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HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | November 11, 2009
When 10-year-old Sean Menard's battle with kidney disease took a turn for the worse, his former kindergarten teacher's aide offered him one of her kidneys. When it turned out she was not a good match, her husband volunteered. His act of kindness not only enabled Sean to get the kidney he desperately needed, but it became a vital link in a chain of four donors who would give their healthy kidneys to four people in need of new organs. The University of Maryland Medical Center announced the series of donations Tuesday, which marked its first kidney exchange.
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SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Three weeks after receiving a kidney transplant from his brother, a former Ravens' player, Chris Kemoeatu has heard all of the wisecracks. "Everyone jokes about me having a Ravens' kidney," said Kemoeatu, 31, who played seven years with the Pittsburgh Steelers. "But hey, I can live with that. " He'll have to. On Thursday, Kemoeatu (key-moy-AH-too) and his brother, Ma'ake (ma-AH-kay), spoke at the University Of Maryland Medical Center of the unusual circumstances surrounding their Aug. 27 surgeries there.
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NEWS
By Yeganeh June Torbati, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2010
For months, Valerie Eigner saw her daughter, Jamie Conway, endure exhausting dialysis treatments three days a week, on top of a full-time work schedule that sometimes left her so fatigued she would return from her job and collapse on her bed. The lupus first diagnosed in 2004 had spread to Conway's kidneys, and doctors knew by spring that she would need a transplant. When Eigner heard the news, there was no question of what she would do to help. "When we found out in April that she needs a kidney, I knew I'm going to be tested," said Eigner.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
To see 2-year-old James Paglio of Fort Meade playing on the floor, his cherry-red cheeks glowing as he tows a toy truck behind a sofa, you'd never know that he suffers from kidney disease so severe he often needs up to 15 medications a day and has been on dialysis since October. His warm, crinkling eyes belie how he once feared strangers - all too many have come to perform painful medical procedures. To see 19-year-old Taylor Chappell of Glen Burnie, you'd never know that doctors have deemed her an ideal donor match for James, though the two are not related.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | March 30, 2010
At 71, with more than two years of a punishing schedule of dialysis under his belt, William Kavadias thought a new kidney would never come. Transplants, he assumed, were for the young. But last year, Kavadias' life-saving chance came in an unlikely package - a kidney from an older donor became available. The transplant was successful, and today he's feeling great. It's the kind of surgery that many surgeons won't bother to perform. While kidneys from older donors are not suitable for younger patients, they can save seniors' lives, say some transplant surgeons.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Three weeks after receiving a kidney transplant from his brother, a former Ravens' player, Chris Kemoeatu has heard all of the wisecracks. "Everyone jokes about me having a Ravens' kidney," said Kemoeatu, 31, who played seven years with the Pittsburgh Steelers. "But hey, I can live with that. " He'll have to. On Thursday, Kemoeatu (key-moy-AH-too) and his brother, Ma'ake (ma-AH-kay), spoke at the University Of Maryland Medical Center of the unusual circumstances surrounding their Aug. 27 surgeries there.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
To see 2-year-old James Paglio of Fort Meade playing on the floor, his cherry-red cheeks glowing as he tows a toy truck behind a sofa, you'd never know that he suffers from kidney disease so severe he often needs up to 15 medications a day and has been on dialysis since October. His warm, crinkling eyes belie how he once feared strangers - all too many have come to perform painful medical procedures. To see 19-year-old Taylor Chappell of Glen Burnie, you'd never know that doctors have deemed her an ideal donor match for James, though the two are not related.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | March 23, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- The poorest Marylanders with kidney disease would be treated free, but others needing treatment would pay part of the cost under a bill passed yesterday by the House of Delegates.The bill would impose a charge on those who make more than $11,000a year or whose assets exceed $12,500.Those patients would pay 5 percent income or assets above these figures for dialysis treat- ments.The legislation seeks to provide coverage free or at low cost for the neediest of 4,200 Marylanders now participating in the program, said Delegate Brian K. McHale, D-Baltimore, a member of the House Environmental Matters Committee, which crafted the bill.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Columnist | December 3, 2006
Of course the five-kidney, 10-patient transplant extravaganza at Johns Hopkins Hospital got on the CBS Evening News last month. A dozen surgeons worked all day to fulfill a complex, "my relative will give you a kidney if your relative gives me a kidney" contract that pushed the bounds of clinical logistics. "A huge medical story," said Katie Couric. "A surgical square dance," said CBS correspondent Sharyn Alfonsi. A "triumph of the human spirit," transplant director Dr. Robert Montgomery told The Sun. And yet the heroics barely skimmed the ocean of desperate people needing kidneys.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | August 8, 1995
LAUREL -- After 25 years of suffering from diabetes, and after operations on both his eyes and both his feet, Jack Salter was given this grim choice by his doctors a few months ago: He could undergo a kidney transplant, or he could die within 90 days.Salter, 61, trains horses at Laurel racetrack. He's been doing it for 40 years. When he went to work a few days after his doctor's pronouncement, he bumped into Karen Young, who's a mutuel teller at the track. They've known each other for a couple of years, the way folks do who work at the same place and make small talk when they see each other.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
When John Davis' kidney began failing in January, his girlfriend's mother decided to donate one of her kidneys to help save his life. That the two weren't actually a "match" - meaning Davis' body would never accept her kidney - didn't matter. In a groundbreaking program at Johns Hopkins Hospital that is as much about nationwide networking as it is medical innovation, kidney transplants are being arranged not through isolated pairings of patient and donor, but through longer and longer chains of individuals who don't even know each other.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Julie Stitt begged her husband for years to let her donate her kidney as he spent nearly a decade in dialysis, through two failed transplants. Last year, he relented. It was a difficult decision. Her husband, Chuck, didn't want her to make the sacrifice. And she knew her father, Richard Kern, would need a transplant eventually as nearly five decades of diabetes wore on his kidneys. That time came about a month after her decision. "It was a hard place," Julie Stitt said. "I wanted to give to my husband, but I knew my father would need one. " She volunteered to donate to a stranger, getting her husband on a donation exchange waiting list.
NEWS
July 23, 2013
The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is proposing a 10 percent cut to the Medicare payment for dialysis - a proposed reduction that is ill-advised, to say the least ("Medicare cuts hit dialysis hard," July 15). Dangerous would be a far better term. Dialysis providers faced with this eventuality will of necessity have to cut back. Each cutback will result in a reduction of quality care. I am living with kidney failure. Dialysis has been my life-saving therapy for more than 13 years.
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Laurel resident Dr. Deidra Crews received the Greater Baltimore Community and Patients Service Committee All-Star Award at the National Kidney Foundation of Maryland's annual Volunteer Awards Reception at the Baltimore Museum of Industry. Sponsored by Mid-Atlantic Nephrology Associates, the Living Legacy Foundation of Maryland and Johns Hopkins Medicine Comprehensive Transplant Center, the event recognized individuals and organizations for their time and hard work on behalf of the Foundation.
NEWS
By Jon Meoli, jmeoli@tribune.com | June 6, 2013
During her first attempt at rappelling down the 28-story face of the Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel last summer, Mays Chapel resident Barbara Case understandably focused on making it down safely. Now, with last year's experience as reassurance that her rappel will again end safely, Case plans to take in the scenic Inner Harbor view and enjoy the atmosphere as she descends onto the hotel pool deck this weekend. “Going down, it was a beautiful day, and the windows are reflective,” Case said about last year's rappel.
HEALTH
By Alison Matas, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
The first Marylander to succumb to rabies since 1976 developed the virus through a kidney transplant that took place more than a year before the Army veteran died of the disease in February, national health and defense officials said Friday. Tests performed by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since the Marylander's death showed that the Florida organ donor, a 20-year-old Air Force service member, died of rabies, and the same type of rabies was found in both the donor and the kidney recipient.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 2, 1991
MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay -- Word got around after Pedro Riveroli, a poor laborer, sold his kidney to a wealthy merchant, and soon he had other offers. He sold his daughter's kidney to an ailing millionaire and his son-in-law's kidney to a retired teacher.Mr. Riveroli was bargaining away the kidneys of two jobless friends last week when police detained him and 19 others in what may be Latin America's first official crackdown on commerce in human organs.The case, dramatic evidence of the economic desperation reigning across the continent, has set off a debate over the ethics of organ donations in societies plagued by disparities in wealth.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
Ellen Jones, wife of Union Bridge Mayor Perry L. Jones Jr., is recuperating at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore after receiving a kidney from her mother, Irene Brown of Westminster, in transplant surgery Wednesday.Mrs. Brown, 63, was moved to a private room in the hospital shortly after the surgery. Mrs. Jones was moved to a semi-private room Friday. Both were in fair condition yesterday."The doctors expect her to make a full recovery, her and her mother," Mr. Jones said Friday.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 20, 2013
Dr. Gary S. Hill, an internationally renowned renal pathologist and the former chief of pathology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, died Tuesday from lung cancer. He was 74. Dr. Hill pioneered a new technique for biopsies of tissue, in addition to developing a system for identifying lupus and how far the disease had progressed in a patient. Colleagues and family described him as a man greatly interested in conversation and friends, traits that translated into the way he moved forward in his career.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Alaska, a Maryland Zoo polar bear that had been rescued from a Mexican circus a decade ago, was euthanized Tuesday after suffering kidney failure, zoo officials said. The bear had been confiscated in Puerto Rico by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service agents in March 2002 after the circus abandoned her there. When she arrived at the zoo soon after, animal keepers found that she was deaf, overweight and had poor muscle tone, but they nursed her to health and developed a training program using hand signals and other visual cues.
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