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NEWS
February 1, 1991
With the allied recapture of Khafji, the Saudi border town briefly occupied by invading Iraqi forces, the first ground skirmish of the Persian Gulf war has run its course. For Americans, the loss of 11 Marines was a reminder that this war, like all wars, has claws. Early euphoria created by the performance of U.S. wonder weapons is gone, along with the Bush administration's suggestions that the conflict could be over in days or weeks. Now the talk is in terms of months.Nonetheless, deep despond would be as unjustified as over-optimism.
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NEWS
By FRANK STARR | February 10, 1991
Washington.SOME OF THE CONTROLS that Desert Storm commanders put on news people seem to have nothing to do with security or with protecting soldiers' lives but a lot to do with how the war looks at home.That seems to collide with the strict distinction military officers are taught to make between their tasks, which are military, and politics, which is civilian.For example: reporters and photographers are barred from Dover Air Force Base where the remains of dead servicemen and women arrive; there have been no photographs of American casualties and almost none of allied casualties; no estimates are given of enemy casualties; a reporter was hustled away from cheering pilots who just learned the war had started; a censor changed the description of returning and successful pilots from "giddy" to "proud."
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NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | February 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Iraqi troops were said to be massing in southern Kuwait last night, amid speculation that a new land assault on allied positions in the northern Saudi desert could be imminent.U.S. Marines said they had been told that five or six Iraqi divisions -- as many as 60,000 troops -- were preparing for a possible attack near the Kuwaiti town of Wafra.U.S. and Saudi officials said last night in the Saudi village of Khafji that four Iraqi mechanized brigades were on the move north of the border, with the possible intention of mounting a major attack.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 5, 1991
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- Iraq's bold ground assaults into Saudi territory last week have raised troubling doubts among U.S. troops over the ability of Saudi defense forces to deal with future threats.While U.S. commanders were quick to praise the performance of Saudi Arabian troops in the battle to recapture the Saudi border town of Khafji, the sentiment does not appear to be shared widely among Marines and soldiers near the front.Some Marines indicated yesterday that they regarded Saudi troops as ready to "haul ass" as soon as the going gets tough.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 1, 1991
Today Khafji, tomorrow the world.The longer this war keeps up, the longer George can get by without a domestic policy.Germany will pay for this war. But not as much as it costs.According to leading economic indicators, there is light beyond the darkness at the end of the tunnel.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | February 1, 1991
OUTSIDE KHAFJI, Saudi Arabia -- In the end, the United States and its allies won the Battle of Khafji -- but not until after 36 hours of helter-skelter confusion that at one point saw the Saudi tanks careening in a chaotic midnight retreat because brother Arab forces were accidentally blasting their position.The Iraqi tanks clearly caught the U.S.-led alliance unprepared. After rumbling into this Saudi hamlet Tuesday night, they managed to keep fighting inside the town for long enough to claim victory in the first ground combat of the war. Then an Iraqi relief column fought in from the north and extracted some Iraqis still holding out inside Khafji.
NEWS
By Patrick Bishop and Patrick Bishop,London Daily Telegraph | January 31, 1991
WITH THE U.S. MARINES OUTSIDE KHAFJI -- The battle for the city started innocently enough.Journalists who reached the city gates on the southern side reported seeing two Iraqi armored vehicles, who were first believed to be advancing in order to give themselves up.At 11:45 a.m., there was a buzz of excitement as the Saudi Arabian National Guard, positioned around the town, reported that a force of up to 80 Iraqi armored vehicles, which was described as...
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 2, 1991
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- As ground clashes between allied and Iraqi forces grow in size and number, U.S. commanders face continued frustrations in trying to determine Iraq's battlefield capabilities and strategies.Their frustration is due in part to Iraq's willingness to portray apparent weakness as strength. Iraq unabashedly claims the propaganda value of a victory even when results in the field add up to a defeat, as appears to be the case with the battle in and around the Saudi border town of Khafji.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 5, 1991
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- Iraq's bold ground assaults into Saudi territory last week have raised troubling doubts among U.S. troops over the ability of Saudi defense forces to deal with future threats.While U.S. commanders were quick to praise the performance of Saudi Arabian troops in the battle to recapture the Saudi border town of Khafji, the sentiment does not appear to be shared widely among Marines and soldiers near the front.Some Marines indicated yesterday that they regarded Saudi troops as ready to "haul ass" as soon as the going gets tough.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun Charles W. Corddry and Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | February 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Allied aircraft dealt heavy damage to Iraqi armored units in the southern Kuwaiti desert yesterday, apparently spoiling a large-scale ground attack on Saudi Arabia, military officials said.The U.S.-led coalition in the Persian Gulf threw "every asset we have that's capable of attacking" against an Iraqi force gathering in the desert area north of the Saudi-Kuwaiti border, said Army Lt. Gen. Thomas Kelly.A senior U.S. official said the Iraqi troops included roughly 7,000 to 10,000 soldiers, as well as tanks and other armored combat vehicles, a far larger force than the ones that struck across the Saudi-Kuwaiti border earlier this week.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 2, 1991
DHAHRAN, Saudi Arabia -- As ground clashes between allied and Iraqi forces grow in size and number, U.S. commanders face continued frustrations in trying to determine Iraq's battlefield capabilities and strategies.Their frustration is due in part to Iraq's willingness to portray apparent weakness as strength. Iraq unabashedly claims the propaganda value of a victory even when results in the field add up to a defeat, as appears to be the case with the battle in and around the Saudi border town of Khafji.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun Charles W. Corddry and Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | February 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Allied aircraft dealt heavy damage to Iraqi armored units in the southern Kuwaiti desert yesterday, apparently spoiling a large-scale ground attack on Saudi Arabia, military officials said.The U.S.-led coalition in the Persian Gulf threw "every asset we have that's capable of attacking" against an Iraqi force gathering in the desert area north of the Saudi-Kuwaiti border, said Army Lt. Gen. Thomas Kelly.A senior U.S. official said the Iraqi troops included roughly 7,000 to 10,000 soldiers, as well as tanks and other armored combat vehicles, a far larger force than the ones that struck across the Saudi-Kuwaiti border earlier this week.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 1, 1991
Today Khafji, tomorrow the world.The longer this war keeps up, the longer George can get by without a domestic policy.Germany will pay for this war. But not as much as it costs.According to leading economic indicators, there is light beyond the darkness at the end of the tunnel.
NEWS
February 1, 1991
With the allied recapture of Khafji, the Saudi border town briefly occupied by invading Iraqi forces, the first ground skirmish of the Persian Gulf war has run its course. For Americans, the loss of 11 Marines was a reminder that this war, like all wars, has claws. Early euphoria created by the performance of U.S. wonder weapons is gone, along with the Bush administration's suggestions that the conflict could be over in days or weeks. Now the talk is in terms of months.Nonetheless, deep despond would be as unjustified as over-optimism.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | February 1, 1991
OUTSIDE KHAFJI, Saudi Arabia -- In the end, the United States and its allies won the Battle of Khafji -- but not until after 36 hours of helter-skelter confusion that at one point saw the Saudi tanks careening in a chaotic midnight retreat because brother Arab forces were accidentally blasting their position.The Iraqi tanks clearly caught the U.S.-led alliance unprepared. After rumbling into this Saudi hamlet Tuesday night, they managed to keep fighting inside the town for long enough to claim victory in the first ground combat of the war. Then an Iraqi relief column fought in from the north and extracted some Iraqis still holding out inside Khafji.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun Karen Hosler of The Sun's Washington Bureau contributed to this article | February 1, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Iraqi troops were said to be massing in southern Kuwait last night, amid speculation that a new land assault on allied positions in the northern Saudi desert could be imminent.U.S. Marines said they had been told that five or six Iraqi divisions -- as many as 60,000 troops -- were preparing for a possible attack near the Kuwaiti town of Wafra.U.S. and Saudi officials said last night in the Saudi village of Khafji that four Iraqi mechanized brigades were on the move north of the border, with the possible intention of mounting a major attack.
NEWS
By FRANK STARR | February 10, 1991
Washington.SOME OF THE CONTROLS that Desert Storm commanders put on news people seem to have nothing to do with security or with protecting soldiers' lives but a lot to do with how the war looks at home.That seems to collide with the strict distinction military officers are taught to make between their tasks, which are military, and politics, which is civilian.For example: reporters and photographers are barred from Dover Air Force Base where the remains of dead servicemen and women arrive; there have been no photographs of American casualties and almost none of allied casualties; no estimates are given of enemy casualties; a reporter was hustled away from cheering pilots who just learned the war had started; a censor changed the description of returning and successful pilots from "giddy" to "proud."
NEWS
May 29, 1991
Lt. Michael H. Green was welcomed home from the Persian Gulf over Memorial Day weekend by his parents, Karl and Sue, sister Laura Trefferand a host of relatives and friends.A member of the 1st Marines Expeditionary Brigade, Green spent eight months in the gulf. His unitreturned to its base in Kaneohe, Hawaii, April 14.The motor transport unit that Green was a part of aided the movement of the 1st Battalion artillery batteries as they fired shells at Iraqi positions in Kuwait during the early days of Operation Desert Storm.
NEWS
By Patrick Bishop and Patrick Bishop,London Daily Telegraph | January 31, 1991
WITH THE U.S. MARINES OUTSIDE KHAFJI -- The battle for the city started innocently enough.Journalists who reached the city gates on the southern side reported seeing two Iraqi armored vehicles, who were first believed to be advancing in order to give themselves up.At 11:45 a.m., there was a buzz of excitement as the Saudi Arabian National Guard, positioned around the town, reported that a force of up to 80 Iraqi armored vehicles, which was described as...
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