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By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2005
As soon as you step through the front door of 524 S. Washington St., it hits you: the spicy, smoky, garlicky and altogether unmistakable smell of tradition. For 86 years at this tan rowhouse on a residential Fells Point street, a family named Ostrowksi has practiced carnivorous magic, making homemade sausages that people return for again and again. For 86 years, it's been one Ostrowski or another grinding, seasoning and hand-shaping that meat, working to the dictates of time-tested recipes.
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FEATURES
Susan Reimer | November 23, 2010
As I write this, Thanksgiving is only hours away, and I still have no idea what I am serving. There will be a turkey, of course. And potatoes and vegetables and stuffing and gravy. But exactly what form these basic elements will take is still under discussion with my daughter, who believes she was cruelly separated at birth from Ina Garten. I call it "Thanksgiving in the time of the Food Network: All bets are off. " These cooking shows — which are to college students what soap operas were to us when we were in school — have produced a generation of confident young cooks who don't think you have to have years of practice under your belt before you prepare your first truffle.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 28, 2003
Throughout our country, autumn signals not only a change in weather but also the arrival of the football season, with its attendant social activities. Fall football fervor is a familiar phenomenon for me. I grew up in Memphis, Tenn., and remember rooting for Ole Miss, my parents' favorite team. My mother and dad used to pack the car with blankets and food baskets on Saturday mornings, then rush across the state line to Oxford to attend the University of Mississippi games. For more than a decade, my husband, son and I lived in Columbus, Ohio, where we cheered the Ohio State Buckeyes (who, by the way, are the national champions)
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 15, 2006
Cabbage and potatoes seem natural to give a nod to St. Patrick. Here's a vegetable-packed soup that is hearty enough to hold you over, yet fast enough to fend off pre-dinner yowling. Its secret: Dicing the ingredients makes them cook faster. You probably have most of this stuff on hand. It needs nothing but lightly buttered bread, preferably pumpernickel, to accompany it. Pick up dessert on the way home if your crowd wants a sweet. And cleanup is simple, too, because you'll have only one pot to wash.
NEWS
By ROBIN MATHER JENKINS and ROBIN MATHER JENKINS,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 15, 2006
Cabbage and potatoes seem natural to give a nod to St. Patrick. Here's a vegetable-packed soup that is hearty enough to hold you over, yet fast enough to fend off pre-dinner yowling. Its secret: Dicing the ingredients makes them cook faster. You probably have most of this stuff on hand. It needs nothing but lightly buttered bread, preferably pumpernickel, to accompany it. Pick up dessert on the way home if your crowd wants a sweet. And cleanup is simple, too, because you'll have only one pot to wash.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 14, 1999
Last month, my family had a delicious meal in a small Boston restaurant called the Franklin Cafe. My son and his girlfriend both love this dining spot and recommended it.Every dish we ordered, including spicy pork tenderloins served with mashed potatoes, trout fillets with bread-and-roasted-tomato stuffing, and racks of veal with caramelized country cabbage, was robust and bursting with flavor.Of all the food we sampled that night, however, the cabbage was my favorite.When I asked chefs David Dubois and Dan Ryan how the vegetable was prepared, I was amazed to discover that the recipe has only two main ingredients -- cabbage and butter.
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Special to The Sun | February 1, 1994
This long run of wintry weather demands drastic action. So I warm up the kitchen by cooking something real. I want a big pot full of hearty food I can eat, guilt-free. I want some nutrition in there, and I want comfort.I want to do enough work to feel like I've made something from scratch, but I don't want it to take forever.My peasant roots call me back to the basics . . . potatoes, cabbage, sausage, apples and onions. These are things I often have in my fridge in winter.In fact, the first time I made this, I was just rooting around to see what was in there.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | November 17, 1999
* Item: Smithfield Smoked Ham Sausage* What you get: 8 (2 ounce) servings* Cost: About $2* Preparation time: Just heat and serve* Review: If you like Smithfield's famous cured hams and other smoked meats, you'll love this new blend of chopped fresh ham and country-cured ham in a sausage casing. It's a nice change of pace on the grill or warmed in the microwave. Cut it in chunks and add to scalloped potatoes, macaroni and cheese, or even baked beans. Use it on an updated sausage sandwich. My only quibble is the portion size.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 16, 2005
Baby, it's cold outside, very cold. And when you come inside, you want something warming, and you want it right away. This dish almost could be called "snow-shovel soup" in honor of its warming properties after that hated winter task, but it's not quite a soup, nor quite a pasta dish. The broth gets added near the end, and it's just enough to float the stars of the dish: the sausage, greens and other vegetables. All you need add is a good crusty bread. For dessert, a bit of a downscale guilty pleasure after the healthful- ness of the main dish: canned cling peaches in heavy syrup (light syrup only saves you about 20 calories, so who are we kidding?
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | November 23, 2010
As I write this, Thanksgiving is only hours away, and I still have no idea what I am serving. There will be a turkey, of course. And potatoes and vegetables and stuffing and gravy. But exactly what form these basic elements will take is still under discussion with my daughter, who believes she was cruelly separated at birth from Ina Garten. I call it "Thanksgiving in the time of the Food Network: All bets are off. " These cooking shows — which are to college students what soap operas were to us when we were in school — have produced a generation of confident young cooks who don't think you have to have years of practice under your belt before you prepare your first truffle.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 17, 2005
Whether you're serving a glistening, glazed ham, stately standing prime rib of beef, a sleek leg of lamb, golden roasted turkey or another equally tantalizing Christmas main course, if you're like me you may remain undecided on the side dishes until the last minute. I'm opting for a beef tenderloin as the star attraction this year, and I've picked a dessert (chocolate chestnut cheesecake) and an appetizer (Stilton surrounded with dried fruit and crisp crackers). But the accompaniments were still up in the air until a few days ago. During a recent cooking class where I prepared wild rice with apples, cranberries and sausage as part of the menu, I had a eureka moment, suddenly realizing that this side dish was so versatile it could accompany any number of holiday entrees.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2005
As soon as you step through the front door of 524 S. Washington St., it hits you: the spicy, smoky, garlicky and altogether unmistakable smell of tradition. For 86 years at this tan rowhouse on a residential Fells Point street, a family named Ostrowksi has practiced carnivorous magic, making homemade sausages that people return for again and again. For 86 years, it's been one Ostrowski or another grinding, seasoning and hand-shaping that meat, working to the dictates of time-tested recipes.
NEWS
By Joe Gray and Joe Gray,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 16, 2005
Baby, it's cold outside, very cold. And when you come inside, you want something warming, and you want it right away. This dish almost could be called "snow-shovel soup" in honor of its warming properties after that hated winter task, but it's not quite a soup, nor quite a pasta dish. The broth gets added near the end, and it's just enough to float the stars of the dish: the sausage, greens and other vegetables. All you need add is a good crusty bread. For dessert, a bit of a downscale guilty pleasure after the healthful- ness of the main dish: canned cling peaches in heavy syrup (light syrup only saves you about 20 calories, so who are we kidding?
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | September 28, 2003
Throughout our country, autumn signals not only a change in weather but also the arrival of the football season, with its attendant social activities. Fall football fervor is a familiar phenomenon for me. I grew up in Memphis, Tenn., and remember rooting for Ole Miss, my parents' favorite team. My mother and dad used to pack the car with blankets and food baskets on Saturday mornings, then rush across the state line to Oxford to attend the University of Mississippi games. For more than a decade, my husband, son and I lived in Columbus, Ohio, where we cheered the Ohio State Buckeyes (who, by the way, are the national champions)
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | June 4, 2000
What do you get when you put together a 20-foot ramp, 150 gallons of house paint, two leaf blowers, one chain saw -- and August Bellanca riding a BMX stunt bike with spiked tires through sloshing pools of pigment? You get "The Fluidity of Crashing Paint," Bellanca's work of performance art, a half-hour frenzy yesterday in the middle of a bike festival in Patterson Park in East Baltimore. You get a couple hundred diverse spectators: kids wowed by Bellanca's wheelsmanship; grown-ups intellectualizing about the nature of art; other grown-ups tut-tutting about the wanton spillage of all that perfectly good paint.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay | November 17, 1999
* Item: Smithfield Smoked Ham Sausage* What you get: 8 (2 ounce) servings* Cost: About $2* Preparation time: Just heat and serve* Review: If you like Smithfield's famous cured hams and other smoked meats, you'll love this new blend of chopped fresh ham and country-cured ham in a sausage casing. It's a nice change of pace on the grill or warmed in the microwave. Cut it in chunks and add to scalloped potatoes, macaroni and cheese, or even baked beans. Use it on an updated sausage sandwich. My only quibble is the portion size.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | December 17, 2005
Whether you're serving a glistening, glazed ham, stately standing prime rib of beef, a sleek leg of lamb, golden roasted turkey or another equally tantalizing Christmas main course, if you're like me you may remain undecided on the side dishes until the last minute. I'm opting for a beef tenderloin as the star attraction this year, and I've picked a dessert (chocolate chestnut cheesecake) and an appetizer (Stilton surrounded with dried fruit and crisp crackers). But the accompaniments were still up in the air until a few days ago. During a recent cooking class where I prepared wild rice with apples, cranberries and sausage as part of the menu, I had a eureka moment, suddenly realizing that this side dish was so versatile it could accompany any number of holiday entrees.
FEATURES
By CATHY THOMAS | December 25, 1994
Enjoy the warmth you're feeling today -- that Christmas glow won't last. The holiday spirit will fade in a couple of days and then it will hit -- it's winter! Time for scarves, gloves, long johns, boots and bean soup. Growing up, my brothers and I relished bean-soup night -- a frequent cold-weather event when Dad took over the stove and rustled up a large pot brimming with white beans, chunks of vegetables and a meaty hambone.We swilled down this hearty concoction with delight while Dad pontificated about the virtues of the noble dried bean.
NEWS
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | February 14, 1999
Last month, my family had a delicious meal in a small Boston restaurant called the Franklin Cafe. My son and his girlfriend both love this dining spot and recommended it.Every dish we ordered, including spicy pork tenderloins served with mashed potatoes, trout fillets with bread-and-roasted-tomato stuffing, and racks of veal with caramelized country cabbage, was robust and bursting with flavor.Of all the food we sampled that night, however, the cabbage was my favorite.When I asked chefs David Dubois and Dan Ryan how the vegetable was prepared, I was amazed to discover that the recipe has only two main ingredients -- cabbage and butter.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1996
John F. Griber, whose landmark Curtis Bay corner grocery store kept neighborhood tables and pantries supplied with fresh meats and vegetables, died Thursday of stroke complications at Meridian Nursing Center-Hammonds Lane. He was 84.For more than 60 years, "Mr. John" -- as he was called -- operated Griber's Grocery at Pennington Avenue and Church Street. In 1990, he retired and closed the business.Mr. Griber, who was born on Church Street and lived his entire life there, was the son of Lithuanian parents, who immigrated to Baltimore from Vilna at the turn of the century.
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