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By New York Times News Service | April 18, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sergei Nikitich Khrushchev, son of th Soviet leader whose 1962 confrontation with President John F. Kennedy over Soviet missiles in Cuba brought the world to the brink of nuclear war, expects to walk into a small immigration office in Providence, R.I., tomorrow and become a legal permanent resident of the United States.Sixteen months after the disintegration of the Communist Party and the country his father helped run from its prewar Stalinist days until his ouster in 1964, the 57-year-old engineer-turned-political-scientist and his wife, Valentina, expect to receive green cards, or alien-residents cards.
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NEWS
April 14, 2008
BURT GLINN, 82 Noted photojournalist Burt Glinn, a photojournalist whose images of historic moments of the Cold War include Fidel Castro's 1959 march on Havana and Nikita Khrushchev's visit to the United States that year, died Wednesday, according to Magnum Photos Inc. The cause of death was not immediately given. He began his career with the Magnum Photos agency in 1951 and photographed events in such locations as Japan, Russia and Mexico. A highlight of Mr. Glinn's career came on New Year's Eve 1958, when he was in New York and got word that the dictator Fulgencio Batista had fled Cuba and that a ragtag band of revolutionaries led by Mr. Castro would be making a triumphant march into Havana.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 25, 1990
Nearly four decades after Julius and Ethel Rosenberg were executed for conspiring to pass America's atomic bomb secrets to the Soviet Union, the case that has haunted scholars, historians and partisans of the left and the right has found a new witness: Nikita S. Khrushchev.But the late Soviet leader's testimony -- praise for the Rosenbergs in a newly disclosed memoir that seems to reaffirm the verdict of the court that condemned them in 1953 -- is unlikely to settle a matter that has generated passionate books and an endless debate that swirls with intrigue and mirrors an age of nuclear fear and cold-war doubt.
FEATURES
October 15, 2005
Oct. 15 1964: It was announced that Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev had been removed from office.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times News Service | August 24, 1992
MOSCOW -- There's little doubt it will be one of the world's strangest theme parks, a place for Russians jostled by today's tough times to travel back through the decades to more stable, Communist days.It will be a place where they can hear a radio trumpeting the launch of Sputnik and other victories in the space race with the Americans.It will be a place where, for 22 kopecks, they will be able to swig a bottle of cold beer that today costs 100 times as much. And they will marvel as they meet the first human being in space -- a Russian -- or gasp as their leader reveals the crimes of Soviet dictator Josef Stalin.
FEATURES
October 15, 2005
Oct. 15 1964: It was announced that Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev had been removed from office.
NEWS
December 26, 1990
JUPITER, Fla. (AP) -- Foy David Kohler, a career diplomat and the U.S. ambassador to Moscow during the height of the Cold War, has died at age 82.Mr. Kohler, who was present for the 1959 "kitchen debate" between Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev and then-Vice President Richard Nixon, died Sunday at Jupiter Hospital. The hospital said Mr. Kohler died after a long illness, but it did not release details."His loss is a great loss," said former Secretary of State Dean Rusk. "Foy Kohler was one of our greatest professional diplomats.
NEWS
April 14, 2008
BURT GLINN, 82 Noted photojournalist Burt Glinn, a photojournalist whose images of historic moments of the Cold War include Fidel Castro's 1959 march on Havana and Nikita Khrushchev's visit to the United States that year, died Wednesday, according to Magnum Photos Inc. The cause of death was not immediately given. He began his career with the Magnum Photos agency in 1951 and photographed events in such locations as Japan, Russia and Mexico. A highlight of Mr. Glinn's career came on New Year's Eve 1958, when he was in New York and got word that the dictator Fulgencio Batista had fled Cuba and that a ragtag band of revolutionaries led by Mr. Castro would be making a triumphant march into Havana.
NEWS
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,special to the sun | September 28, 1997
"The Kennedy Tapes: Inside the White House During the Cuban Missile Crisis," edited by Ernest R. May and Philip D. Zelikow. Harvard University Press. 715 pages. $35.On Oct. 16, 1962, President John F. Kennedy saw, for the first time, U-2 aerial reconnaissance photographs showing the Soviets setting up nuclear-armed ballastic missiles in Cuba targeted on American cities. The ensuing crisis brought the world the closest it has ever come to thermonuclear destruction. During the next 13 days, as Kennedy's inner circle debated what to do, the President secretly tape-recorded the discussions.
NEWS
By Henry Trewhitt | November 8, 1992
THE CUBAN MISSILECRISIS, 1962.Edited by Laurence Changand Peter Kornbluh.The New Press.415 pages. $25.THE MISSILES OF OCTOBER.Robert Smith Thompson.Simon & Schuster.395 pages. $25.On Oct. 24, 1962, at 10:25 a.m., Dean Rusk leaned toward McGeorge Bundy and murmured, "We're eyeball to eyeball and I think the other fellow just blinked." The secretary of state's remark to the national security adviser followed a CIA report that Soviet vessels -- possibly carrying nuclear warheads to Cuba -- ,, had stopped before confronting U.S. warships.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | December 17, 2004
Find a sport that requires grace, single-mindedness and robotlike dedication to training and practice, then set a Russian to the task and, most of the time, you'll find a champion. Figure skating, gymnastics, hockey and now tennis. And yet, not even Russian Maria Sharapova, the No. 4 player in the world, who will meet No. 1 Lindsay Davenport tonight in the Mercantile Tennis Challenge at 1st Mariner Arena, saw the Russian tennis advance coming. "No, no, I had no idea," said Sharapova, 17. "Before the French Open, we had top 20, top 50 players.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | June 20, 1999
CRANSTON, R.I. -- Nikita Khrushchev's son lives in a modest suburban ranch house with a Buick and a Pontiac in his garage, a lovingly tended garden in the back yard and a ball field across the street. Radiating in all directions from his driveway are similarly sunny homes on similarly sculpted parcels with sprinkler systems, lawn ornaments and barbecues.Sergei Khrushchev is ensconced here in America, the very place his father predicted would one day fall to communism. That was 40 years ago. Instead, the Soviet empire is no more, and Nikita's only surviving son is studying a booklet about American government in preparation for a trip Wednesday to a federal office building, where he will take a U.S. citizenship test.
NEWS
By David M. Shribman | July 9, 1998
WASHINGTON -- Back from China and back to work in the capital, President Clinton now enters one of the most critical passages of his two tumultuous terms.The investigation by independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr grinds on. The defiance of the Republican Congress grows ever stronger. The midterm elections grow ever closer. His agenda grows ever smaller. His tenure at the center of our national life grows ever briefer.Limited agendaThe president gave a political pep talk the other day, urging Congress to approve the Clinton domestic program before it adjourns for fall campaigning.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | March 2, 1998
LONDON -- On too many occasions, the United Nations has been the big man's whipping boy. President Clinton for one has kicked it harder than his two immediate Republican predecessors ever did. Nikita Khrushchev banged his shoe at it and Charles de Gaulle called it "ce machin." Yet once again we see how in a crisis the big powers run to it to get themselves off the hook, this time for a bombing no one really had the argument or stomach for.Back in 1954, there was the charged incident over the capture of 17 U.S. airmen by China.
NEWS
By Craig Eisendrath and Craig Eisendrath,special to the sun | September 28, 1997
"The Kennedy Tapes: Inside the White House During the Cuban Missile Crisis," edited by Ernest R. May and Philip D. Zelikow. Harvard University Press. 715 pages. $35.On Oct. 16, 1962, President John F. Kennedy saw, for the first time, U-2 aerial reconnaissance photographs showing the Soviets setting up nuclear-armed ballastic missiles in Cuba targeted on American cities. The ensuing crisis brought the world the closest it has ever come to thermonuclear destruction. During the next 13 days, as Kennedy's inner circle debated what to do, the President secretly tape-recorded the discussions.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 4, 1994
WASHINGTON -- If it's true that much success in politics as in life depends on timing, the decision of President Clinton to kick off the new year Saturday with a 10-day, five-country sprint around Europe offers him a choice opportunity to start out strongly in the arena of public opinion.History has shown that nothing boosts an American president's stock more than a high-profile trip abroad, and especially to Europe. This has been particularly true for young presidents, those with modest foreign-policy experience, and even those in deep trouble at home.
NEWS
By Jonathan Schell | July 21, 1993
DURING HIS visit to South Korea last weekend, President Clinton made one of the most explicit threats to annihilate a country any president has made in the nuclear age.Speaking of North Korea, which may be on its way to producing nuclear weapons, Mr. Clinton said, "We would quickly and overwhelmingly retaliate if they were to ever use, to develop and use nuclear weapons. It would mean the end of their country as they know it. They know that is what we are bound to do."Just in case the North Koreans failed to get the message, Mr. Clinton repeated it during his visit to the Demilitarized Zone, observing, "It is pointless for them to try to develop nuclear weapons, because if they ever use them it would be the end of their country."
NEWS
March 24, 1993
* Alexei I. Adzhubei, son-in-law of Soviet leader Nikita S. Khrushchev and former editor of the newspaper Izvestia, died in Moscow at age 68. Mr. Adzhubei, who was married to Mr. Khrushchev's daughter, Rada, lost his prominent editing and Communist Party posts when the bombastic Soviet leader was ousted from power in 1964.* Benjamin Huger Read, 67, an organizer of the Earth Summit conference in Rio de Janeiro and a leading foreign affairs scholar, died Thursday of liver disease in Washington.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 21, 1993
The years fade behind us, but we continue to drape this hour in mourning cloth. So let's be clear about our intent: We mark the various anniversaries of John Kennedy's death not merely as recollections of a martyred president, but as a turning point in our own vanished lives.Thirty years since the shots in Dallas? Yes, but the thing that moves us most deeply is the memory of our own innocence, our own slain hopes. Dallas is where they were buried.Kennedy is mostly our point of reference. The man we thought we knew back then turned out to be somebody else, but we remember how it was in our own hearts when we heard the terrible news, and this is the thing that still stirs us each Nov. 22. Kennedy was a last fling an entire generation had with grand illusions.
NEWS
By Jonathan Schell | July 21, 1993
DURING HIS visit to South Korea last weekend, President Clinton made one of the most explicit threats to annihilate a country any president has made in the nuclear age.Speaking of North Korea, which may be on its way to producing nuclear weapons, Mr. Clinton said, "We would quickly and overwhelmingly retaliate if they were to ever use, to develop and use nuclear weapons. It would mean the end of their country as they know it. They know that is what we are bound to do."Just in case the North Koreans failed to get the message, Mr. Clinton repeated it during his visit to the Demilitarized Zone, observing, "It is pointless for them to try to develop nuclear weapons, because if they ever use them it would be the end of their country."
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