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By Los Angeles Times | June 20, 1994
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Heavy fighting erupted again yesterday in TC the Rwandan capital of Kigali as rebel guerrillas tried for a decisive victory before the possible intervention of foreign troops.A U.N. spokesman said by phone that the dug-in government troops and the advancing Rwandan Patriotic Front rebels, who already control more than half the country, exchanged mortar, artillery and small-arms fire throughout much of the day. The continuing battles have turned Kigali into a virtual ghost town.
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 27, 1998
Guns don't kill; people do. Television violence doesn't murder; children do.One person's depraved Monster of the Oval Office is another's world-inspiring Conscience of Kigali.The more hotels to be built in the Inner Harbor, the quicker Charles Center will dematerialize.See "Titanic" before it goes down under the weight of all that statuary.Pub Date: 3/27/98
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NEWS
By Dan Berger | March 27, 1998
Guns don't kill; people do. Television violence doesn't murder; children do.One person's depraved Monster of the Oval Office is another's world-inspiring Conscience of Kigali.The more hotels to be built in the Inner Harbor, the quicker Charles Center will dematerialize.See "Titanic" before it goes down under the weight of all that statuary.Pub Date: 3/27/98
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 1998
KIGALI, Rwanda -- President Clinton came to Kigali yesterday to talk to scarred and mutilated survivors of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and to acknowledge that the world could have protected them, though it did not."We in the United States and the world community did not do as much as we could have and should have done to try to limit what occurred in Rwanda in 1994," the president told a half-dozen people in Kigali who lost parents, siblings and children during three months of ethnic mass killing that claimed hundreds of thousands of lives.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 23, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- When the Hutu militias began killing Tutsis in April, Ladislas Benimana, a Hutu, harbored Tutsis in his house, his wife and neighbors recalled.After several weeks, when the militia started raping women, his wife, Catherine Mujawamariya, a secondary school teacher, fled Kigali with their own daughters and several Tutsi women and children they were protecting.Mr. Benimana remained until Kigali fell to the Tutsi rebel army of the Rwandan Patriotic Front in early July, when he fled to the French-protected zone in the southwest, along with thousands of other Hutus uncertain about their fate under the new Tutsi-led government.
NEWS
May 19, 1994
The best chance to end the annihilation of the Tutsi people and general slaughter in Rwanda would be speedy victory by the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF). This force of mostly Tutsi minority men, many raised in exile and only recently returned, is relatively more disciplined than those of what passes for government. Fewer atrocities are attributed to it. Where combat has occurred, it has defeated government troops. It is closing inexorably in on Kigali, the capital.The government of Hutu extremist politicians and soldiers has fled Kigali for the provincial town of Gitarama, 20 miles to the southwest.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Writer | April 15, 1994
During the past week of bloodshed and chaos in her native Rwanda, Nathalie Piraino, 37, has sat in her Carney home, garnering scraps of horrifying news.Breaking through on jammed telephone lines a handful of times, she has been told that one of her sisters has already been slaughtered along with her 10 children. She reached another sister, hiding in the capital, Kigali, terrified that the same fate awaited her."Every minute, she told me, they expect to be killed," Mrs. Piraino said last night, her words punctuated by sobs.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 9, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- To visit the new prime minister of Rwanda, you go to the Meridian Hotel, make your way past the bullet-scarred windows, between the walls of sandbags, walk up five flights of stairs and head for Room 519.Somewhere along the line, an official of the new government will appear and you can negotiate an appointment, all the while trying to ignore the stench in the air, an inevitable smell that comes when a hotel has been full but the plumbing...
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 1996
KIGALI, Rwanda -- His memory is a swirl of radio broadcasts, beer breaks and hillside mobs. Even the details that should be indelible are blurred, such as those connected with the morning two years ago when he killed his neighbor's two young children with a wooden club spiked with nails."
NEWS
By Association Press | October 15, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- Is a new round of massacres taking place in Rwanda, this time directed against the country's Hutu majority?The almost 5,000 United Nations troops spread out on the ground throughout Rwanda, conducting daily patrols, concluded this week that they cannot document a single instance of a recent massacre that would support the claims.Rwanda's new Tutsi-led government strenuously denies any campaign of reprisal killings. It has opened its territory for U.N. inspection and has blasted the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees and other agencies as "irresponsible" for falling for charges from Hutus in neighboring countries.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 30, 1996
KIGALI, Rwanda -- His memory is a swirl of radio broadcasts, beer breaks and hillside mobs. Even the details that should be indelible are blurred, such as those connected with the morning two years ago when he killed his neighbor's two young children with a wooden club spiked with nails."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 23, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- When the Hutu militias began killing Tutsis in April, Ladislas Benimana, a Hutu, harbored Tutsis in his house, his wife and neighbors recalled.After several weeks, when the militia started raping women, his wife, Catherine Mujawamariya, a secondary school teacher, fled Kigali with their own daughters and several Tutsi women and children they were protecting.Mr. Benimana remained until Kigali fell to the Tutsi rebel army of the Rwandan Patriotic Front in early July, when he fled to the French-protected zone in the southwest, along with thousands of other Hutus uncertain about their fate under the new Tutsi-led government.
NEWS
By Association Press | October 15, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- Is a new round of massacres taking place in Rwanda, this time directed against the country's Hutu majority?The almost 5,000 United Nations troops spread out on the ground throughout Rwanda, conducting daily patrols, concluded this week that they cannot document a single instance of a recent massacre that would support the claims.Rwanda's new Tutsi-led government strenuously denies any campaign of reprisal killings. It has opened its territory for U.N. inspection and has blasted the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees and other agencies as "irresponsible" for falling for charges from Hutus in neighboring countries.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Special to The Sun | September 18, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- Bread loaves, foam mattresses and plastic water jugs are stuffed in the aisle and under the seats. Dance music squeals from a single speaker as the bus rumbles through Uganda toward the border.Many of the 56 passengers have been waiting three decades to return to Rwanda.In the early 1960s, tens of thousands of Tutsis fled north into Uganda to escape Hutu killers. Since last month, hundreds a day have been going back. Many were born in Uganda and only know Rwanda from their parents' romantic tales.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 11, 1994
NYAMATA, Rwanda -- No one knows how many dead lie beneath the two long scars of red earth just behind the Roman Catholic church in this rural town.The smallest number you hear is 600. A priest who came after the April killings to run an orphanage says he understands it is more than 1,000. In the town, some talk of 6,000 dead, though they seem to mean in the entire area.Obed Mbarushimana's mother died. He is not sure where or how. He knows how his father died. He was walking with him when the killers caught up to them.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 9, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- To visit the new prime minister of Rwanda, you go to the Meridian Hotel, make your way past the bullet-scarred windows, between the walls of sandbags, walk up five flights of stairs and head for Room 519.Somewhere along the line, an official of the new government will appear and you can negotiate an appointment, all the while trying to ignore the stench in the air, an inevitable smell that comes when a hotel has been full but the plumbing...
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 26, 1998
KIGALI, Rwanda -- President Clinton came to Kigali yesterday to talk to scarred and mutilated survivors of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda and to acknowledge that the world could have protected them, though it did not."We in the United States and the world community did not do as much as we could have and should have done to try to limit what occurred in Rwanda in 1994," the president told a half-dozen people in Kigali who lost parents, siblings and children during three months of ethnic mass killing that claimed hundreds of thousands of lives.
NEWS
By Alan Zarembo and Alan Zarembo,Special to The Sun | September 18, 1994
KIGALI, Rwanda -- Bread loaves, foam mattresses and plastic water jugs are stuffed in the aisle and under the seats. Dance music squeals from a single speaker as the bus rumbles through Uganda toward the border.Many of the 56 passengers have been waiting three decades to return to Rwanda.In the early 1960s, tens of thousands of Tutsis fled north into Uganda to escape Hutu killers. Since last month, hundreds a day have been going back. Many were born in Uganda and only know Rwanda from their parents' romantic tales.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | June 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The only American to stay in Rwanda's capital throughout its civil war draws comfort from glimpses of human decency amid the "utter hatred" around him."Through it all, God has called us . . . to look for some of the good in all the ugly stuff," says Carl Wilkens, 36.By day, Mr. Wilkens runs what remains of the Adventist Development and Relief Agency's Kigali operation -- its offices and warehouse have been burned and looted, and some of its employees have been killed in the genocide that has claimed hundreds of thousands of lives.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | June 20, 1994
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Heavy fighting erupted again yesterday in TC the Rwandan capital of Kigali as rebel guerrillas tried for a decisive victory before the possible intervention of foreign troops.A U.N. spokesman said by phone that the dug-in government troops and the advancing Rwandan Patriotic Front rebels, who already control more than half the country, exchanged mortar, artillery and small-arms fire throughout much of the day. The continuing battles have turned Kigali into a virtual ghost town.
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