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TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
He's a legendary Baltimore Oriole, has starred in Miller Lite beer commercials, and in recent years, has become a barbecue king. Yet to fans in Baltimore and beyond, John Wesley Powell Sr., is simply "Boog" — friendly and down-to-earth, despite all his fame. The Florida native grew up playing baseball in his hometown of Lakeland, Fla.; he was 12 when his local team earned a spot in the Little League World Series. Beginning in the early 1960s, the 6-foot-5 first baseman would go on to play 14 seasons with the Orioles.
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SPORTS
Mike Preston | May 29, 2014
During a 21-minute news conference Thursday, Ravens coach John Harbaugh appeared angry, frustrated and disappointed. As he enters his seventh season, the Ravens have never had more off-field incidents than this offseason. Four of the 13 NFL players who have been arrested or charged with a crime since the Super Bowl on Feb. 2 have been Ravens, according to records kept by ProFootballTalk.com. That's an embarrassment to one of the NFL's top organizations. "There have been a lot more phone calls this year than other years in the offseason to find out what the heck some guys are thinking at times," Harbaugh said.
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BUSINESS
By Marianne Amoss, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
The first indication that KEYW Corp. takes a different approach to business is its name, an adaptation of the airport code for Key West. Then there are the patio furniture in meeting rooms, the parrot mascot and the Jimmy Buffett tune that plays when callers are put on hold. But it's not to be construed as goofing off. “We're not walking around in sandals and shorts,” CEO Len Moodispaw said. “If you were to look at Silicon Valley, which traditionally has been blue jeans and laid-back, we're more like that because of the high-tech workforce we have.” An engineering services firm, KEYW works with software, hardware and systems engineers to develop capabilities and technologies related to cybersecurity, counterterrorism and geospatial intelligence.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | May 2, 2014
College lacrosse Terps men receive three of four ACC individual honors The Terps earned three of four individual Atlantic Coast Conference awards, as senior goalkeeper Niko Amato was selected as the Defensive Player of the Year, attackman Connor Cannizzaro was named Freshman of the Year and John Tillman received the Coach of the Year award. More men: Quinnipiac midfielder Kevin Diehl (Calvert Hall) was selected to the All-Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference rookie team.
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | January 16, 1994
Yachting Race Week at Key West, Fla., the annual season opener for some of the world's most competitive racing sailors, runs today through Friday. Each year the event attracts plenty of Chesapeake Bay competitors along with star-studded crews from around the world.International stars included in this year's group of nearly 2,000 will be Team Dennis Conner tactician Tom Whidden, French America's Cup challenger Marc Pajot, British America's Cup hopeful Harold Cudmore, and Rolex Yachtsmen of the Year and Olympic medalists Jim Brady of Annapolis, Ed Adams and John Kostecki.
FEATURES
By Carol Godwin | December 2, 1990
Positioned at the tip of Florida's strand of keys, Key West fancies itself capital of the Conch Republic (natives of the island call themselves Conches) and mecca of our very own Caribbean islands. As escapes go, it fits the bill with all the swashbuckling history and lure of Indians, pirates, business tycoons, artists, writers and vacationers in search of tropical ambience closer to home.At one time, Key West (population: about 25,000) was the wealthiest city per capita in the United States.
NEWS
By Kathy Lally and Kathy Lally,SUN STAFF | April 28, 2004
KEY WEST, Fla. - He was not such an old man and he fished and he fought and he wrote and he never went many days without drinking at Sloppy Joe's. And the city loved the man for he was a two-fisted tough guy, adventuring and writerly and untamed. And they made Sloppy Joe's bar into a shrine to the man and Sloppy Joe's was Key West and Key West was Sloppy Joe's and the man was Ernest Hemingway. And if the man went to Sloppy Joe's today he would find many Hemingway T-shirts and men drinking until the sun rises and women drinking until the bells toll.
FEATURES
By Nancy Klingener and Nancy Klingener,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 28, 1992
KEY WEST, Fla. -- His face haunts the island, the genial bearded countenance looming over bars and from T-shirts and in the imaginations of visitors who somehow see themselves as part of the legend.The presence of Ernest Hemingway, Nobel Prize-winning novelist, fisherman, hunter, one-time, sometime resident of Key West, defines this tourist boom town like no other individual.His former home -- a stately Spanish-style mansion -- is one of the top attractions in town. Sloppy Joe's on Duval Street, aggressively marketed as "Hemingway's Favorite Bar," packs them in day and night (despite the fact that Sloppy Joe's was in a different building most of the time Hemingway lived here)
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | January 19, 1993
You just have to like a character who says he used to rea Shakespeare in bed while huddled with a flashlight under the covers, hiding the bard between the pages of Playboy so his parents wouldn't learn he was "a closet bookworm."Meet Seamus O'Reilly, the lead character of "Key West," the second half of the premiere of a Tuesday night lineup on the Fox network. (It follows "Class of '96" on WBFF (Channel 45) at 9 p.m.The show does play as an obvious attempt to capture the kooky appeal of CBS' successful "Northern Exposure" and some of the exotic spice of ABC's struggling "Going to Extremes."
SPORTS
By NANCY NOYES | January 24, 1993
When Yachting Race Week at Key West ended Friday after five days of racing in warm weather and sunny skies in virtually perfect breeze, more than one Anne Arundel County-based team of sailors had reason to celebrate.The regatta drew more than 100 boats from J/24s to Virginia Jack King's Annapolis-based Frers 62 Merrythought and from 22 states and six foreign countries. It is the oldest and one of the prestigious on the national circuit of events sponsored by the magazine.In the IMS Class A, in which America's Cup winners Bill Koch an Buddy Melges faced each other and then against defending Key West Race Week champion Geoff Stagg and other top sailors, victory had a distinctly Annapolis flavor.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Just as owner  Steve Bisciotti  had done a day earlier, Ravens coach  John Harbaugh   stood firmly behind  Ray Rice  on Tuesday, saying that the running back “will be part of our team” in 2014. Harbaugh, however, did express disappointment that three of his players - Rice, wide receiver  Deonte Thompson  and offensive guard/tackle  Jah Reid   - were arrested in a 22-day span, calling their actions “unacceptable ... and disappointing.”   “You also separate the person from the activity and redemption is something we think is important as well,” Harbaugh said Tuesday morning at the NFL owners meetings at the  Ritz-Carlton  Orlando Grande Lakes resort.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The Hippodrome Theatre at the France-Merrick Performing Arts Center, a key venue in the blossoming Bromo Tower Arts and Entertainment District, is getting a new president with a history of sparking the redevelopment of an arts community. Ron Legler, president of the Florida Theatrical Association in Orlando and a former chairman of the Downtown Arts District in that city, will succeed Jeff Daniel as Hippodrome president. He is scheduled to start in early May. "I'm very much a community person, as interested in community arts — music, dance, everything — as in Broadway tours," Legler, 46, said.
BUSINESS
By Marianne Amoss, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2013
The first indication that KEYW Corp. takes a different approach to business is its name, an adaptation of the airport code for Key West. Then there are the patio furniture in meeting rooms, the parrot mascot and the Jimmy Buffett tune that plays when callers are put on hold. But it's not to be construed as goofing off. “We're not walking around in sandals and shorts,” CEO Len Moodispaw said. “If you were to look at Silicon Valley, which traditionally has been blue jeans and laid-back, we're more like that because of the high-tech workforce we have.” An engineering services firm, KEYW works with software, hardware and systems engineers to develop capabilities and technologies related to cybersecurity, counterterrorism and geospatial intelligence.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.co | July 15, 2013
Nana Projects, the parade arts studio off West Cold Spring Lane in Evergreen that stages stiltwalking events, puppet shows and an annual parade school that draws people from around the world, is closing its doors at the end of the summer, founder Molly Ross announced Monday.  Ross, who founded Nana Projects in 1993 in Wisconsin, said she is moving to Florida to be with her family. She was best known as organizer of the longtime annual Great Halloween Lantern Parade, in Patterson Park, which was one of the biggest Halloween events in the region.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
For the first time in its 51-year history, the Coast Guard Cutter Chock is under the command of a woman. With tears and cheers and a musical assist from AC/DC, the Curtis Bay station transferred responsibility for the 65-foot tugboat to Chief Petty Officer Tracy Randall from Senior Chief Petty Officer Brian Kuhar. Randall, a 21-year Coast Guard veteran, drew the assignment while stationed in Key West, Fla. It is her first command. "It's over-the-top exciting," said Randall, a Southern California native.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2012
He's a legendary Baltimore Oriole, has starred in Miller Lite beer commercials, and in recent years, has become a barbecue king. Yet to fans in Baltimore and beyond, John Wesley Powell Sr., is simply "Boog" — friendly and down-to-earth, despite all his fame. The Florida native grew up playing baseball in his hometown of Lakeland, Fla.; he was 12 when his local team earned a spot in the Little League World Series. Beginning in the early 1960s, the 6-foot-5 first baseman would go on to play 14 seasons with the Orioles.
TRAVEL
By ALAN SOLOMON and ALAN SOLOMON,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | May 14, 2006
KEY WEST, FLA. / / The greeter at the Blue Heaven restaurant led me through the open courtyard's seating area toward the enclosed dining room. The courtyard was crowded with diners. There was a wait at the bar for tables. There was a buzz. But the dining room was buzzless. Some tables were empty. Was I missing The True Blue Heaven Experience? "Well, maybe," the greeter said. "But some people don't like the 'too much nature' thing -- the chickens and the cats. ..." Chickens and cats?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,Sun Staff | January 28, 2001
Attention day-dreamers: Is winter getting you down already? Are you sick of the snow and cold and ice and weather reports? Do you want a Florida getaway free of charge, free of Super Bowl mania, with no strings attached? Sure you do, campers. Now imagine yourself in the Florida Keys, at a certain bar, a place called the Green Parrot, for example, where, on a recent weekday, a certain pay phone in the bar was called from a certain business address in Baltimore. "The Green Parrot Bar. 'A Sunny Place for Shady People.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2010
Several big investment banks advised Leonard E. Moodispaw that he shouldn't do it — but the CEO of KEYW Corp., a cybersecurity company in Hanover that's been in business for just two years, wouldn't listen. Restless and eager to expand quickly, Moodispaw took KEYW public last month — after canning the Wall Street naysayers who told him to wait for a more hospitable stock market. The company, with the help of smaller investment banks, raised $89 million on the day of its initial public offering.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2010
The Water Street Tavern has a full menu page devoted to crepes. Had I done just a bit of homework, I might not have been surprised (pleasantly) by this unusual offering in an inviting watering hole in downtown Baltimore. Like its neighbor Peter's, it's tucked in an alley that beckons to passersby, especially when the sidewalk tables are full of people. On approach, the tavern's Florida Keys themed outdoor dining area looks like a fine spot to grab a drink after work and exercise your people watching skills.
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