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HEALTH
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
Eagerness to spread the word about kidney disease is enough to drive local residents up a wall — or down a tower. On June 19, some will take to the side of the 24-story Legg Mason Tower in Harbor East, then rappel down one of Baltimore's most prominent skyscrapers as part of a fundraising approach by the National Kidney Foundation of Maryland. Rappel for Kidney Health is designed to raise awareness about a disease that affects one in nine Marylanders. Each participant must raise at least $1,000 in advance.
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HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | May 22, 2010
The opera singer who eventually became Dr. Robert A. Montgomery's wife would never have taken him for a kidney transplant surgeon the first time she saw him, not with the long hair and that outrageous mustache. Maybe a biker, she figured, and maybe she was onto something there. When he heads for work at Johns Hopkins Hospital from his loft in Fells Point or the manse he shares in Bethesda with Denyce Graves, the internationally known mezzo soprano, Montgomery roars off in his 500-horsepower Shelby Cobra, painted white with a blue stripe down the center.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 30, 2010
At 71, with more than two years of a punishing schedule of dialysis under his belt, William Kavadias thought a new kidney would never come. Transplants, he assumed, were for the young. But last year, Kavadias' life-saving chance came in an unlikely package - a kidney from an older donor became available. The transplant was successful, and today he's feeling great. It's the kind of surgery that many surgeons won't bother to perform. While kidneys from older donors are not suitable for younger patients, they can save seniors' lives, say some transplant surgeons.
NEWS
March 25, 2010
Working poor people struggle to pay rising rent, electirc and other necessary bills. Obamacare is requiring us to buy heath insurance or face a fine. It is telling working families how to budget and spend their money. I am not against sick people obtaining coverage. I have a daughter with kidney disease and another daughter with hydrocephalus (water on the brain). I've paid COBRA rates. I am not against reducing those rates. I am not against anyone receiving the care they need, but there needs to be a better way to reform!
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | January 31, 2010
Maryland GreenHawks coach Otis Hailey died from kidney failure Saturday morning, the Premier Basketball League announced. "On behalf of the Premier Basketball League, its players and staff, we send our condolences to Otis Hailey's family," PBL chairman Severko Hrywnak said in statement. Hailey had been named GreenHawks coach Jan. 19, replacing Rob Spon . Hailey coached two games for the GreenHawks, winning against the Quebec Kebs and losing to the Rochester RazorSharks.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | November 11, 2009
When 10-year-old Sean Menard's battle with kidney disease took a turn for the worse, his former kindergarten teacher's aide offered him one of her kidneys. When it turned out she was not a good match, her husband volunteered. His act of kindness not only enabled Sean to get the kidney he desperately needed, but it became a vital link in a chain of four donors who would give their healthy kidneys to four people in need of new organs. The University of Maryland Medical Center announced the series of donations Tuesday, which marked its first kidney exchange.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | July 8, 2009
It all started when a Virginia man read his church bulletin one Sunday. A woman from his parish, someone he had never met, needed a kidney. Thomas F. Koontz, grateful that God had recently saved his teenage daughter from brain cancer, offered her one of his. When the woman found a more suitable donor, the 54-year-old retired Marine called Johns Hopkins Hospital. Was there someone else, he wondered, who might need his kidney? Koontz's selfless act started a chain of events that would allow not just one person to get a desperately needed kidney but eight people to get new organs to keep them alive and thriving.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | July 3, 2009
Robert Imes, a painter and mechanic at Johns Hopkins Hospital, had been too sick to work for nearly a year. When he came back, he ran into Pamela Paulk, the hospital's vice president for human resources, outside her office. "I said, 'Robert, I really missed you. Is there anything I can do for you?' " she recalls. "He said, 'I need a kidney.' And I said, 'You can have mine.' " Turns out, she meant it - and she has been sharing the entire experience, blogging about the days leading up to the June 22 surgery and the days since (www.
NEWS
February 18, 2009
Man fatally shot trying to disarm a police officer 3 A man was fatally shot last night while attempting to disarm a Southeastern District police officer who was investigating a report of a domestic situation, police said. The officer's name and that of the man were not released. Shortly before 9:15 p.m., the officer was talking to the man in the 2700 block of Orleans St. near Lakewood Avenue when he attacked the officer. Police said at least one area resident called police, telling them that the man had the officer on the ground and was holding her in a head-lock while trying to take her gun. Within minutes, several other officers responded.
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