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Kidney Failure

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SPORTS
By Sports Digest | January 31, 2010
Maryland GreenHawks coach Otis Hailey died from kidney failure Saturday morning, the Premier Basketball League announced. "On behalf of the Premier Basketball League, its players and staff, we send our condolences to Otis Hailey's family," PBL chairman Severko Hrywnak said in statement. Hailey had been named GreenHawks coach Jan. 19, replacing Rob Spon . Hailey coached two games for the GreenHawks, winning against the Quebec Kebs and losing to the Rochester RazorSharks.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2013
Louis F. Markel, who owned and operated a North Point Creek boatyard, died Saturday of kidney failure at his Edgemere home. He was 72. Louis Frederick Markel was born and raised at the boatyard on North Point Creek. His father, Louis F. Markel, a licensed charter boat captain and boat builder, established Markel's Boat Yard in 1941. After his father's death in 1950, his mother, Dorothy Markel, took over operation of the yard; she retired in 1976. Mr. Markel was a graduate of Sparrows Point High School and worked for the U.S. Defense Department's Investigative Services until retiring in 1982, when he took over the boatyard's operations.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | December 2, 1992
An article in yesterday's Sun should have said that scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine Hospital expected to find in a study performed there that poverty and other social factors were to blame for the higher incidence of kidney failure among blacks with diabetes. In their study, they were surprised to find, however, that an inherited predisposition is probably responsible for the higher rates.The Sun regrets the error.Scientists searching for clues to why diabetic blacks suffer disproportionately from potentially fatal kidney failure have suggested that a genetic factor rather than poverty or poor health care is chiefly to blame.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | September 29, 2013
Gene "Cousin Luke" Petit passed away Sunday morning, according to a report from Mike Johnson of PWInsider . The cause of death is currently unknown. Petit had been suffering from multiple sclerosis in recent years, which caused him to lose a considerable amount of weight. Petit is best known as portraying "Cousin Luke" in WWE in 1985 and 1986 as part of Hillbilly Jim's family. Hillbilly Jim is now the only member still alive -- Uncle Elmer (Stan Frazier) died in 1992 from kidney failure and Cousin Junior (Larry Kean)
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | October 27, 1994
In the United States, which has the highest death rate from kidney failure in the world, kidney shutdown strikes black Americans at four times the rate of whites.In response to the crisis, the National Institutes of Health announced yesterday in Orlando, Fla., that it was beginning a nationwide study of hypertension and kidney failure in black Americans.While there are myriad reasons why kidneys fail, hypertension is a primary reason why blacks wind up on dialysis and, ultimately, on lists for transplants.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
"Alaska," a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering from kidney failure, zoo officials said. The female bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 4, 2003
DETROIT - Americans who get a second chance at life with an organ transplant often go on to develop kidney failure and sometimes die of it, according to the largest study on the issue. The study, published in today's New England Journal of Medicine, has important implications for the 82,581 Americans waiting for transplants. "The message is there's an increased risk of kidney failure, that people should know about it, and they should be prepared to go through another transplant," said Dr. Akinlolu Ojo, a University of Michigan transplant specialist and senior author of the study.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Alaska, a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering kidney failure, zoo officials said. The bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
NEWS
June 7, 1994
Earle Warren, 79, an alto saxophonist and singer best known for his work with the original Count Basie Orchestra, died of complications of a stroke and kidney failure Saturday in Springfield, Ohio, where he lived.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1997
A flulike illness, transmitted by animal urine and usually regarded as a rural threat, appears to be a common inner-city hazard, according to researchers at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health.Writing in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, the scientists described three severe cases of leptospirosis in Baltimore and found strong evidence that the victims were infected through cuts suffered in rat-infested alleys.A 1992 Baltimore study that revealed that many inner-city residents have developed antibodies from exposure to the bacteria.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Julie Stitt begged her husband for years to let her donate her kidney as he spent nearly a decade in dialysis, through two failed transplants. Last year, he relented. It was a difficult decision. Her husband, Chuck, didn't want her to make the sacrifice. And she knew her father, Richard Kern, would need a transplant eventually as nearly five decades of diabetes wore on his kidneys. That time came about a month after her decision. "It was a hard place," Julie Stitt said. "I wanted to give to my husband, but I knew my father would need one. " She volunteered to donate to a stranger, getting her husband on a donation exchange waiting list.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is proposing a 10 percent cut to the Medicare payment for dialysis - a proposed reduction that is ill-advised, to say the least ("Medicare cuts hit dialysis hard," July 15). Dangerous would be a far better term. Dialysis providers faced with this eventuality will of necessity have to cut back. Each cutback will result in a reduction of quality care. I am living with kidney failure. Dialysis has been my life-saving therapy for more than 13 years.
NEWS
July 15, 2013
On July 1, Medicare proposed a dramatic and disappointing reduction in dialysis payment rates that could jeopardize local dialysis care. As a dialysis professional I am responsible for some of the sickest and most vulnerable patients in Maryland, those with kidney failure who depend on dialysis three times each week to stay alive. Most people on dialysis, regardless of age, have Medicare. The new Medicare cuts worry me. The cost impact could result in reduced dialysis services and clinic closures at a time when kidney disease is rising in our state.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2013
Jesse Tyson Sr., a retired mason who was known for his grilling skills, died April 27 of kidney failure at his Edgemere home. He was 70. The son of a mason and a homemaker, he was born in Clarksville, Va., and was raised in Edgemere. He was a graduate of Baltimore County public schools. Before retiring in 2006, Mr. Tyson worked locally for more than 30 years as a mason, and was "exceptionally proud" of his designs and craftsmanship in building fireplaces, family members said.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
"Alaska," a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering from kidney failure, zoo officials said. The female bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Alaska, a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering kidney failure, zoo officials said. The bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Julie Stitt begged her husband for years to let her donate her kidney as he spent nearly a decade in dialysis, through two failed transplants. Last year, he relented. It was a difficult decision. Her husband, Chuck, didn't want her to make the sacrifice. And she knew her father, Richard Kern, would need a transplant eventually as nearly five decades of diabetes wore on his kidneys. That time came about a month after her decision. "It was a hard place," Julie Stitt said. "I wanted to give to my husband, but I knew my father would need one. " She volunteered to donate to a stranger, getting her husband on a donation exchange waiting list.
NEWS
July 17, 2000
John O. Pastore, 93, a former Rhode Island governor and U.S. senator with a gift for oratory, died Saturday of kidney failure at a nursing home in North Kingstown, R.I., where he was being treated for Parkinson's disease. His political career included four years as the state's governor and 26 years in the Senate.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
Ruth F. Friedman, a homemaker and former Pikesville resident, died Oct. 6 of kidney failure at the Jewish Nursing Home in Harrisburg, Pa. She was 97. The daughter of a businessman and a homemaker, Ruth F. Mazur was born in Burlington, N.C., and later moved to Baltimore, where she graduated from Forest Park High School. Before her 1938 marriage to clothing manufacturer Henry Cohen, Mrs. Friedman worked as a secretary for U.S. Sen. George L. Radcliffe. After her first husband's death in 1966, Mrs. Friedman married Dr. Louis W. Wice, a Baltimore physician, in 1969.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 12, 2011
Wade P. Thomas Jr., a retired Annapolis lawyer who earlier had owned a bakery chain, died July 2 of kidney failure at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The longtime Crofton resident was 83. He was born in Baltimore and raised on Wardman Road in Stoneleigh. He was a 1946 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School and earned a bachelor's degree in 1950 from the University of Virginia. Mr. Thomas was a salesman for National Cash Register Corp. and owned a chain of six Cakery Bakeries, with five stores in Maryland and one in North Carolina.
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