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By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 21, 2005
CHICAGO -- A drug for use in treating patients with advanced kidney cancer won government approval yesterday. The Food and Drug Administration said the drug, Nexavar, is a significant step forward. The current standard treatment for kidney cancer - immune therapy with interferon or interleukin-2 - has modest benefits and can be extremely toxic. Nexavar, developed at the University of Chicago, has few side effects, and some patients who started taking it more than two years ago are doing well, researchers said yesterday.
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FEATURES
By Louis Krauss, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Cathy Teodosio, a 55-year-old special education teacher, has been biking in fundraising events for more than two decades, but next weekend's Ride to Conquer Cancer will be especially personal for her. In April 2013, her father, Joseph Teodosio, was diagnosed with kidney cancer. Soon after moving from Connecticut to Fells Point in October, she heard about the event - which benefits Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Sibley Memorial and Suburban Hospitals. "It took several months with the move and his recovery for me to actually sign up for something like this, but I knew I had to do it," Cathy Teodosio said.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 16, 2005
ORLANDO, Fla. - Two new drugs are offering hope to people with kidney cancer, which until now has mostly defied treatment, doctors said. Results of clinical trials, announced last weekend at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, suggest that the drugs - one developed by Pfizer and the other by Bayer and Onyx Pharmaceuticals - should eventually win approval, kidney cancer specialists and analysts said. "We've reached the point in the illness where the door is open, so to speak," said kidney cancer specialist Dr. Ronald M. Bukowski of the Cleveland Clinic.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
If there ever was a right time to be diagnosed with breast cancer , Beth Thompson found one. In February 2006, the pea-size tumor in her right breast was too small for a clinical trial of Herceptin, a targeted therapy that had proved effective in advanced stages of the aggressive cancer Thompson had. She underwent a lumpectomy and chemotherapy. When the cancer continued to show signs of growth, she had a double mastectomy. But soon after, her doctor, buoyed by promising trial results, encouraged her to consider Herceptin, developed by Genetech to target the protein that fuels the cancer's growth.
NEWS
August 15, 1992
Kenji Nakagami, a prominent novelist known for startling, sensual prose about Japan's outcast class, died Wednesday of kidney cancer. He was 46. An official at Hibi Memorial Hospital in the town of Nachi-Katsuura in Mr. Nakagami's home state of Wakayama, 310 miles southwest of Tokyo, said the writer died early Wednesday.
NEWS
December 28, 1992
* Rev. James Lyke,Rev. James Lyke, the Atlanta archbishop who was the nation's highest ranking black Roman Catholic clergyman, died at home yesterday of cancer. The 53-year-old prelate became archbishop in 1991, replacing the former top-ranking black Catholic, Eugene Marino, who resigned after church officials learned of his romance with a young woman. The spiritual leader of 185,000 Catholics in north Georgia, Archbishop Lyke was diagnosed with kidney cancer in April.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 4, 2004
Nicotine studies show memory enhancement For many years, doctors have been trying to harness the memory-enhancing powers of nicotine without exposing people to the carcinogenic chemicals in cigarette smoke. A nicotine patch could be the answer. Several studies have shown that nicotine can improve attentiveness among patients with attention deficit disorders, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease and mild to moderate Alzheimer's. Now, a small study from Duke University researchers suggests that low-dose nicotine patches might relieve the mildest form of memory loss, a common condition called age-associated memory impairment -- often referred to as "senior moments."
NEWS
May 11, 1997
Alan Gussow, 65, a fine-arts professor who painted and protected nature, died of cancer Monday in Piermont, N.Y. He persuaded the National Park Service to name artists-in-residence parks and became the first one, serving at the Cape Cod National Seashore.Jerome Alden, 76, a television, stage and screenwriter whose works included two plays about the life of Theodore Roosevelt, died of kidney cancer May 4 in New York. He wrote "Bully" in 1977 and "Teddy and Alice" in 1987.Charles Schlaifer, 87, an advertising and movie executive, and an advocate for improved mental health care, died Monday in New York.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2000
Johns Hopkins researchers who devised the first test for hereditary colon cancer say they have developed a technique that will raise the test's accuracy to 100 percent. The technology should also improve testing for other diseases that run in families, including hereditary breast cancer, kidney cancer and cystic fibrosis, doctors say. A report on the findings appears in today's issue of the journal Nature. Dr. Bert Vogelstein, a researcher at the Johns Hopkins Oncology Center, said the finding was born of frustration after his laboratory's discovery in 1995 of the major genes responsible for hereditary colon cancer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
Jack C. Zoppo, a Baltimore City Fire Department lieutenant honored several times for rescues during a 19-year career, died of kidney cancer Saturday at his home in Stewartstown, Pa. The former Parkville resident was 45. "He was a man of courage in all aspects of his life," Fire Chief William J. Goodwin Jr. said yesterday. "He was a good leader and took care of the guys he worked with, his family and his friends. He also took his life and his job very seriously." Born in Baltimore and raised in Parkville, he graduated from Parkville High School in 1976 and served in the Air Force as a fire protection specialist.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 8, 2011
Dr. Fray Francis Marshall, a urologist and former Johns Hopkins professor who developed surgical technique for the treatment of kidney cancer, died of cancer Dec. 2 at the Atlanta Hospice. He was 67 and had lived in Ruxton before moving to Georgia in 1998. "Fray was an incredibly creative and imaginative physician who saw the problems and went searching for the answers," said Emory University Chancellor, Dr. Michael M.E. Johns, a close friend who is the former Johns Hopkins School of Medicine dean.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | April 9, 2010
Garrett Louis Nelson, a first-grade student at Grange Elementary School whose courageous two-year battle with kidney cancer inspired young and old alike, died Sunday of Wilms disease at his Dundalk home. He was 7. Garrett, the son of John A. and Gwen R. Nelson, was born in Baltimore and raised in his family's Dundalk home. "Garrett loved to make everybody laugh and smile. He was a huge Orioles and Ravens fan. When he was 3, he began playing soccer," said his father, who is the owner of Holabird Metal Products, a metal fabrication company.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,jeff.barker@baltsun.com | December 25, 2008
COLLEGE PARK - Gloria Friedgen's most immediate goal was to provide a memorable, spirit-boosting outing for a Howard County boy with kidney cancer. The wife of football coach Ralph Friedgen believed that Cole Sterry - an ebullient, sports-loving 7-year-old named for Maryland's Cole Field House - would get a charge out of hanging out with Terrapins football players during a sunny afternoon practice in September. She didn't know the relationship between the boy and the team would extend beyond a single day's practice and into the regular season and beyond.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | June 4, 2007
CHICAGO -- A new drug looks poised to become the first effective treatment for liver cancer, one of the deadliest and most common cancers in the world, whose incidence has been rising in the United States, doctors said yesterday. In a large clinical trial, the drug, called Nexavar, extended the lives of patients by almost three months, or 44 percent. While that is far from a cure, experts say it represents a breakthrough after years of efforts to find a drug that works. "We did not have anything for these patients," said Dr. Josep M. Llovet, one of the principal investigators in the trial.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | March 21, 2006
James F. McCadden, a former partner in a Baltimore County law firm who was also a licensed captain and pilot, died of kidney cancer March 14 at his Towson home. He was 64. Mr. McCadden was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. After graduating from Calvert Hall College High School in 1959, he was an Army military policeman in Germany for three years. After returning to Baltimore, he was on the staff of U.S. Sen. Daniel B. Brewster in the 1960s. He graduated from Essex Community College and earned his law degree from the University of Baltimore Law School in 1968.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 21, 2005
CHICAGO -- A drug for use in treating patients with advanced kidney cancer won government approval yesterday. The Food and Drug Administration said the drug, Nexavar, is a significant step forward. The current standard treatment for kidney cancer - immune therapy with interferon or interleukin-2 - has modest benefits and can be extremely toxic. Nexavar, developed at the University of Chicago, has few side effects, and some patients who started taking it more than two years ago are doing well, researchers said yesterday.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 8, 2011
Dr. Fray Francis Marshall, a urologist and former Johns Hopkins professor who developed surgical technique for the treatment of kidney cancer, died of cancer Dec. 2 at the Atlanta Hospice. He was 67 and had lived in Ruxton before moving to Georgia in 1998. "Fray was an incredibly creative and imaginative physician who saw the problems and went searching for the answers," said Emory University Chancellor, Dr. Michael M.E. Johns, a close friend who is the former Johns Hopkins School of Medicine dean.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 16, 2005
ORLANDO, Fla. - Two new drugs are offering hope to people with kidney cancer, which until now has mostly defied treatment, doctors said. Results of clinical trials, announced last weekend at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, suggest that the drugs - one developed by Pfizer and the other by Bayer and Onyx Pharmaceuticals - should eventually win approval, kidney cancer specialists and analysts said. "We've reached the point in the illness where the door is open, so to speak," said kidney cancer specialist Dr. Ronald M. Bukowski of the Cleveland Clinic.
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