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Kidney Disease

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NEWS
July 23, 2013
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is proposing a 10 percent cut to the Medicare payment for dialysis - a proposed reduction that is ill-advised, to say the least ("Medicare cuts hit dialysis hard," July 15). Dangerous would be a far better term. Dialysis providers faced with this eventuality will of necessity have to cut back. Each cutback will result in a reduction of quality care. I am living with kidney failure. Dialysis has been my life-saving therapy for more than 13 years.
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NEWS
May 7, 2014
My older cat seems more lethargic than usual. What might be causing this? As cats age, many develop associated geriatric disorders, as people do. Often, these age-related issues can creep up so slowly that they go almost unnoticed, or are simply attributed to the inevitable passage of time. And while some geriatric conditions are indeed simply the natural order of things, there are a variety of ailments that can detract from a pet's quality of life but are treatable. That's why we highly recommend exams twice a year and more intensive annual screenings for pets over 7 years old, so we know exactly what's going on with our furry friends.
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NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff Writer | March 31, 1995
After six months of painstaking detective work, Johns Hopkins researchers have decoded the molecules that make up the complex gene that causes polycystic kidney disease, the most common inherited disease in the United States.While European scientists had partially identified the gene last year, the Hopkins team finished that work and created a "blueprint" for understanding the biology and evolution of the gene. That means researchers will now be able to figure out how the gene functions -- and why it mutates.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
To see 2-year-old James Paglio of Fort Meade playing on the floor, his cherry-red cheeks glowing as he tows a toy truck behind a sofa, you'd never know that he suffers from kidney disease so severe he often needs up to 15 medications a day and has been on dialysis since October. His warm, crinkling eyes belie how he once feared strangers - all too many have come to perform painful medical procedures. To see 19-year-old Taylor Chappell of Glen Burnie, you'd never know that doctors have deemed her an ideal donor match for James, though the two are not related.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2003
Finding that about one in 10 adult Americans suffer from chronic kidney disease, researchers have called upon patients and doctors to look for early signs so they can prevent potentially fatal complications. Researchers from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health said doctors should be attuned to the early signs, which can be gleaned from routine blood and urine tests. Early treatment can stave off heart attacks or the need for dialysis or kidney transplants. "At the early stages, there are a number of measures that can slow the progression of kidney diseases and possibly improve quality of life and decrease the risk of heart attacks," said Dr. Josef Coresh, lead author of a study that appears in this month's American Journal of Kidney Disease.
NEWS
By Athima Chansanchai and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | March 31, 2003
Sheila Parsons is a big fan of actor Danny Glover and stood in line to get his autograph yesterday. But she wasn't braving frigid, wet conditions at the Inner Harbor just for him, and he wasn't there promoting a new movie. Both participated in Maryland's first Kidney Walk at Rash Field, an event organized by the National Kidney Foundation that drew about 200 people. Some of them, such as Parsons, are suffering from kidney disease and awaiting transplants. "You are truly, truly the faithful out here," Glover said, addressing the crowd huddled beneath a wooden pagoda, before the walk.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | November 2, 2006
Dr. Mackenzie Walser, a noted nephrologist and professor of medicine who wrote widely on the nutritional management of kidney disease, died of a brain tumor Saturday at his Timonium home. He was 82. Dr. Walser was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and raised in New Canaan, Conn. He graduated in 1940 from Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, N.H. He earned a bachelor's degree from Yale University in 1944, graduated from Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1948 and completed his internship and residency at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2011
Dr. Jimmy Boyd Zachary, a retired Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center physician who was a pioneer in the study of kidney disease, died of cancer Feb. 15 at Gilchrist Hospice Care. He was 83 and lived in Ruxton. Born and raised in Pontotoc County, Miss., Dr. Zachary earned bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Mississippi. He received his M.D. at Harvard Medical School and came to Baltimore as an intern and then chief resident at the old Baltimore City Hospitals, now Bayview.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | January 18, 1994
Q: Our company doctor told me during a routine physical examination that there was protein in my urine. I have never had any serious illnesses and feel perfectly well now. What is the significance of protein in the urine?A: Protein in the urine (proteinuria) can be benign, but it is also an extremely sensitive marker of kidney disease. Factors that distinguish between benign and significant proteinuria include its persistence, the amount of protein in the urine and the presence or absence of other abnormalities in the urine.
NEWS
By Medical Tribune News Service | January 31, 1991
Despite suffering from kidney disease in greater numbers, fewer blacks than whites receive transplants or survive them, a leading organ transplant group says.Most donor kidneys, which largely come from whites, are incompatible with blacks because blood types often differ in the two races, according to a report by the American Society of Transplant Physicians.Blacks also often lack the medical insurance needed to pay for a transplant, hospital costs, medicines and follow-up care, the report said.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
We were pleased to read the article "Sister of 11-year-old with diabetes raises $110K for research " (April 1), in The Sun because of our own family's experience with type 1 diabetes. Over 10 years ago, our grandson was diagnosed with the disease and has grown up so much faster than his brother or his sister who do not have it. We have watched him under our daughter's supervision endure a daily regimen involving checking blood sugar and multiple insulin injections daily so he can live.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is proposing a 10 percent cut to the Medicare payment for dialysis - a proposed reduction that is ill-advised, to say the least ("Medicare cuts hit dialysis hard," July 15). Dangerous would be a far better term. Dialysis providers faced with this eventuality will of necessity have to cut back. Each cutback will result in a reduction of quality care. I am living with kidney failure. Dialysis has been my life-saving therapy for more than 13 years.
NEWS
July 15, 2013
On July 1, Medicare proposed a dramatic and disappointing reduction in dialysis payment rates that could jeopardize local dialysis care. As a dialysis professional I am responsible for some of the sickest and most vulnerable patients in Maryland, those with kidney failure who depend on dialysis three times each week to stay alive. Most people on dialysis, regardless of age, have Medicare. The new Medicare cuts worry me. The cost impact could result in reduced dialysis services and clinic closures at a time when kidney disease is rising in our state.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Laurel resident Dr. Deidra Crews received the Greater Baltimore Community and Patients Service Committee All-Star Award at the National Kidney Foundation of Maryland's annual Volunteer Awards Reception at the Baltimore Museum of Industry. Sponsored by Mid-Atlantic Nephrology Associates, the Living Legacy Foundation of Maryland and Johns Hopkins Medicine Comprehensive Transplant Center, the event recognized individuals and organizations for their time and hard work on behalf of the Foundation.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | June 6, 2013
During her first attempt at rappelling down the 28-story face of the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel last summer, Mays Chapel resident Barbara Case understandably focused on making it down safely. Now, with last year's experience as reassurance that her rappel will again end safely, Case plans to take in the scenic Inner Harbor view and enjoy the atmosphere as she descends onto the hotel pool deck this weekend. “Going down, it was a beautiful day, and the windows are reflective,” Case said about last year's rappel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2013
Lisa Graff, an author who teaches children's literature at McDaniel College, can't read a map to save her life. She's terrible at crossword puzzles, has trouble telling her left hand from her right and uses far too many exclamation points. While she was growing up in California in the 1980s in the shadow of a brilliant older brother, young Lisa became convinced that she had no special talent. She thought of herself as utterly, unspectacularly average. But Graff must have been good at something, because she grew up to become a respected author of children's books: six for younger students and a seventh for teens under the pseudonym Isla Neal.
NEWS
September 18, 1992
Chester L. Finn, a retired senior investigator for the Baltimore Department of Transit and Traffic who was also the traffic announcer on WFBR-AM and founder of a group to aid kidney-disease patients, died Monday at Baltimore County General Hospital of heart failure. He was 67.Services for the Breitwert Avenue resident will be held today at 11 a.m. at the Hubbard Funeral Home, 4107 Wilkens Ave.Known as Mickey, Mr. Finn began working for city in 1967 in the Bureau of Water Supply of the Public Works Department.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Alaska, a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering kidney failure, zoo officials said. The bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
FEATURES
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
"Alaska," a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering from kidney failure, zoo officials said. The female bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
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