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By John Murphy and John Murphy,Sun Foreign Reporter | March 8, 2007
DEGANYA A, Israel -- The founders of Israel's oldest kibbutz, Deganya A, battled malaria and searing heat and even repelled an attack by a Syrian tank with Molotov cocktails to defend their communal way of life, a place where each person and every job is regarded as equal. But nearly 100 years after the establishment of Deganya A on the lush shores of the Sea of Galilee, the fourth generation of kibbutz members admitted defeat last month. By an overwhelming majority, kibbutz members voted to shed their socialist, utopian aspirations in favor of a new free market system that empowers the individual, puts more money in members' pockets and, sadly for some, turns their once-unique community into a place much like the rest of the world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2013
House Speaker Michael E. Busch and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller have held on to their respective jobs longer than anyone in Maryland history, but they haven't done it alone. Both are known for top-notch staffs led by politically savvy, resilient women with a gift for smoothing relations between their strong-willed bosses. The importance of Kristin F. Jones and Victoria L. Gruber to the workings of the General Assembly has long been well-known to Annapolis insiders. Gruber has held her job with Miller for seven years; Jones has been on Busch's team for 11-plus years.
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NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Jerusalem Bureau | October 20, 1992
JERUSALEM -- Ever since the big wave of ex-Soviet immigration here, business at the Kibbutz Mizra has been just swine.The kibbutz sells pork. The new immigrants can't get enough of it."Ever since they came, the consumption of pig meat has been going up," said Hadas Senderowicz, manager of the meat-packaging plant near Nazareth.Pork is about as non-kosher as non-Kosher gets. But Kibbutz Mizra has long resisted the outcry of the religious orthodox.Kibbutz Mizra, like most of the collective farms called kibbutzim, was settled by liberal, secular Jews who did not "keep kosher."
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,Sun Foreign Reporter | March 8, 2007
DEGANYA A, Israel -- The founders of Israel's oldest kibbutz, Deganya A, battled malaria and searing heat and even repelled an attack by a Syrian tank with Molotov cocktails to defend their communal way of life, a place where each person and every job is regarded as equal. But nearly 100 years after the establishment of Deganya A on the lush shores of the Sea of Galilee, the fourth generation of kibbutz members admitted defeat last month. By an overwhelming majority, kibbutz members voted to shed their socialist, utopian aspirations in favor of a new free market system that empowers the individual, puts more money in members' pockets and, sadly for some, turns their once-unique community into a place much like the rest of the world.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 12, 2002
KIBBUTZ METZER, Israel - For nearly half a century, this farming collective has stood apart from much of the Arab-Israeli conflict. For all that time, the people here in Israel's north and their Arab neighbors have shared in each other's weddings, funerals and harvests. Yesterday, the members of the kibbutz mourned five people shot to death Sunday by a Palestinian gunman, putting the community's belief in peaceful coexistence to a powerful test. "We're not disappointed by our stand for peace," said Yitzhak Rotem, 57, who found one of the bodies where it lay on a path under a shade tree.
NEWS
By ROBERT RUBY and ROBERT RUBY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
KIBBUTZ MERKHAVYA, Israel -- Nitzam Grossman remembers from the comfort of his living room his Israeli army days in southern Lebanon during the early '90s, dismissed now with a small shrug. It didn't then seem like a war. The last time his kibbutz buried one of its young men because of a combat death was in 1982, he recalled. It was during what Israelis may decide to rename the First Lebanon War. Twenty-four years later, the kibbutz has suffered another combat loss, its first in the Second Lebanon War, accompanied by a round of introspection and worry about whether the future will bring more insecurity than the present.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
Lon Sober is developmentally disabled and doesn't hold a job. Aside from making trips to his parents' place a few minutes away, he rarely goes out alone. But last month, Sober was working in a plastics factory on an Israeli kibbutz, contributing to communal life in a village designed for people with disabilities. He was dancing the night away in a Jerusalem club. His parents, without whom he had never traveled before, were thousands of miles away in Maryland. And Sober, on the whole, loved it. "The supervisor said I was one of the best producers there," he says proudly of his work in the factory.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 20, 2001
KIBBUTZ NIR AM, Israel - As they do once a year, residents of this settlement on the Gaza border gathered in the dining hall Wednesday to commemorate the Holocaust. Miriam Harel, who survived a Nazi concentration camp, lighted six candles at the sundown ceremony, symbolizing the 6 million Jewish victims. Others read names of family members who perished. Leaving the ceremony, they heard loud booms and were told by soldiers that five mortar shells had landed on surrounding fields, apparently fired from the section of the Gaza Strip that Israeli troops had reoccupied the day before and then abandoned under U.S. pressure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 7, 1992
The Westview, one of Baltimore's earliest multiplexes, has recently begun an adventurous art film policy; so ambitious is the theater's management to crack the upscale market that at one point it had "Europa, Europa," "Mediterraneo," "Night on Earth"and "Where Angels Fear to Tred" playing simultaneously. That's a film festival in a bucket.But "For Sasha," the new film at the Westview, isn't an art film. It isn't even close to an art film. In fact, it's an anti-art film.In the original French, its title is "Pour Sasha," but I would call it "Poor Sasha," because poor Sasha is in a turgid, overwhelming and pulpy French romantic melodrama set against a somewhat mythologized version of the Six-Day War. It's derived, moreover, entirely from long-defunct Hollywood formulas; it even has violins at the mushy parts.
NEWS
July 25, 1992
Yaakov Hazan a founder of the Marxist-leaning Hashomer Hatzair kibbutz movement, died Wednesday in Jerusalem. He was 92. Mr. Hazan also helped found and led the socialist Mapam movement and served in Israel's parliament from 1949 to 1973. Mapam is now part of the leftist Meretz bloc that joined the recently elected government of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. The Hashomer Hatzair kibbutzim, or collective farms, remain closer to the original idea of the kibbutz, keeping children in separate houses and retaining collective ownership of property.
NEWS
By ROBERT RUBY and ROBERT RUBY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | July 30, 2006
KIBBUTZ MERKHAVYA, Israel -- Nitzam Grossman remembers from the comfort of his living room his Israeli army days in southern Lebanon during the early '90s, dismissed now with a small shrug. It didn't then seem like a war. The last time his kibbutz buried one of its young men because of a combat death was in 1982, he recalled. It was during what Israelis may decide to rename the First Lebanon War. Twenty-four years later, the kibbutz has suffered another combat loss, its first in the Second Lebanon War, accompanied by a round of introspection and worry about whether the future will bring more insecurity than the present.
NEWS
By Henry Chu and Henry Chu,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2003
JERUSALEM - Israeli soldiers on the lookout for Palestinian militants killed at least six people yesterday - among them an 11-year-old boy - in outbreaks of violence across the West Bank and Gaza Strip, Israeli and Palestinian sources said. Four were killed in three incidents in Gaza that occurred within hours of each other yesterday morning. Palestinian witnesses said that Mahmoud Kayed, 11, and one or two friends were trapping birds near a fence bordering an Israeli kibbutz when Israeli troops saw them and opened fire.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 12, 2002
KIBBUTZ METZER, Israel - For nearly half a century, this farming collective has stood apart from much of the Arab-Israeli conflict. For all that time, the people here in Israel's north and their Arab neighbors have shared in each other's weddings, funerals and harvests. Yesterday, the members of the kibbutz mourned five people shot to death Sunday by a Palestinian gunman, putting the community's belief in peaceful coexistence to a powerful test. "We're not disappointed by our stand for peace," said Yitzhak Rotem, 57, who found one of the bodies where it lay on a path under a shade tree.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 20, 2001
KIBBUTZ NIR AM, Israel - As they do once a year, residents of this settlement on the Gaza border gathered in the dining hall Wednesday to commemorate the Holocaust. Miriam Harel, who survived a Nazi concentration camp, lighted six candles at the sundown ceremony, symbolizing the 6 million Jewish victims. Others read names of family members who perished. Leaving the ceremony, they heard loud booms and were told by soldiers that five mortar shells had landed on surrounding fields, apparently fired from the section of the Gaza Strip that Israeli troops had reoccupied the day before and then abandoned under U.S. pressure.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2000
Lon Sober is developmentally disabled and doesn't hold a job. Aside from making trips to his parents' place a few minutes away, he rarely goes out alone. But last month, Sober was working in a plastics factory on an Israeli kibbutz, contributing to communal life in a village designed for people with disabilities. He was dancing the night away in a Jerusalem club. His parents, without whom he had never traveled before, were thousands of miles away in Maryland. And Sober, on the whole, loved it. "The supervisor said I was one of the best producers there," he says proudly of his work in the factory.
NEWS
By Jessica Lazar and Jessica Lazar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN Contributors to this section; Sun research librarians Paul McCardell, Jean Packard and Andrea Wilson, and news intern Brenda Santamaria, contributed to these articles | April 26, 1998
KIBBUTZ EIN HAROD, Israel - In the rosy light of a March dawn, the fields of the Jezreel Valley slope to the west, quilting the foothills of the Gilboa with an undulating spread of olive trees, sweet-smelling citrus and scarlet anemone.From the veranda outside the dining hall on Kibbutz Ein Harod, the air above the fields already swirls with tractor exhaust and tufts of raw cotton spewed from the combines.H. L. Mencken saw the same bucolic landscape when he visited this experiment in communal living in 1934 and came away most impressed by the early Zionists.
NEWS
By Jessica Lazar and Jessica Lazar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN Contributors to this section; Sun research librarians Paul McCardell, Jean Packard and Andrea Wilson, and news intern Brenda Santamaria, contributed to these articles | April 26, 1998
KIBBUTZ EIN HAROD, Israel - In the rosy light of a March dawn, the fields of the Jezreel Valley slope to the west, quilting the foothills of the Gilboa with an undulating spread of olive trees, sweet-smelling citrus and scarlet anemone.From the veranda outside the dining hall on Kibbutz Ein Harod, the air above the fields already swirls with tractor exhaust and tufts of raw cotton spewed from the combines.H. L. Mencken saw the same bucolic landscape when he visited this experiment in communal living in 1934 and came away most impressed by the early Zionists.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Contributors to this section; Sun research librarians Paul McCardell, Jean Packard and Andrea Wilson, and news intern Brenda Santamaria, contributed to these articles | April 26, 1998
KIBBUTZ HANITA, Israel - On a wooded hill overlooking the Lebanese border, Yona Ben Ezer staked his claim to Palestine a decade before the state of Israel was born.There, on a night in March 1938, he and 400 Jews pitched tents, built a fence around their hastily erected camp and signaled to their Zionist comrades down the Mediterranean coast: "We are here."Two died in clashes with Arabs that first evening, but the pioneers were undaunted. Today, their socialist experiment in collective living chugs on. Ben Ezer need only gaze at that curling sweep of shoreline to see how far the country has come.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF Contributors to this section; Sun research librarians Paul McCardell, Jean Packard and Andrea Wilson, and news intern Brenda Santamaria, contributed to these articles | April 26, 1998
KIBBUTZ HANITA, Israel - On a wooded hill overlooking the Lebanese border, Yona Ben Ezer staked his claim to Palestine a decade before the state of Israel was born.There, on a night in March 1938, he and 400 Jews pitched tents, built a fence around their hastily erected camp and signaled to their Zionist comrades down the Mediterranean coast: "We are here."Two died in clashes with Arabs that first evening, but the pioneers were undaunted. Today, their socialist experiment in collective living chugs on. Ben Ezer need only gaze at that curling sweep of shoreline to see how far the country has come.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich | May 25, 1997
WITH HIS daughter at his side, Fred Edell stood in church on a chilly winter morning and bowed his head to prepare for an ancient rite of initiation.The minister placed one hand on him, then gently splashed his head with water.Even as she celebrated a ceremony that goes back to the earliest days of the Christian church, the Rev. Anita Hendrix was following a tradition of her own.The water she used to anoint Edell, who wanted to be baptized with his 7-year-old daughter, Jessica, wasn't the ordinary kind.
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