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NEWS
June 30, 2007
KIICHI MIYAZAWA, 87 Former Japan prime minister Former Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, who served from 1991 until 1993, died Thursday of natural causes at his home in Tokyo, said Shigeru Muta, an aide to Mr. Miyazawa's lawmaker nephew, Yoichi Miyazawa. The statesman, who was first elected to parliament in 1953, returned to high-profile politics late in life in 1998 when he was named finance minister by then-Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi. He retired in 2003. Despite being at the helm as prime minister during Japan's long-term economic malaise, he was well-regarded as an architect of the government's plan to bail out its debt-laden banking system.
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NEWS
June 30, 2007
KIICHI MIYAZAWA, 87 Former Japan prime minister Former Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, who served from 1991 until 1993, died Thursday of natural causes at his home in Tokyo, said Shigeru Muta, an aide to Mr. Miyazawa's lawmaker nephew, Yoichi Miyazawa. The statesman, who was first elected to parliament in 1953, returned to high-profile politics late in life in 1998 when he was named finance minister by then-Prime Minister Keizo Obuchi. He retired in 2003. Despite being at the helm as prime minister during Japan's long-term economic malaise, he was well-regarded as an architect of the government's plan to bail out its debt-laden banking system.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 22, 1993
TOKYO -- Signs that the Liberal Democratic Party might be losing its political dominance for the first time in four decades roiled Japanese financial markets yesterday.Japanese stocks plunged 3 percent and the dollar jumped against the yen after Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa dissolved the lower house of Parliament, throwing the country's leadership into a crisis that could reshape postwar Japanese politics.The political crisis started Friday night when the lower house of Parliament passed a no-confidence vote against Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, forcing him to dissolve the chamber and call a snap election for July 18. About 50 members of Miyazawa's Liberal Democratic Party defected, raising the possibility that the LDP's four decades of political dominance was over.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | July 17, 1993
OMIYA, Japan -- For decades, millions of Japanese voters have wished they could vote for some conservative party besides the Liberal Democrats, who have governed here since 1955.Tomorrow, they face a bewilderment of riches, not one new alternative, but three. And there are strong indications that it may take another election -- possibly as soon as a year from now -- before the political landscape is settled.For a lot of voters, the sudden wealth of self-proclaimed "reform" choices with conservative inclinations, with the sense that there may be a chance of change at last, is making it hard to decide what to do in an election that could reshape Japan's political structure for the first time in 38 years.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | July 17, 1993
OMIYA, Japan -- For decades, millions of Japanese voters have wished they could vote for some conservative party besides the Liberal Democrats, who have governed here since 1955.Tomorrow, they face a bewilderment of riches, not one new alternative, but three. And there are strong indications that it may take another election -- possibly as soon as a year from now -- before the political landscape is settled.For a lot of voters, the sudden wealth of self-proclaimed "reform" choices with conservative inclinations, with the sense that there may be a chance of change at last, is making it hard to decide what to do in an election that could reshape Japan's political structure for the first time in 38 years.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | April 29, 1993
TOKYO -- In a country where a single conservative party has dominated 38 years of smoke-filled rooms, suddenly the tobacco breath of every politician pleads for "kaikaku" -- reform -- with the eagerness of a suitor saying, "I love you."But like the object of a suitor's attentions, Japan is having its doubts whether this is true love or just another guy on the make.Even Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa -- who scoffed at do-gooders for three decades and only 17 months ago wrested the top job from reformer Toshiki Kaifu with the slogan "time to bring back the big boys" -- now never misses a chance to demand kaikaku in public.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | February 5, 1992
Bill Dorman, third-generation owner, Peoples Electrical Supply Co. Inc., Gay Street.The storefront sign says: "Vacations: the week of July 4th, Christmas week." Otherwise, Mr. Dorman, 47, is here 5:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon, and "whatever time it takes left over to do the books." His 20-year-old daughter works here, too."It's a family business -- if you don't do it, it doesn't get done," he said. "I could leave right now [for the day] and have no problems but I'm taught the old-fashioned way -- you just work."
NEWS
February 4, 1992
Japanese Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa said yesterday Americans are losing "a work ethic" and no longer have a drive to "live by the sweat of their brow." Two weeks ago, another Japanese politician said U.S. workers are lazy.The Evening Sun would like to know what you think. Have Americans lost their work ethic? Have standards "loosened" too much in recent years? Will this controversy make you more or less likely to think about "Buying American?"To register your opinion, call SUNDIAL at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County)
NEWS
By Newsday | January 5, 1992
SINGAPORE -- President Bush, his Pacific Rim tour approaching a politically charged climax in Japan this week, traveled to South Korea today for talks on trade problems plaguing U.S. relations with Seoul.South Korean President Roh Tae Woo is expected to try to guide discussions away from his country's $720 million trade imbalance with the United States. Mr. Roh would much prefer to emphasize shared concerns over North Korea's nuclear bomb-building potential.North and South Korea signed a non-aggression agreement Dec. 13 and Tuesday initialed a draft declaration banning nuclear weapons from the Korean peninsula.
NEWS
March 10, 2001
NO HELP can be expected from Japan for reversing the U.S. economic slowdown. The once-feared Japan has been economically down for a decade and seems to be sinking back into recession. That means the economies of Indonesia and other Southeast Asian tiger cubs, struggling to recover from their meltdown of three years ago, can hardly expect soon the level of Japanese investment to which they were previously accustomed. It was Japan's finance minister, Kiichi Miyazawa, who created a sense of panic last Thursday by saying the nation's finances were "very near collapsing."
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 22, 1993
TOKYO -- Signs that the Liberal Democratic Party might be losing its political dominance for the first time in four decades roiled Japanese financial markets yesterday.Japanese stocks plunged 3 percent and the dollar jumped against the yen after Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa dissolved the lower house of Parliament, throwing the country's leadership into a crisis that could reshape postwar Japanese politics.The political crisis started Friday night when the lower house of Parliament passed a no-confidence vote against Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, forcing him to dissolve the chamber and call a snap election for July 18. About 50 members of Miyazawa's Liberal Democratic Party defected, raising the possibility that the LDP's four decades of political dominance was over.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | April 29, 1993
TOKYO -- In a country where a single conservative party has dominated 38 years of smoke-filled rooms, suddenly the tobacco breath of every politician pleads for "kaikaku" -- reform -- with the eagerness of a suitor saying, "I love you."But like the object of a suitor's attentions, Japan is having its doubts whether this is true love or just another guy on the make.Even Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa -- who scoffed at do-gooders for three decades and only 17 months ago wrested the top job from reformer Toshiki Kaifu with the slogan "time to bring back the big boys" -- now never misses a chance to demand kaikaku in public.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | February 5, 1992
Bill Dorman, third-generation owner, Peoples Electrical Supply Co. Inc., Gay Street.The storefront sign says: "Vacations: the week of July 4th, Christmas week." Otherwise, Mr. Dorman, 47, is here 5:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays, Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon, and "whatever time it takes left over to do the books." His 20-year-old daughter works here, too."It's a family business -- if you don't do it, it doesn't get done," he said. "I could leave right now [for the day] and have no problems but I'm taught the old-fashioned way -- you just work."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 9, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration has expressed concern to the Japanese government over a $360 million loan to help Iran build an electric-generating plant, according to administration officials.The resumption of Japanese aid to Iran comes as the United States is increasing pressure on its allies to isolate Iran because of its funding and arming of terrorists and efforts to develop nuclear weapons.Japanese officials have told the administration that the Japanese government views the financial assistance as a means of moderating the behavior of the Iranians.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | October 28, 1992
TOKYO -- For one afternoon and evening, political scandals and global recession scarcely got mentioned. Japan's TV newscasters had a bigger story: the country's two most sensational teen idols are going to break millions of hearts by marrying.The bride-to-be: Rie Miyazawa, 19, petite idol of the bubble-gum set since her first movie at age 15 and of the skin-book set since last year, when she successfully defied Japan's ban on pubic hair pictures in a million-selling volume called "Santa Fe," after the U.S. city where it was photographed.
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