Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKickstarter
IN THE NEWS

Kickstarter

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Natasha Brown-Wainwright, 41, still calls it The Twitter. She doesn't upload photos to Facebook without her 16-year-old daughter's help. Her grasp of the Web is fuzzy. But last summer, she decided to get a clue and join the latest, buzziest social media bandwagon around, Kickstarter, a site that connects entrepreneurs with small-scale donors. Her brittle business, barely making a profit after four years, needed a lift, even if it came from a source she still found baffling. "I think people in their 40s are beginning to realize their future is on the Internet, on Twitter, on Kickstarter," she says.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
When Gene Shirokobrod's patients started asking the doctor of physical therapy to come home with them, he decided to find a product to recommend as an alternative for help with back and neck pain. But he couldn't find any product he thought was good enough to recommend, so he set out to make something. Shirokobrod reached out to Corey Fleischer, a mechanical engineer and co-founder of the Baltimore Foundery, to help him create the ARC, a product to relieve back and neck pain and retrain muscle.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | March 15, 2012
Westminster businessman Ellwood "Bunky" Bartlett is like a lot of gamers - he knows what he likes and doesn't like in his games. The difference between Bartlett and most gamers is that in 2007, he won the Mega Millions jackpot, clearing roughly $27 million after taxes. After years of marauding through massive online multi-player games like "World of Warcraft," "Rift" and "EverQuest," Bartlett is embarking on his own quest: to create his dream game. Now all he needs is a mere $1.1 million to get started.
FEATURES
February 3, 2014
Baltimore dad, comic book author and middle school art teacher Michael Bracco couldn't find baby clothes that fit his offbeat, artistic style when his daughter was born. So he designed his own, expanding his successful brand of illustrated T-shirts, Spaghetti Kiss, to include an infant and toddler line, thanks to a $2,000 Kickstarter campaign. The sci-fi-inspired designs include a dancing rhino and a robot printed on 100% cotton T's and onesies ($20), available at spaghettikiss.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2011
"I Used to Be Darker" is meant to jump from the blocks at full speed: A 19-year-old discovers that she's pregnant, grabs a knife and exacts devastating revenge on the cad who knocked her up. After she loses her job overseeing bumper cars at an Ocean City arcade, she high-tails it to Baltimore. The film's writer-director, Matt Porterfield, and his co-writer (and partner), Amy Belk, pack a midsummer day's nightmare into a vivid streak of incidents. It could be the perfect lift-off for the rest of the story – and no one doubts Porterfield's ability to pull the sequence off. "Hamilton" and "Putty Hill," his first two features, demonstrated his skill at delivering keen emotion on the run. But Porterfield, who is shooting the rest of the script in Baltimore, has bet the completion of "I Used to Be Darker" on his ability to raise $40,000 by Aug. 13 through Kickstarter, the website for creative entrepreneurs.
FEATURES
February 3, 2014
Baltimore dad, comic book author and middle school art teacher Michael Bracco couldn't find baby clothes that fit his offbeat, artistic style when his daughter was born. So he designed his own, expanding his successful brand of illustrated T-shirts, Spaghetti Kiss, to include an infant and toddler line, thanks to a $2,000 Kickstarter campaign. The sci-fi-inspired designs include a dancing rhino and a robot printed on 100% cotton T's and onesies ($20), available at spaghettikiss.com.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 13, 2012
"The future belongs to crowds. "  - Don DeLillo, Mao II If the 20th century version of video game marketing is attempting to observe what customers wanted, than the 21st has become a time about flat-out asking them. Steam, Valve's online gaming store and community hub, announced "Greenlight," a crowdsourcing-inspired move aimed at letting the users have more say in what games are available to buy and play on the service. "The community should be deciding what gets released," Valve announced.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | May 8, 2012
Adam Raby, a Maryland native and UMBC graduate now living in Chicago, came up with the idea for the CushPad while watching his girlfriend fumble with his precious iPad, occasionally dropping it. He also got tired of looking for ways to prop the device up while he sat on the couch or in bed while trying to use it. So last fall, Raby, 29, tried his hand at building an encasement of foam that snugly holds an iPad. His prototype worked well, and he had a short run of 100 CushPads made by two Chicago manufacturers (hooray for American manufacturing!
BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
When Gene Shirokobrod's patients started asking the doctor of physical therapy to come home with them, he decided to find a product to recommend as an alternative for help with back and neck pain. But he couldn't find any product he thought was good enough to recommend, so he set out to make something. Shirokobrod reached out to Corey Fleischer, a mechanical engineer and co-founder of the Baltimore Foundery, to help him create the ARC, a product to relieve back and neck pain and retrain muscle.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Earth Starter is having the sort of year startups dream of. The company, founded by University of Maryland graduates, sells a kit designed to make gardening easy in small spaces. You lay the 4-by-6-foot mat on your plot of dirt, push the provided seed balls through the mat's holes and water them with the included drip irrigation system. Since Jan. 1: •The mats came to market — for sale online, up to $80. •The company won first place, and $52,500, at a national business competition held at the University of Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2013
Jason Perkail of Baltimore and Dimitri Furman of Gaithersburg are audiophiles, former DJs with a passion for high fidelity. They never thought they'd be manufacturers. But one led to the other. In the space of five whirlwind months, they designed a high-end hi-fi system, raised nearly seven times as much money on crowdfunding site Kickstarter as they originally asked for and are now setting up a production facility in Gaithersburg. Their company, Tubecore Audio, has 292 orders to fill for Kickstarter supporters who rushed to get a below-wholesale price for a product that will retail at $599.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
Earth Starter is having the sort of year startups dream of. The company, founded by University of Maryland graduates, sells a kit designed to make gardening easy in small spaces. You lay the 4-by-6-foot mat on your plot of dirt, push the provided seed balls through the mat's holes and water them with the included drip irrigation system. Since Jan. 1: •The mats came to market — for sale online, up to $80. •The company won first place, and $52,500, at a national business competition held at the University of Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2013
One of the delights of summer is the HBO documentary series executive producer Sheila Nevins delivers. I have only seen the first two films this year, but I like them both. I love "Pussy Riot: A Punk Prayer," which launches the series at 9 tonight. It's a look inside the feminist Russian art collective, its "Punk Prayer" protest in a Moscow cathedral and the trial that followed. The film reminded me as nothing else has in the last 40 some years what it felt like to be 18 years old in 1968 and hear the siren call of a cultural revolution.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
Pink flamingos peer down from the dining room walls of Mink Stole's apartment -- playful reminders of the notorious 1972 film that helped launch Stole's career as an actress, alongside Divine, John Waters and the rest of the Dreamlanders. While Stole says she has a copy of "Pink Flamingos" "somewhere," she hasn't seen the film -- or many of the other Waters' productions she co-starred in -- for some time. The past few years, Stole has been focusing on her budding career as a singer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2013
Seated at a downtown coffee shop last week, Victoria Vox quickly noticed the table was wobbly and uneven. Rather than ignore the minor nuisance, the 34-year-old singer-songwriter took the newspaper she walked in with, folded up a few pages and stuck it under the table's leg. She punctuated the correction with a shrug. "I fix things," Vox said nonchalantly. Born Victoria Davitt, Vox's do-it-herself mentality has served her well since May 2003, when she quit her managerial job at New York & Company in the mall of her hometown, Green Bay, Wis. Since then, music has been her only career.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2012
Imagine, with a few finger flicks on a smartphone app, you can learn whether you'll be getting zucchini or tomatoes, strawberries or potatoes, from a Maryland farm each week, then browse for home-spun recipes and connect with other like-minded consumers. One Straw Farm, one of Maryland's largest independent agricultural operations, wants to build that app — and bring a new level of tech savvy to community-supported agriculture. Joan and Drew Norman, the owners of the farm, believe they can craft mobile apps to make their work more efficient and better connect with their customers.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2013
Jason Perkail of Baltimore and Dimitri Furman of Gaithersburg are audiophiles, former DJs with a passion for high fidelity. They never thought they'd be manufacturers. But one led to the other. In the space of five whirlwind months, they designed a high-end hi-fi system, raised nearly seven times as much money on crowdfunding site Kickstarter as they originally asked for and are now setting up a production facility in Gaithersburg. Their company, Tubecore Audio, has 292 orders to fill for Kickstarter supporters who rushed to get a below-wholesale price for a product that will retail at $599.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
Pink flamingos peer down from the dining room walls of Mink Stole's apartment -- playful reminders of the notorious 1972 film that helped launch Stole's career as an actress, alongside Divine, John Waters and the rest of the Dreamlanders. While Stole says she has a copy of "Pink Flamingos" "somewhere," she hasn't seen the film -- or many of the other Waters' productions she co-starred in -- for some time. The past few years, Stole has been focusing on her budding career as a singer.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | July 24, 2012
One Straw Farm , one of the biggest independent farms in Maryland and a familiar presence at farmers' markets across the Baltimore region, is on a quest to build two iPhone apps that will help modernize its business and better connect with its customers. Joan and Drew Norman, the owners of the farm, have gotten hooked on the iPhone and believe they can use it to make their work on the farm more efficient and better share and connect their customers. They've been farming since 1983 and grow on 175 acres.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dave Gilmore | July 13, 2012
"The future belongs to crowds. "  - Don DeLillo, Mao II If the 20th century version of video game marketing is attempting to observe what customers wanted, than the 21st has become a time about flat-out asking them. Steam, Valve's online gaming store and community hub, announced "Greenlight," a crowdsourcing-inspired move aimed at letting the users have more say in what games are available to buy and play on the service. "The community should be deciding what gets released," Valve announced.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.