...4,854Harmon Killebrew .. ..5,300Willie McCovey .. .. .5,751Jimmie Foxx .. .. .. .5,774Mike Schmidt .. .. ...5,790Pub Date: 5/09/98
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | July 25, 1997
With the historic Hayfields farm all but lost to the construction of a golf course and houses, a dozen Baltimore County residents are drawing a new line on development by joining to preserve one of the largest farms in the scenic Worthington Valley.The group has a $2.5 million contract to buy 291-acre Shawan Farms, a rolling tract of cornfields and woodlands that lies just a mile west of Hayfields -- and was up for grabs to developers.In a bid to slow the suburban sprawl that has spilled into the county's rural northern valleys, the group plans to form a nonprofit organization to manage the land and perhaps hold horse races there.
SPORTS
May 6, 1997
Astros: Luis Gonzalez's home run was his first since Sept. 27, a span of 107 at-bats. The starters have worked 72 percent of the innings pitched by the team.Blue Jays: The team has played 56 consecutive errorless innings. Toronto hasn't homered in its past 51 innings.Cardinals: Gary Gaetti was back in the lineup after missing six games with a groin injury, but Brian Jordan (Milford Mill) sat out for the third straight game with a back injury.Pirates: It was the first time the team had been shut out. The bullpen hasn't allowed a run in the past five games, covering a span of 8 2/3 innings.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | April 18, 1993
Quick, call Abbott and Costello.Who's on third? Everybody!"It's pretty sad this game wasn't on TV," California third baseman Rene Gonzales said. "You can't describe what happened. It was probably the most ridiculous play I've ever been involved in."We open with Gonzo's comment as a disclaimer. You will be confused by the time you finish reading this. The editors of this newspaper can change as many words as they want. It won't help.Hey, don't blame the messenger.It's the Orioles who transformed a bases-loaded, one-out situation into the Rocky Horror Base-Running Show yesterday.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Evening Sun Staff | December 4, 1991
In the 1990s, investors will have to choose their stocks more carefully then they did in the 1980s, says a top Baltimore investment banker."The '90s are going to be much more difficult," says Robert S. Killebrew Jr., chairman of the investment committee at the Alex. Brown & Sons investment banking firm.Instead of relying on the general upward trend of the market, investors will have to buy stocks of companies with good earnings potential, says Killebrew, who is also a managing director of the 191-year old firm.
BUSINESS
By Glenn Burkins and Glenn Burkins,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 29, 1991
Hunker down, investors. The 1990s will be a leaner decade for stocks.At least that's the gospel according to Robert S. Killebrew Jr., managing director of Alex. Brown & Sons Inc., a Baltimore-based money-management firm. Mr. Killebrew was in Philadelphia last week to talk about investment strategies with some of the firm's clients. The picture he painted was not rosy."There will be gainers and losers," he said. "But there will not be enough on the table for everyone."To survive the downturn, he said, stick with quality stocks -- those with a history of steady growth.
NEWS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | August 24, 2005
GLENELG RESIDENT Allen Derwent has some great baseball memories. Oh, indeed. Did you hear about the time Harmon Killebrew and Bob Allison, one-time Washington Senators stars who moved with that ill-fated team to the Twin Cities in 1960, would some years later torment a rookie on the new, replacement Senators with rats? Oh, yes. Derwent has some memories. He was one of the new Senators' last two batboys, an experience that gave him a lifetime of memories, some of which he shared Saturday with local members of the Society for American Baseball Research at a gathering in an Ellicott City bookstore.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | April 18, 1993
Quick, call Abbott and Costello.Who's on third? Everybody!"It's pretty sad this game wasn't on TV," California third baseman Rene Gonzales said. "You can't describe what happened. It was probably the most ridiculous play I've ever been involved in."We open with Gonzo's comment as a disclaimer. You will be confused by the time you finish reading this. The editors of this newspaper can change as many words as they want. It won't help.Hey, don't blame the messenger.It's the Orioles who transformed a bases-loaded, one-out situation into the Rocky Horror Base-Running Show yesterday.
SPORTS
By Dan Shaughnessy and Dan Shaughnessy,Boston Globe | April 10, 1991
By definition, any analysis of tape-measure home runs should be an exact science.No way. Long home runs are the stuff of fable and folklore. We could tell you that Bo Jackson hit one farther than Babe Ruth, but that's like saying George Foreman hits harder than Jack Dempsey or that Julia Roberts is prettier than Mary Pickford.This is not track and field, in which the increments are precise as are the records. Most "tape-measure" shots are never measured. Home runs stretch to new distances as the newsprint yellows and the mind is left to carry a legendary long ball.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | April 3, 1991
A debate over the fate of a wooded, hilly tract in Catonsville has forced Baltimore County officials to weigh the issue ofconservation vs. costs.At stake is a 13-acre tract just south of Westowne Elementary School on Harlem Lane. The tract is listed as a proposed park in the county's year-old master plan, along with 39 other sites. But the question facing the County Council is whether saving the tract is worth the $1.4 million price tag that the tract's owners, Aurelia and Joseph Loveman, have been offered by a developer who wants to build 80 town houses.
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