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By The New York Times contributed to this article | November 18, 1991
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia (AP) -- Sophan Nary broke down in tears of rage yesterday when told that the Khmer Rouge leaders who killed her entire family had returned and were staying next door to her noodle shop."
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By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2013
Vaddey Ratner didn't expect much when she first took on the project of writing a novel about a young Cambodian girl and her family who are forced into the countryside by the Khmer Rouge as part of the communist group's program of genocide that began in 1975. It was just something that she needed to do. "I sat down to write as an act of mourning the ghosts and spirits, honoring those lost lives," she explains. "In the Shadow of the Banyan," Ratner's first novel, is based on her experiences as a child.
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NEWS
November 13, 1992
The year-old Cambodia settlement plan is failing because one of the belligerents -- the Khmer Rouge guerrilla army -- never meant it to succeed. After other forces agreed to partial demobilization in cantonments set up by 15,000 United Nations troops, the Khmer Rouge reneged. Its excuse was that all ethnic Vietnamese in the country, where many immigrated for decades, are disguised soldiers who have not been withdrawn by Hanoi.The U.N. would be a better judge. The Khmer Rouge is shooting its fellow Cambodians because it still craves a monopoly of power, still means to purify its people just as it slaughtered a million in the late 1970s and still believes in rule by terror.
NEWS
March 31, 2008
DITH PRAN, 75 `Killing Fields' survivor, news photographer Dith Pran, the Cambodian-born journalist whose harrowing tale of enslavement and eventual escape from that country's murderous Khmer Rouge in 1979 became the subject of the award-winning film The Killing Fields, died of pancreatic cancer yesterday at a New Jersey hospital, according to Sydney Schanberg, his former colleague at The New York Times. Dith's cancer had been diagnosed about three months ago. Dith was working as an interpreter and assistant for Schanberg in Phnom Penh, the Cambodian capital, when the Vietnam War reached its chaotic end in April 1975 and both countries were taken over by communist forces.
NEWS
By Philip Shenon and Philip Shenon,New York Times News Service | November 11, 1991
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- The Khmer Rouge, the communist guerrilla group that once brutally ruled Cambodia and has now joined the new coalition government under a peace accord, is hiding troops and a huge cache of weapons in preparation for the possible resumption of the Cambodian civil war, diplomats and relief workers say.The move, they say, violates disarmament provisions of the United Nations peace treaty that the Khmer Rouge signed in Paris only last...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 22, 1993
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- The Khmer Rouge rebels warned yesterday that internationally supervised elections scheduled to begin tomorrow would "put fuel on the flames of war" in Cambodia and accused the United States of plotting to destroy the Maoist guerrilla group.The rebels, who are threatening to sabotage the United Nations-sponsored elections with violence and who have already been blamed for the deaths of 10 U.N. peacekeepers, said the election results would serve only to give legitimacy to the current Vietnamese-installed government.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 17, 1991
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- In his first speech inside Cambodia in two decades, Prince Norodom Sihanouk told a throng in front of the royal palace yesterday that his former enemies in the Phnom Penh government had done a good job and that his former allies in the hard-line Khmer Rouge should be tried as war criminals.At his first news conference since returning to the country Thursday, a jovial Prince Sihanouk, 69, announced the formation of a political coalition consisting of the ruling Cambodian People's Party in Phnom Penh and the Sihanouk political party, which is headed by his son, Prince Norodom Ranariddh.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | December 14, 1994
SIEM REAP, Cambodia -- Chen Rath was twice cursed: First, a nationwide drought spoiled his autumn rice harvest; then, the Khmer Rouge torched his village as part of their renewed scorched-earth policy.Even so, Chen Rath was lucky. In recent weeks village elders, teachers and government workers have been kidnapped and executed by the Maoist guerrillas. Five foreign tourists were snatched for ransom, then shot dead. Fifty-one village bamboo cutters and 17 loggers were massacred at work last month.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 24, 1993
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- With a threat by Khmer Rouge guerrillas to disrupt the election largely unrealized, Cambodians thronged to the polls yesterday amid initial signs of an unexpectedly heavy and enthusiastic turnout."
NEWS
By Boston Globe | May 20, 1993
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- The campaign to brin democracy to Cambodia two decades after it degenerated into genocide and Communist rule ended yesterday with political rallies, parades and occasional gunfire.On Sunday, about 4.7 million Cambodian voters will begin six days of balloting to choose leaders from among 20 new political parties. The multiparty elections are the first since 1972 and are being held under the eyes of a huge U.N. task force.But there is widespread fear that the nation's fragile new political system -- established at a cost of billions of dollars and involving 22,000 U.N. personnel and 50,000 Cambodians -- might not survive what is supposed to be a cooling-off period between now and Sunday.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | February 4, 2008
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia -- The fears and profound losses still grip Chum Mei even now, three decades after the brutal Khmer Rouge regime terrorized him and millions of other Cambodians. One of only 10 people known to have survived Toul Sleng prison, where 14,000 died, Chum recalls how the Khmer Rouge arrived in this city in April 1975. Intent on abolishing religion and education, private property and money, the Communist militants ordered everyone to march into the countryside. Chum's infant son died for lack of medical attention on the trek.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,sun reporter | April 2, 2007
Laurence J. Bourassa, whose long career as an international aid worker took him to countries across Asia and Africa, died of kidney and respiratory failure Thursday at Long Green Center, a long-term care facility in Baltimore. He was 75. Mr. Bourassa's life was most notably shaped by two episodes, friends and colleagues said - his stint in Somalia with the first group of Peace Corps volunteers, which first gave him a taste for overseas humanitarian work, and two harrowing years he spent in Cambodia during the bloody era of the infamous killing fields.
NEWS
January 25, 2006
At a former military complex outside the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh last week, military authorities handed over a group of new buildings to a United Nations-Cambodian organization. The buildings will serve as a center for investigating and ultimately trying some of the surviving former leaders of the genocidal Khmer Rouge - 27 years after that radical Communist party fell from power. This process of justice, which is finally supposed to begin next month and may take three years, has been in the making for a decade, and there is no certainty that it will proceed as planned.
NEWS
October 14, 2004
THE TOP headline last week from Cambodia was the surprise announcement by King Norodom Sihanouk, its monarch for much of the last six decades, that he plans to abdicate. The mercurial 81-year-old king - often ill and ensconced in a palatial Beijing guesthouse - survived World War II, his country's independence struggle with France, massive covert U.S. bombing, one of history's most horrifying reigns of terror under the radical Maoists known as the Khmer Rouge, invasion by Vietnam, and years of internecine political warfare that still afflicts Cambodia.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | October 31, 2003
WASHINGTON - Since 9/11, we've seen so much depraved violence we don't notice anymore when we hit a new low. Monday's attacks in Baghdad were a new low. Just stop for one second and contemplate what happened: A suicide bomber, driving an ambulance loaded with explosives, crashed into the Red Cross office and blew himself up on the first day of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan. This suicide bomber was not restrained by either the sanctity of the Muslim holy day or the sanctity of the Red Cross.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff | March 23, 2003
The Gate, by Francois Bizot. Knopf. 304 pages, $24. Cambodia -- the country, the war -- once seemed a moral, sanctified cause. A lot of wars begin that way, as endeavors identified with absolutes, but in the end the rectitude only added to the horrific misfortunes of the Cambodians. Francois Bizot, a French scholar of Buddhism and Khmer culture, was living in the Cambodian countryside when, at the end of the 1960s, the United States, North Vietnam and the Cambodian revolutionaries known as the Khmer Rouge each assigned themselves the goal of remaking the country.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | March 20, 1991
There seems to be about a 50-50 chance that the Khmer Rouge will take over Cambodia again within the next year or so -- with help from President Bush and other Americans still fighting the Vietnam War. The last time it was in power it killed between one million and three million of its countrymen.The numbers are inexact because no one could count the skulls and skeletons littering the killing fields. The mass murder began on April 17, 1975, when the Khmer Rouge, crazed communist nationalists determined to return their country to an imagined 12th-century purity, came out of the jungles and took Phnom Penh.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 1, 2002
PHNOM PENH, Cambodia - In what seems to have become a never-ending diplomatic two-step, the United Nations has revived the possibility of putting Cambodia's former Khmer Rouge leaders on trial. In February, it cut off five years of discussions with Cambodia, saying the government had displayed what it called a "lack of urgency" that had raised questions among diplomats here about whether it truly wanted to proceed with a trial. More than two decades after they were driven from power after causing the deaths of more than 1 million people in the late 1970s, it appeared that the surviving Khmer Rouge leaders had gotten off scot-free.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and By Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | December 28, 2000
Twenty-five years ago in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh, the family of Ly Y began its slow journey into the darkness of a four-year midnight. Forced to evacuate the city, his family was shunted along with thousands of others to a distant rural province. Psychologically speaking, his destination was a landscape somewhere between the Dark Ages, the Inquisition and the Reign of Terror. So began the rule of Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge, who from 1975 to 1979 presided over a cultural stripping-down of Cambodia that emptied its cities, schools and businesses while wiping out nearly a quarter of the country's 7.8 million people, through executions, starvation and disease.
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