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By Kathleen Parker | March 11, 2010
Skipping through the Candy Land of the health care bill, one is tempted to hum a few bars of "Let Me Call You Sweetheart." What a deal. For deal-makers, that is. Not so much for American taxpayers, who have been misled into thinking that the sweetheart deals have been excised. Not only are the deals still there, but they're bigger. And the health care "reform" bill is, consequently, more expensive by billions. Yes, gone (sort of) is the so-called "Cornhusker kickback," extended to Nebraska Sen. Ben Nelson when his 60th vote needed a bit of coaxing.
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BUSINESS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
A federal judge authorized a class-action suit Wednesday against one of the state's largest real estate groups, after a Howard County couple accused it of running a half-million dollar kickback scheme with a title insurance company. A suit filed in Baltimore by home buyers Christine and Patrick Baehr alleges The Creig Northrop Team, which has offices across central Maryland, of illegally accepting payments from Lakeview Title in exchange for sending the firm business. "We are pleased with the court's ruling, and we will continue to to vigorously prosecute this class action on behalf of our clients," said the couple's attorney, Gregory T. Lawrence of Baltimore law firm Conti Fenn & Lawrence.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 23, 2012
Though just two Baltimore officers accused of taking kickbacks from Majestic Auto Repair are on trial this week in federal court, witnesses, prosecutors and attorneys have broadly described police behaving badly . One of the defendants falsified police reports to curry favor with a woman, and he let a drunken driver who had just crashed his car stumble into a liquor store, according to witnesses. Another officer, who previously pleaded guilty, falsely reported his personal vehicle stolen because he couldn't make the payments, according to one witness, while another officer used the Rosedale body shop for on-duty rendezvous with women, a defense attorney alleged.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2013
A Morgan State University professor accused of defrauding the National Science Foundation also paid out Department of Defense grant money to students in exchange for kickbacks, federal prosecutors allege in a court filing. Manoj Kumar Jha, director of the university's Center for Advanced Transportation and Infrastructure Engineering Research, handed stipend checks to students at the university, the document said, but demanded they pay part of the money back to him. The students were not asked to do any research in return, prosecutors wrote.
NEWS
By Andrew Samuel and Jeremy Schwartz | March 1, 2011
When 17 Baltimore City police officers were arrested last week for steering towing business to a non-authorized company, it was hardly surprising to economists. In fact, most economists would predict that such "corruption" would be inevitable in Baltimore's highly regulated towing market. What may be surprising to some is that such kickbacks may contribute, in a way, to economic efficiency. Baltimore city runs a "medallion system," which gives authorized towing companies exclusive rights over police-dispatched tows and illegally parked vehicles.
BUSINESS
October 12, 1990
Two former employees of defense contractors have been accused of soliciting and accepting bribes for information on military subcontracts, a U.S. attorney said.Charged were Joseph L. Ritchey, 45, of Morgan Hill, Ca., a former deputy program manager for a California-based defense contractor, and Sumner Louis Barton, 68, of San Jose, Ca., a former consultant to AAI of Cockeysville.Each has been charged with one count of soliciting and accepting $2,000 in kickbacks for inside information about federal subcontracts.
BUSINESS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | January 10, 1991
A former Bata Shoe Co. purchasing agent pleaded guilty today to a federal felony count of soliciting and accepting kickbacks from suppliers on a Defense Department boot contract.Bell Container Corp., of Newark, N.J., and Kurt Faulhammer, 49, owner and president of K&R Fabrics, in Wilbraham, Mass., also pleaded guilty today to felony charges of paying kickbacks to the purchasing agent, Alvin Grieninger, 58, of Havre de Grace, in return for orders for boxes and fleece that Bata used to make and ship cold-weather boots to the military.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | June 29, 1993
A Miami man admitted yesterday to soliciting kickbacks from a construction company that was renovating nursing homes in Millersville and Denton.Edwin J. Mason, 64, pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to one count of interstate transportation of stolen property. Chief Judge Walter E. Black Jr. set sentencing for Oct. 1.Under federal guidelines, Mason could receive eight to 21 months in prison, depending on whether Judge Black determines that he received more than $120,000 in kickbacks and other factors.
BUSINESS
By KENNETH HARNEY | December 4, 2005
It's one of American real estate's seamier practices, and it's almost impossible for consumers to detect: kickbacks and sweetheart payoffs among realty agents, title and escrow companies, lawyers and lenders for referrals of homebuyers' mortgage or closing services. Now the federal government is mounting its most aggressive campaign in decades to stamp out illegal referral-fee schemes. Though it hasn't attracted widespread attention, the government's anti-kickback effort thus far this year has racked up six times the number of out-of-court settlements with alleged violators that it did in 2004.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons | May 3, 1991
A former purchasing agent for the Bata Shoe Co. was sentenced yesterday in federal court to a month in prison, two months in a community facility and two months in home confinement for soliciting kickbacks on government contracts for military boots.Alvin Grieninger, 58, of Havre de Grace pleaded guilty Jan. 10 to taking kickbacks totaling $37,652.54 between 1985 and 1989 to influence his choice of subcontractors for materials while he was purchasing agent for the Belcamp contractor.As part of the sentence, U.S. District Judge Marvin J. Garbis fined Mr. Grieninger $10,000 and ordered him to pay the $3,685.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2013
A Howard County couple is suing one of the largest residential real estate brokerages in the state and a Columbia title company for more than $11 million, alleging that the firms had financial ties that violated federal law. The case is a proposed class action that could involve thousands of plaintiffs, all home buyers who bought a home with the Creig Northrop Team of Long & Foster Real Estate since 2000 and used a settlement firm called Lakeview Title...
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | April 30, 2013
The most common complaint from people who email me about my columns is that the federal government is horrible: Too big and growing too fast, too corrupt and wasteful, and providing too many benefits to too many Americans. If we just shrink the government, they claim, the economy will boom. Unfortunately, readers often apply these critiques to governmental spending so insignificant as to barely matter. Grants to ACORN or for the so-called "Obama phone" program are so minuscule they're laughable, no matter how incessantly the conservative media echo chamber reports and re-reports on these so-called "scandals.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
A former high-ranking official at the Maryland Department of Veterans Affairs has been accused of running a kickback scheme from his state office, allegedly fabricating military achievements and disability claims in exchange for a cut of the resulting government payouts. According to a federal indictment made public Wednesday, David Clark secured $1.4 million in fraudulent payouts over 16 years. An Army veteran, Clark rose to deputy chief of claims at the state agency before retiring in 2011.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Two brothers whose Rosedale auto body shop became the focus of a federal investigation into widespread corruption in the Baltimore Police Department were sentenced to prison Wednesday. Hernan Alexis Moreno, 32, of Rosedale and Edwin Javier Mejia, 29, of Middle River received prison terms of 33 months and two years, respectively, for paying officers to bring them business. The kickbacks scheme was uncovered last year. Their sentences conclude a federal case that sullied the reputation of the Police Department, implicating roughly 60 officers and resulting in 15 being sentenced in federal court to prison terms between eight and 42 months.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 19, 2012
Police officers convicted of a crime in Maryland and sentenced to state prison are typically housed in segregated areas for their safety, far from most other inmates. But those prosecuted in U.S. District Court and sent to federal prison - like the 15 Baltimore officers recently convicted in a kickback scheme - will, for the most part, be thrown in with the rest of the convicts. "Whether [inmates are] high profile, law enforcement, whatever the case may be, we aim to treat them like anybody else," said Chris Burke, a spokesman for the Federal Bureau of Prisons.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2012
A federal judge on Monday ordered Baltimore police Officer Samuel Ocasio to repay a Pennsylvania insurance company more than $1,900 for a fraudulent claim connected to a kickback scheme. A jury convicted Ocasio, 37, of conspiracy and extortion this winter for taking cash from Rosedale's Majestic Auto Repair Shop in exchange for customer referrals in a plot that involved dozens of city officers. He was later sentenced to 18 months in federal prison and ordered to pay the Police Department $1,500 — the amount he accepted in kickbacks from January 2010 to January 2011.
BUSINESS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | April 17, 1991
Bell Container Co. has been fined $100,000 for paying kickbacks on defense contracts to a former purchasing manager at Belcamp, Md.-based Bata Shoe Co.Richard Brateman, Bell Container's vice president, accepted the fine on behalf of the Newark, N.J., box-maker at a sentencing hearing in U.S. District Court in Baltimore.Brateman, on authorization from Bell Container's board of directors, had pleaded guilty on behalf of the company in January to one count of violating the federal Anti-Kickback Act. The fine was recommended by the government in the company's plea bargain.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin | November 30, 1990
Two former Bata Shoe Co. purchasing agents, an out-of-state businessman and a container company were charged yesterday with illegally soliciting or paying kickbacks in connection with government contracts.Accused in documents filed in Baltimore's U.S. District Court were Alvin Grieninger, 58, of Havre de Grace and Zdenek Formanek, 71, of Bel Air, both former employees at the Harford County shoe factory; Kurt Faulhammer, 49, a fabric company owner from New York state; and the Bell Container Corp.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | May 30, 2012
Due to incorrect information from the Maryland U.S. attorney's office, an earlier version of this story listed the wrong figure for the amount the officer was ordered to pay in restitution to insurance companies. An 11th Baltimore police officer was sentenced Wednesday to 42 months in federal prison for accepting illegal kickbacks from a car shop, the Maryland U.S. attorney's office announced. Rodney Cintron, 32, of Middle River, pleaded guilty to conspiracy and extortion in November, admitting that he referred car crash customers to Majestic Auto Repair in exchange for cash and that he falsified insurance claims to pay for repairs on his own car. He was ordered to pay $20,000 restitution to the city police department and more than  $420,000 $20,000 to four insurance companies.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
Officer Rodney Cintron took his car, damaged in an accident, to Majestic Auto Repair in Rosedale on the advice of a colleague, not realizing that the man was getting paid to send him there. When the city police officer found out, he signed on to the scheme, according to court records. That decision four years ago would lead to a federal prison term and the end of his brief career. The U.S. attorney's office for Maryland announced Wednesday that Cintron, 32, had been sentenced to 42 months in prison and was ordered to pay $40,000 in restitution, half to the Police Department and half split among several insurance companies, for accepting kickbacks from the car shop's owners.
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