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By Karin Remesch | December 27, 2001
The laughs are on Kevin Pollak tomorrow through Monday at the grand opening of the Baltimore Improv, a comedy showcase and restaurant at Power Plant Live!, 6 Market Place. Show times are 8:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. tomorrow; 7 p.m., 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. Saturday; 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. Sunday and Monday. The comedian, who's been presenting his shticks on stage since the age of 10, is also a dramatic actor. His many film credits include 3000 Miles to Graceland, Grumpy Old Men and Grumpier Old Men, A Few Good Men and The Usual Suspects.
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By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 9, 2004
The Whole Nine Yards shouldn't have worked. The plot was contrived, the direction uneven. But thanks to the cast, that 2000 action-comedy came out OK. Bruce Willis, Matthew Perry, Amanda Peet and Natasha Henstridge all have a gift for flakiness, and that was just enough to produce a fairly regular supply of giggles. It was as if they, and some of the others in the cast, were in a conspiracy to ignore or make fun of what was dull or stupid about the film. And much of the time they made you feel like you were in on the joke.
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By Steve McKerrow | December 21, 1991
Comedian Kevin Pollak makes a joke of his relative obscurity near the opening of a new edition of the "HBO Comedy Hour" tonight, but Baltimore viewers actually may recognize him right away.The funny comic played crazy cousin Izzy in "Avalon," filmmaker Barry Levinson's evocative 1990 ode to his own growing up years in Charm City. In fact, the film credit is mentioned briefly in "Kevin Pollak: Stop With the Kicking," premiering at 10:15 p.m. on the premium service.Like most of the "HBO Comedy Hour" installments, this one is a mix of Pollak's stand-up act (as taped at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts near San Francisco)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | December 27, 2001
The laughs are on Kevin Pollak tomorrow through Monday at the grand opening of the Baltimore Improv, a comedy showcase and restaurant at Power Plant Live!, 6 Market Place. Show times are 8:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. tomorrow; 7 p.m., 9 p.m. and 11 p.m. Saturday; 7:30 p.m. and 10 p.m. Sunday and Monday. The comedian, who's been presenting his shticks on stage since the age of 10, is also a dramatic actor. His many film credits include 3000 Miles to Graceland, Grumpy Old Men and Grumpier Old Men, A Few Good Men and The Usual Suspects.
FEATURES
By Jay Boyar and Jay Boyar,ORLANDO SENTINEL | April 9, 2004
The Whole Nine Yards shouldn't have worked. The plot was contrived, the direction uneven. But thanks to the cast, that 2000 action-comedy came out OK. Bruce Willis, Matthew Perry, Amanda Peet and Natasha Henstridge all have a gift for flakiness, and that was just enough to produce a fairly regular supply of giggles. It was as if they, and some of the others in the cast, were in a conspiracy to ignore or make fun of what was dull or stupid about the film. And much of the time they made you feel like you were in on the joke.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 29, 1999
Not since Sam Donaldson and Diane Sawyer were forced to share an anchor desk for the debut of "PrimeTime Live" have I seen chemistry as awful as that of Nancy Travis and Kevin Pollak in the new CBS sitcom "Work With Me."I kept wondering who would be crazy enough to stick with the casting after they saw the two actors on screen together, and then I found out the co-executive producers were Travis, Pollak, and Pollak's wife, Lucy Webb. Why do I think a more impartial group of producers might have seen things more clearly?
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 24, 1999
While "Toy Story 2" and "Princess Mononoke" show audiences that animated features can be just as fluid and expressive as their live-action counterparts, there are live-action movies that seem determined to be as two-dimensional as possible.Enter "End of Days," as idiotic, ugly and ridiculous a case in point as can be imagined.Arnold Schwarzenegger (just what computer animation program created him?) plays a burned-out security guard who foils a plot by Satan (Gabriel Byrne, changing accents more often than Kathleen Turner)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 14, 2000
A post-Trump, post-Buchanan political culture is the setting for "Deterrence," a political thriller set in 2008 in which an American president is bedeviled by some age-old conundrums. Morality, international security and political expedience all come into play in this movie, and it's as heavily loaded with metaphors as it is with plot points. (A shot of a chess board during a discussion of military strategy is just one example.) As heavy-handed as he often is, first-time filmmaker Rod Lurie still manages to create the type of claustrophobic atmosphere that acts like a hothouse for high stakes and human emotion.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 22, 2001
People have two reactions to the wild: It is either full of fresh air and renewal or gross inconveniences and terrors. The hilarious idea at the center of "Dr. Dolittle 2" is that Eddie Murphy's dapper animal-talking San Francisco doctor is the one pushing the former view on a show-biz sort named Archie: a performing bear. Catch phrases aside, this bear doesn't do anything in the woods. But Archie must learn to fight, forage and mate if the preserves north of the city are going to survive.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 17, 1998
It isn't every made-for-TV movie that rates an introduction by the president of the United States. But that's what "The Wonderful World of Disney's" "Ruby Bridges" gets tomorrow night on ABC.The Disney film about the 6-year-old African-American girl who helped integrate New Orleans' schools in 1960 is introduced by President Clinton and Michael Eisner, CEO of the Walt Disney Co., from the Cabinet Room of the White House.Eisner explains the 1954 Supreme Court ruling in Brown vs. Board of Education on school desegregation, while the president recalls going to all-white schools in Arkansas.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 22, 2001
People have two reactions to the wild: It is either full of fresh air and renewal or gross inconveniences and terrors. The hilarious idea at the center of "Dr. Dolittle 2" is that Eddie Murphy's dapper animal-talking San Francisco doctor is the one pushing the former view on a show-biz sort named Archie: a performing bear. Catch phrases aside, this bear doesn't do anything in the woods. But Archie must learn to fight, forage and mate if the preserves north of the city are going to survive.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | April 14, 2000
A post-Trump, post-Buchanan political culture is the setting for "Deterrence," a political thriller set in 2008 in which an American president is bedeviled by some age-old conundrums. Morality, international security and political expedience all come into play in this movie, and it's as heavily loaded with metaphors as it is with plot points. (A shot of a chess board during a discussion of military strategy is just one example.) As heavy-handed as he often is, first-time filmmaker Rod Lurie still manages to create the type of claustrophobic atmosphere that acts like a hothouse for high stakes and human emotion.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 24, 1999
While "Toy Story 2" and "Princess Mononoke" show audiences that animated features can be just as fluid and expressive as their live-action counterparts, there are live-action movies that seem determined to be as two-dimensional as possible.Enter "End of Days," as idiotic, ugly and ridiculous a case in point as can be imagined.Arnold Schwarzenegger (just what computer animation program created him?) plays a burned-out security guard who foils a plot by Satan (Gabriel Byrne, changing accents more often than Kathleen Turner)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 29, 1999
Not since Sam Donaldson and Diane Sawyer were forced to share an anchor desk for the debut of "PrimeTime Live" have I seen chemistry as awful as that of Nancy Travis and Kevin Pollak in the new CBS sitcom "Work With Me."I kept wondering who would be crazy enough to stick with the casting after they saw the two actors on screen together, and then I found out the co-executive producers were Travis, Pollak, and Pollak's wife, Lucy Webb. Why do I think a more impartial group of producers might have seen things more clearly?
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | January 17, 1998
It isn't every made-for-TV movie that rates an introduction by the president of the United States. But that's what "The Wonderful World of Disney's" "Ruby Bridges" gets tomorrow night on ABC.The Disney film about the 6-year-old African-American girl who helped integrate New Orleans' schools in 1960 is introduced by President Clinton and Michael Eisner, CEO of the Walt Disney Co., from the Cabinet Room of the White House.Eisner explains the 1954 Supreme Court ruling in Brown vs. Board of Education on school desegregation, while the president recalls going to all-white schools in Arkansas.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 21, 1991
Comedian Kevin Pollak makes a joke of his relative obscurity near the opening of a new edition of the "HBO Comedy Hour" tonight, but Baltimore viewers actually may recognize him right away.The funny comic played crazy cousin Izzy in "Avalon," filmmaker Barry Levinson's evocative 1990 ode to his own growing up years in Charm City. In fact, the film credit is mentioned briefly in "Kevin Pollak: Stop With the Kicking," premiering at 10:15 p.m. on the premium service.Like most of the "HBO Comedy Hour" installments, this one is a mix of Pollak's stand-up act (as taped at the Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts near San Francisco)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 14, 1996
"House Arrest" couldn't get itself arrested if it tried.A somewhat clotted comedy, it never manages to decide what kind of movie it wants to be or what it wants to say; it just spins its wheels fecklessly for the longest time until, finally, helpfully, it ends.It plays, somewhat trivially, on America's warped tradition of dysfunctional, disintegrating family life, but at the same time mates this topic with a heavy-handed fantasy of child empowerment, all while squandering a terrific cast.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 24, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- CBS has a delicious bit of recycling in store for viewers starting tonight, as well as a new show that even its producer, Rob Reiner, calls "an acquired taste."If you are a fan of Leslie Nielsen and "Naked Gun," don't miss the return of "Police Squad!" at 8 tonight (and subsequent Wednesdays) on WBAL-TV (Channel 11)."Police Squad!" is the 1982 ABC-TV spoof of cop shows that inspired the phenomenally successful "Naked Gun" movies.The TV series was canceled after only six episodes.
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