Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKey Highway
IN THE NEWS

Key Highway

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | November 12, 2009
A former industrial parcel on Key Highway in South Baltimore will be the site of a seven-story residential and retail project called Riverside Lofts, if developer Mark Shapiro can get the design and financing approvals he needs to move ahead with construction. Shapiro is scheduled today to present preliminary plans for the project to Baltimore's Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel. They call for a building with a Walgreens store on the first level and 100 to 120 apartments above.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Commuters entering Baltimore from the south on Monday morning found themselves in a massive traffic jam amid widespread confusion about how to navigate a new construction pattern, in part due to a failure by the Maryland Transportation Authority to update signage about the change. "It was way, way, way beyond anything I have seen," said Tamory Winfield, a MdTA spokesman, of the traffic problems on northbound Interstate 95. Crews are rushing to fix the issues before the afternoon rush hour, which will include a northbound influx of fans headed to tonight's Orioles game, he said.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 8, 2012
As of 9 a.m., traffic was slow on I-95 southbound near Key Highway, due to an accident. Accidents were slowing traffic on I-97 northbound near Quarterfield Road in Anne Arundel County, I-95 southbound near Route 100 in Howard County, and I-95 southbound near Route 212 in Howard County. Debris in the road was blocking traffic on I-83 northbound near Shawan Road. Light rail service is suspended between the Timonium and Hunt Valley stations due to construction work. A shuttle bus service is available instead.
NEWS
August 25, 2014
Baltimore beach volleyball is a highly visible contrast to the many negatives often associated with Baltimore ( "How to save Baltimore's beach volleyball," Aug. 6). In fact, an investment banker who is an avid player told me it was the main reason he chose Baltimore to live and work. It is not only a place to play and unwind after a hard day's or week's work, it is an inviting social setting to network with real live, lively people. I actually discovered the Inner Harbor myself when my daughter played and ended up moving to Key Highway.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2011
City traffic engineers are working on the final design for a $7 million traffic circle at the intersection of Key Highway and Light Street. The roundabout — about half the size of the one in Towson — will replace the traffic lights at the gateway intersection that connects South Baltimore and the Inner Harbor near the Maryland Science Center . Construction could begin as soon as July. The intersection has long been a malfunction junction, with befuddled motorists and daredevil pedestrians mixing it up on a road surface scarred by old streetcar tracks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
Here's the part where you tell me how wrong (or how right!) I was on a review. This week's bar review is about The Feisty Goat on Key Highway, which opened in August. From the review: The "Feisty Goat is an agreeable sports bar, adequate for sports fans looking for a no-frills atmosphere to watch a game. But, it could use some improvements in service, atmosphere and variety. " The rest of the review is here . Is it fair? Have you been to the Feisty Goat and pet its namesake, which hangs above the cash register?
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | June 17, 2007
For years, South Baltimore residents have thought a key piece of city property on the Inner Harbor was destined to become yet another high-rise, blocking even more of their shrinking view of the water. But Mayor Sheila Dixon is changing course, saying that the site will become much-needed waterfront parkland. The decision ends a plan announced by city officials more than two years ago to offer developers the city Fire Department's repair facility on Key Highway - a plan that set off alarm bells in a community increasingly separated from the harbor by squat townhouses and condominiums.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 14, 2005
Architect Paul Marks has probably worked on the design of more buildings along Baltimore's Key Highway corridor than anyone else in town. His projects have included the HarborView pier homes, the Ritz Carlton Residences, the Lutheran Center and his own home overlooking the harbor. Based on the sheer volume of work alone, one might call him the King of Key Highway. So it should come as no surprise that the design firm Marks founded in 1967 now has offices along Key Highway as well - in the old "King Syrup" building, no less.
BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | June 24, 2008
A fortress of tony condominiums and townhouses now stands on the grounds of the old Bethlehem Steel shipyard at the base of Federal Hill. The city's Fire Department Repair Facility down the road is slated to be sold for more waterfront residential development. And cargo vessels long ago gave way to the pleasure boats that now dock at the Baltimore Museum of Industry's adjoining sailing school. The Lynch brothers, owners of General Ship Repair Corp., see the writing on the wall. One of the few remaining industrial outfits on Key Highway's Inner Harbor rim, the fourth-generation family business is eyeing a move to Canton after nearly 80 years at its present location.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1996
When Olympic beach volleyball came to Key Highway this year, the NBC cameras panned west toward the Inner Harbor and east toward Fells Point. But they never faced south to capture the highway's grit: old waterfront warehouses, office buildings and torn-up road.To a number of entrepreneurs, developers and museum executives, though, the 83-year-old industrial highway is downright eye-catching. In the 10-block stretch between Covington and Lawrence streets, they see the possibility of a Gold Coast of restaurants, bars and stores.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
The long-term construction on northbound Interstate 95 in Baltimore will once again shift lane patterns this weekend, forcing ramp and exit closures in the process, according to the Maryland Transportation Administration. The current split between Caton Avenue and the Fort McHenry Tunnel of two lanes on the left and two on the right will change to three lanes on the left and one on the right sometime after 9 a.m. Sunday. Traffic in the right lane will be able to exit onto Russell Street, Interstate 395 and Key Highway.
BUSINESS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2014
HarborView Towers, a condominium complex on the Inner Harbor, aims to become an iconic part of the Baltimore skyline now that it has revamped the beacon atop its east tower. "[It's] new and exciting, and I think people are just going to love it," said John Cochran, president of the council of unit owners at HarborView Towers. The new beacon on the building off Key Highway uses energy-efficient light-emitting diodes, or LEDs, which are not only environmentally friendly and cost-efficient, but offer the opportunity for ever-changing displays.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 12, 2014
Two years ago, during bicentennial commemorations for the War of 1812, I was struck by how important the waterfront is to Baltimore. That might seem like an odd thing for a Baltimorean to say, but unless you own waterfront property, work near it or regularly take visitors to see it, you take it for granted. Next thing you know, there's some huge event at the Inner Harbor, and you're awed, along with all the other tourists, by the coolness that is the Baltimore waterfront. The Star-Spangled Sailabration was such a glorious event - with thousands of visitors enjoying fine mid-June weather, tall ships and Blue Angels - that it even impressed Baltimore's numerous cynics.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2014
Ray W. Kauffman, who owned and operated E.J. Codd machine shop in Southeast Baltimore, died of sarcoma complications April 28 at Gilchrist Hospice Center in Towson. The lifelong Roland Park resident was 88. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Ray Menifee Kauffman and the former Alberta Wiegand. Both his parents had hearing impairments due to childhood illnesses. Mr. Kauffman became fluent in sign language and lived in a home with both a door bell, which he could hear, and flashing light, which they could see. Mr. Kauffman, who attended Roland Park Elementary School, remained a resident of a home his family bought about 1906 to escape the city's heat.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2014
Think sunshine - not just sweetness - when you see the Domino Sugars sign lighting up the Inner Harbor at night. Solar panels have been installed on a rooftop at the sugar refinery off Key Highway to illuminate the neon fixture that's long been a landmark of the Baltimore skyline. The photovoltaic array is part of a push by Domino and its corporate parent, Florida-based ASR Group, to make the world's leading producer of cane sugar a little greener. With the $125,000 solar installation and other moves, "we hope to show Baltimore every day that sustainability is top-of-mind here and at our facilities across the globe," said Peter O'Malley, ASR Group's vice president of corporate relations.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
A proposal to build a nine-story, 305-unit apartment complex on Key Highway in front of the Digital Harbor High School prompted questions about parking and building scale at a city meeting Thursday. Alliance Residential Company has the property, located at 1100-1200 Key Highway, under contract for a $75-$90 million project, said Tom Burkert, a Washington-based vice president of development for the company. The roughly 600-foot long site, which measures about 90 feet across, is currently owned by Richard Swirnow of Harborview Limited Partnership.
NEWS
September 27, 1997
WHEN BALTIMORE'S American Visionary Art Museum first opened in November 1995, it was the nation's first permanent exhibit venue devoted exclusively to ''outsider'' art. People have flocked to view works by self-taught artists, making the Visionary Art Museum a popular Inner Harbor destination.The privately operated museum along Key Highway now faces a new challenge. It has won exclusive negotiating rights from the Baltimore Development Corp. to redevelop an abandoned five-story whiskey-barrel warehouse next door.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
For two busy surgeons, the home they have created offers a serene retreat at the end of the day. Troy Pittman's and Michael Somenek's sleek condo at the Ritz-Carlton Residences provides a chance to relax and renew mind, body and spirit. The couple achieved this level of comfort with a simple design style: a clever use of natural and artificial light along with neutral decor and a discriminating use of color. One of their first tasks after moving in was to place every light switch on a dimmer.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.