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By a Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1994
The talk among shareholders before Mercantile Bankshares Corp.'s annual meeting yesterday centered on ultrasound lithotripters, not earnings or stock prices. That's because the company's chairman and chief executive officer, H. Furlong Baldwin, was forced to miss the meeting because of an attack of kidney stones yesterday morning.Mr. Baldwin, 62, had to skip what has been an occasionally provocative speech he's made to shareholders annually since 1976, when he became chairman of Mercantile.
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SPORTS
By Dan Connolly | April 21, 2012
Left fielder Nolan Reimold was out of the lineup Saturday due to reoccurring neck spasms, which cost him a game Thursday as well. Reimold had three hits Friday against the Angels, including a two-run homer, but said he started feeling the spasms return as the game progressed. “It got steadily worse throughout the game and just flared up after the game pretty bad once I started cooling down,” said Reimold, who has five homers and nine RBIs on the road trip. “When I woke up (Saturday)
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FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 1997
I have just begun to have menopausal symptoms and don't know what to do about calcium. Two years ago I passed a kidney stone, which my doctor told me contained calcium oxalate, and it seems logical to me to lower my use of calcium. On the other hand, calcium supplements are recommended to prevent osteoporosis after menopause.What do you recommend?Calcium oxalate stones are the most common type of kidney stones. Because calcium oxalate is not very soluble, formation of these stones is promoted by high concentrations of calcium and/or oxalate in the urine.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
Maryland coach Mark Turgeon spoke to his team for a long time in the locker room after Maryland's 89-63 loss to Iona -- a game in which the Terps had 26 turnovers. But when the coach emerged, he was no less frustrated. Turgeon, who has had to endure kidney stones this weekend, can be very candid. He tends to speak his mind. Here is some of what he said at his post-game briefing. He was a portrait of frustration. At times, he literally lowered his head and stared at the floor.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | December 29, 2006
Doctors at Johns Hopkins and other medical institutions are beginning to report a curious increase in children with kidney stones - another possible consequence of America's dependence on processed foods. Bad eating habits have already fueled twin epidemics of childhood obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Although doctors have blamed fats and sugar for those ills, they say the culprit in this case may be two other features of the fast-food culture: too much salt and not enough water. Though kidney stones remain uncommon among children, specialists who once treated only a few cases a year are trying to figure out why they are now seeing many times that number.
NEWS
By Nancy Menefee Jackson and Nancy Menefee Jackson,Special to the Sun | December 26, 1999
Cal Ripken has played in pain. Keeping a streak alive, despite the pain, is something Jane Good of Annapolis knows all too well.Good, 51, and a professor of history at the Naval Academy, has run at least a mile every single day since August 1985."
NEWS
August 11, 2006
Did you know?--Kidney stones are more prevalent in summer because many people don't drink enough water in hotter temperatures. Baylor Medical Center
NEWS
By Gailor Large and Gailor Large,Special to the Sun | October 12, 2003
Are high doses of vitamin C dangerous? I've heard that water-soluble vitamins are harmless, but I recently read that too much "C" can cause kidney stones. Is this true? According to Dr. Thomas Erlinger, of Johns Hopkins, "There have been reports of kidney damage with high doses of vitamin C, including kidney stones." But before you go on a citrus-free diet, take heart. Erlinger says these problems are most common in patients with underlying kidney disease and in those receiving vitamin C intravenously.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler | December 3, 1997
BSO music director David Zinman, whose tour of Japan with the symphony was cut short last week because of an attack of kidney stones, left for Switzerland yesterday."
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre and Colleen Pierre,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 27, 1997
"Common sense" is not always your best guide to sound nutrition. Often good research is the only way to get to the truth. The news about calcium and kidney stones is a case in point.Harvard researchers tracked almost 92,000 nurses for 12 years to see if there was a relationship between calcium intake and kidney stones. The results were similar to what they learned about men in 1993. Those who got the most calcium from their diets were at lower risk for kidney stones. This is exactly the opposite of common sense practiced through the ages.
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,Los Angeles Times | January 3, 2009
BEIJING - Chinese police have detained at least five parents who were trying to hold a news conference to publicize the plight of their children, who are suffering from kidney stones as a result of drinking tainted baby formula. The parents were taken late Thursday to a hotel often used by police as a temporary detention center on the outskirts of Beijing. They had scheduled a news conference in the capital for yesterday afternoon, according to lawyers. "It is sorrowful for our nation.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2008
About 10 percent of Americans may at some point develop kidney stones, says Brian R. Matlaga, director of stone disease at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. Kidney stones, which are hard masses of crystals that form within the urinary tract, can cause extreme pain as they pass out of the body, infection and, in some cases, can block the ureter. What are kidney stones? Everyone's urine contains some crystals, but a stone occurs when these crystals bind together and aggregate until they achieve a size at which [the mass formed]
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 19, 2008
BEIJING - The mayor of a city whose officials have been accused of failing to deal with reports of tainted baby milk was dismissed yesterday as the government announced that a fourth infant had died and that the police had arrested a dozen more people in a widening investigation. The mayor of Shijiazhuang, Ji Chuntang, was the most senior official to be fired so far in the growing milk scandal. Ji had been removed Wednesday from his post as deputy secretary of the Shijiazhuang Municipal Committee of the Communist Party, according to Xinhua, the state news agency.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | January 19, 2007
I saw part of a news story on TV that said people who take Nexium (and similar drugs) for a year or more are at greater risk of bone-density loss and have more bone fractures. I have been taking Nexium for heartburn for almost a year and a half. I have had a knee replacement and a total hip replacement. I did not get the details of who did the study and how. I want to ask my gastroenterologist if I can stop taking Nexium, but I would like to be able to give him some details. Can you supply them?
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Sun reporter | December 29, 2006
Doctors at Johns Hopkins and other medical institutions are beginning to report a curious increase in children with kidney stones - another possible consequence of America's dependence on processed foods. Bad eating habits have already fueled twin epidemics of childhood obesity and Type 2 diabetes. Although doctors have blamed fats and sugar for those ills, they say the culprit in this case may be two other features of the fast-food culture: too much salt and not enough water. Though kidney stones remain uncommon among children, specialists who once treated only a few cases a year are trying to figure out why they are now seeing many times that number.
NEWS
August 11, 2006
Did you know?--Kidney stones are more prevalent in summer because many people don't drink enough water in hotter temperatures. Baylor Medical Center
NEWS
By Barbara Demick and Barbara Demick,Los Angeles Times | January 3, 2009
BEIJING - Chinese police have detained at least five parents who were trying to hold a news conference to publicize the plight of their children, who are suffering from kidney stones as a result of drinking tainted baby formula. The parents were taken late Thursday to a hotel often used by police as a temporary detention center on the outskirts of Beijing. They had scheduled a news conference in the capital for yesterday afternoon, according to lawyers. "It is sorrowful for our nation.
NEWS
March 10, 1991
More patients and a change in the license to accommodate them have Carroll County General Hospital bustling with activity, administratorssaid at the board's quarterly meeting last week.The state just increased the hospital's number of licensed beds by 10, making it a 128-bed hospital. State regulations allow an increase of up to 10 everytwo years.But the patient census has run as high as 135 some days, including outpatients, meaning some beds got used twice in one day, said Deanna Dell, vice president for nursing.
NEWS
By JUDY FOREMAN | August 4, 2006
Do nasal steroids taken for allergies cause eye problems? Steroids, especially those inhaled through the mouth to control asthma and those taken orally or intravenously for conditions such as arthritis and emphysema, can cause side effects in the eye, including cataracts and glaucoma. But steroids such as Flonase, which are sniffed just through the nose, appear to be fairly safe for the eye. In fact, the most common side effects of nasal steroids are a burning sensation in the nose or bleeding, especially if steroids are sprayed directly on the septum, the cartilage-based tissue that divides the two nostrils, said Dr. Ralph Metson, a sinus surgeon at the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | February 20, 2005
I took Vioxx for three years to ease arthritis pain. When it was taken off the market, my doctor switched me over to Bextra. Two months later, I had a stroke. My doctor says I should no longer take Bextra, Celebrex or any other drug like that. What can I do for my stiff, painful joints? We are so sorry to hear that you had a stroke while taking Bextra. Vioxx was taken off the market because it raised the risk of heart attacks and strokes. Dr. David Graham, safety reviewer for the Food and Drug Administration, estimates that as many as 140,000 people might have suffered heart attacks while on Vioxx.
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