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NEWS
May 21, 1992
"We have a lot of beleaguered middle class people just like myself," said Republican senatorial nominee Alan L. Keyes last zTC week at a press conference. But Mr. Keyes' definition of "middle class" is unusually broad: He puts himself in that category despite the $102,000 annualized salary he's taking from campaign contributions and his speaking fee of $3,500 per appearance.Without this $8,500 monthly stipend, Mr. Keyes claims his family would be "turned out in the street" from a four-bedroom home in Montgomery County.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | October 11, 2014
National anthem: Citizen Cope, a Washington-based singer and musician once dubbed "Washington's most soulful export since Marvin Gaye" gives a slowful rendition. Unlike most anthem singles who join fans in Maryland for their "O" moment, Cope waits until they're done to finish. First pitch ceremony: Scott McGregor, whose shutout to clinch the 1983 World Series in five games over the Philadelphia Phillies marked the last time the Orioles won it all, certainly does better than Boog Powell did with similar duties before Game 1 on Friday.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | August 9, 1992
Republican Alan L. Keyes found a symbol for his U.S. Senate campaign last week at a housing project for the elderly in Fells Point across the street from the home of his opponent, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski.Federal housing officials want to close the prayer chapel at Lemko House on South Ann Street. They said they are obliged to preserve the constitutionally mandated separation between church and state. Mr. Keyes had his doubts.Once again, he said, bureaucratic rigidity was robbing people of their rights, destroying confidence in government.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2014
Salisbury's 37-34 overtime upset of then-No. 6 St. John Fisher last Saturday was punctuated by senior fullback J.D. Hook's 16-yard touchdown run. But the running game has been powering the offense all season. The Sea Gulls (2-2 overall and 1-1 in the Empire 8 Athletic Conference) have averaged 289.8 rushing yards thus far, seventh-best in Division III. They compiled 312 rushing yards against a Cardinals defense that had surrendered an average of 288.7 total yards prior to Saturday's contest.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 13, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Alan L. Keyes, a conservative Republican who lost to Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, D-Md., three years ago, will now try to oust the state's other Democratic senator, Barbara A. Mikulski.Mr. Keyes, 41, a former United Nations official who heads TC non-profit group that monitors government spending, has filed his candidacy papers for the 1992 race and has scheduled a campaign kickoff for next Wednesday in Towson.Mr. Keyes said the public's dissatisfaction with Congress can change only through electing "better senators" who will stop the federal "spending spree."
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | October 10, 1992
With his standing in the polls low and slipping, U.S. Senate candidate Alan L. Keyes got more bad news yesterday when a major source of campaign financing decided to use its money in more "winnable" races.In a letter the Keyes campaign released yesterday without comment, the candidate was told by the National Republican Senatorial Campaign Committee that he would get none of the approximately $400,000 he was eligible to be given under Federal Election Commission guidelines.Mr. Keyes faces first-term incumbent Democrat Barbara A. Mikulski.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | October 26, 1992
Jay McMillion likes the Keyes for Senate billboard, the one with the likeness of Alan L. Keyes and the question, "Why not one of us?""I'm not prejudiced," said the 32-year-old tow-truck driver, "but we don't have any blacks at all in the U.S. Senate."That's the kind of response the Keyes campaign had in mind from black Baltimoreans. But for many who stopped to talk with the 42-year-old Republican candidate this weekend, the answer to the billboard's question was not always so agreeable.Many of the people he saw this weekend said they identified with his opponent, Barbara A. Mikulski.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | November 21, 1991
Alan L. Keyes, former diplomat, college president and U.S. Senate candidate, said last night that he is running again for the Senate because Barbara A. Mikulski has lost touch with Maryland and is part of a spendthrift Congress fueling the recession."
FEATURES
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2005
The news that Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes would not run in 2006 ignited wild speculation about who might replace him. Alan L. Keyes: phone home. The perennial candidate has had an enthusiastic, if unsuccessful, career running for office. He's made two bids to represent Maryland in the U.S. Senate and ran twice for the Republican nomination for president. But then, in August, he crossed four states to run for U.S. Senate representing ... Illinois. He rented an apartment in Calumet City, Ill., to establish residency, without giving up his home near Gaithersburg.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Annapolis Bureau John Fairhall contributed to this article | May 6, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- After vehemently defending his right to take a salary of $8,500 a month from campaign contributions, U.S. Senate candidate Alan L. Keyes now says he is reconsidering.Despite what he called "the palpable injustice involved," Mr. Keyes said he might forgo the salary, which has become grist for Maryland talk shows and political critics.But Mr. Keyes said he is in the race to stay, whatever the criticism or cost."I will campaign against [incumbent Democratic Sen.] Barbara Mikulski on foot in the streets and sleep in homeless shelters if I have to, but I will not give up," he said.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
All Orioles manager Buck Showalter had to do was watch the Kansas City Royals' comeback win over the Oakland Athletics in the American League wild-card game last week to see how dangerous his team's AL Championship Series opponent can be on the base paths. The Royals erased a four-run, sixth-inning deficit by running circles around the Athletics, stealing a postseason-record seven bases in the game on their way to a 9-8 win in 12 innings. They've been successful on 12 of 13 stolen-base attempts in the postseason heading into the ALCS.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
Pregame introductions: As the Orioles are introduced before Game 3, former Tigers outfielder Delmon Young does not get a friendly reception. And it's difficult to tell whether Tigers fans are booing Nelson Cruz because it sounds the same as when Orioles fans cheer him. National anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner is performed nicely by local a capella group, Vision Male Vocal Ensemble. Orioles fans make their presence known at the appropriate moment. Pregame ceremony: Former Detroit infielder Placido Polanco throws out the ceremonial first pitch, and the Tigers run a cool video tribute to the great stars of their storied history.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
National anthem: Soprano Chelsea Buyalos provided the second straight operatic anthem of the postseason. Ceremonial first pitch: Orioles vice president of baseball operations Brady Anderson, an American League Division Series hero in his playing career, threw the ceremonial first ball Friday. First pitch: Orioles left-hander Wei-Yin Chen threw a strike to Tigers second baseman Ian Kinsler at 12:08 p.m., one minute after the scheduled start time. It was 66 degrees and cloudy.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | October 3, 2014
The presidential election of 2012 and Maryland's gubernatorial election of 2014 have much in common rhetorically in terms of their approaches to issues and spin, the two key components of political persuasion. The 2012 presidential election pitted a likable African-American Democratic incumbent president against a white, older Republican who had been out of politics for years. The 2014 Maryland gubernatorial race features a likable incumbent African-American Democratic lieutenant governor against a white, older Republican who has been out of politics for years.
HEALTH
By Danae King and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Eight years ago, Dian Corneliussen-James had surgeons cut out half of her right lung, a risky procedure she believes saved her life. Though she thinks the surgery saved her from death from metastatic breast cancer , which had spread to her lung, she said she is "terrified to go off" the drug, Faslodex, that doctors say could be keeping her alive. Her survival has prompted doctors and others to call her and patients with metastatic breast cancer like her "outliers" because they don't know why some patients with the incurable disease live a long time.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Player introductions begin at 5:15: Predictably, biggest ovations for Buck Showalter, Nick Markakis, Adam Jones and Nelson Cruz. First ball ceremony: Interesting first ball ceremony. Manny Machado, who was lost for the season with a knee injury in August, throws ceremonial first pitch to Matt Wieters, who missed five months of the season with an elbow injury. National Anthem: Rolando Sanz delivers terrific rendition. Shockingly, fans shout "O!" at just the right moment.
NEWS
By Sarah Lindenfeld and Sarah Lindenfeld,Contributing Writer | June 1, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Alan L. Keyes, the Baltimore radio talk-show host who is seeking the Republican presidential nomination, owes $44,000 in back debts from his unsuccessful run for a U.S. Senate seat in Maryland in 1992.Mr. Keyes has failed to answer five letters sent to him in the past three years by the Federal Election Commission, which asked him to report on the standing of his campaign debt, according to FEC documents.Under federal law, a congressional candidate must file semiannually with the FEC after a campaign until all debts and obligations are met.By failing to file a report with the FEC, which was revealed in this week's U.S. News and World Report, Mr. Keyes may have violated the Federal Election Campaign Act and could face civil penalties of up to twice the amount he owes.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2000
African-American relics hug the walls and line the shelves of William Snowden Keyes' den - out-of-print books by black authors, worn baseballs signed by Negro League players, Buffalo Soldiers memorabilia. That same sense of history finds its way into drawings, paintings and assemblages created by Keyes, a 79-year-old artist. Each piece is like a postcard from 20th-century black America: a preacher delivering the Sunday sermon, a Mississippi couple traveling north during the 1940s, two sisters playing double-dutch jump rope in the street.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | September 30, 2014
  Catherine Sweeney scored the game's only goal as unranked Catonsville stunned visiting No. 8 Hereford, 1-0, in field hockey Monday. Vanessa Tracy recorded 20 saves for the Comets, whose record improved to 6-1. The Bulls fell to 7-2. No. 7 Century 4, Francis Scott Key 0: Maddie Dickman scored two goals and Mandie Trostle and Shelby Mercer each added one to lift the Knights (6-1-1) over the visiting Eagles from Carroll County. Marissa Donoghue had three assists for Century.
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