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By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
Long before he became a Grammy-winning songwriter and hip-hop music mogul, before he reached millionaire status and before he began to hobnob with the likes of Oprah, Nelson Mandela and Barack Obama, Kevin Liles was a kid growing up in a West Baltimore rowhouse. "My parents were teenagers. My [biological] father left when I was 2," said Liles, 45, who lived in his grandparent's rowhouse on Presstman Street before the family moved to Baltimore County. "But no matter where you are in life, God can give you the foundation for something greater.
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By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
NEW YORK CITY - Kevin Liles is riding high. On a bright August afternoon, the Baltimore-born entertainment mogul is ensconced 35 stories above midtown Manhattan, enjoying lunch at one of the city's most exclusive hotels, the Mandarin Oriental. The restaurant is a favorite spot for the music impresario, who is dining with his mother and two of his three children. "There's so much I want to do," says the 46-year-old entrepreneur and former Warner Music Group executive.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Kevin Liles, a West Baltimore native who became the president of Def Jam records, is slated to receive a national award Wednesday evening for his philanthropic work. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings is to present the Congressional Award Foundation's Horizon Award to Liles at a ceremony at Washington's Hyatt Regency, according to Cummings' office. The entertainment mogul's local foundation, Kevin Liles for a Better Baltimore, hosts an annual back-to-school fair. He also sponsors summer sessions on college campuses for disadvantaged teenagers through his Make It Happen Foundation.
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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Kevin Liles, a West Baltimore native who became the president of Def Jam records, is slated to receive a national award Wednesday evening for his philanthropic work. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings is to present the Congressional Award Foundation's Horizon Award to Liles at a ceremony at Washington's Hyatt Regency, according to Cummings' office. The entertainment mogul's local foundation, Kevin Liles for a Better Baltimore, hosts an annual back-to-school fair. He also sponsors summer sessions on college campuses for disadvantaged teenagers through his Make It Happen Foundation.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
NEW YORK CITY - Kevin Liles is riding high. On a bright August afternoon, the Baltimore-born entertainment mogul is ensconced 35 stories above midtown Manhattan, enjoying lunch at one of the city's most exclusive hotels, the Mandarin Oriental. The restaurant is a favorite spot for the music impresario, who is dining with his mother and two of his three children. "There's so much I want to do," says the 46-year-old entrepreneur and former Warner Music Group executive.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
His ears are among the most important in the music industry. Often, they'll determine which, if any, of the 40 new CDs he receives each day you might one day listen to. But sometimes even Kevin Liles' ears need help. So the Warner Music Group executive resorts to a tactic he learned two decades ago as a performer on the Baltimore music circuit: He opens the doors to his New York office, plants his stereo speakers facing outward and pumps up the volume until it pulsates loud enough to unhinge the doors.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | September 2, 2007
Neighbors danced in the street yesterday as the 2900 block of Presstman St. in Baltimore was renamed after a fellow west-sider who rose to become one of the most powerful executives in the music industry. Kevin Liles, executive vice president of Warner Music Group and former president of Def Jam Records, stood beside Mayor Sheila Dixon on a platform as a street sign was unveiled reading "Kevin Liles Drive." In an impassioned speech, Liles urged residents of his struggling neighborhood to take responsibility for themselves and their community, and not wait for the government to solve their problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to the Sun | January 6, 2002
Kevin Liles may head the world's most successful rap label, may inhabit a universe punctuated by the thumping beat, rhythm and rhyme of hip-hop. But his personality suggests another type of music, harks back to an era when silky smooth sounds poured like honey from gleaming instruments, when cats like Miles Davis and Charlie Parker ruled. Jazz, man. Jazz musicians are innovators, possessing not only raw talent, but also the all-important ability to ad lib, improvise. Liles knows all about improvisation: It's juggling college courses, a full-time job and assorted disc jockey gigs at night.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | December 27, 1991
MILLI Vanilli, the dreadlocked duo who lip-synced their way to stardom, is doing Carefree gum commercials that poke fun at their fraud.Kevin Liles is laughing, but not all the way to the bank.He's one of the five people who are credited with the hit song, "Girl You Know It's True," which propelled Milli Vanilli -- Rob Pilatus and Fab Morvan -- to a Grammy Award and international fame. Meanwhile Liles and his band, the Numarks, lingered in anonymity."We started everything," said Liles. "Without 'Girl You Know It's True,' there wouldn't have been a Milli Vanilli or anything."
NEWS
October 30, 2005
NATIONAL Iraq toll skewed by class A survey of troops killed in Iraq shows that the dead are frequently white, working-class young men, largely from the South or small towns, Pentagon records show. pg 1a WORLD U.S., Japan reshape alliance The United States and Japan reached a sweeping defense agreement yesterday, which calls for the removal of thousands of U.S. troops from Okinawa and a larger Japanese commitment of its own defenses. pg 17a Bombs kill 50 in India Near simultaneous blasts in New Delhi, India, killed at least 50 people yesterday on the eve of a national Hindu holiday.
FEATURES
By Donna M. Owens, For The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2013
Long before he became a Grammy-winning songwriter and hip-hop music mogul, before he reached millionaire status and before he began to hobnob with the likes of Oprah, Nelson Mandela and Barack Obama, Kevin Liles was a kid growing up in a West Baltimore rowhouse. "My parents were teenagers. My [biological] father left when I was 2," said Liles, 45, who lived in his grandparent's rowhouse on Presstman Street before the family moved to Baltimore County. "But no matter where you are in life, God can give you the foundation for something greater.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,Sun reporter | September 2, 2007
Neighbors danced in the street yesterday as the 2900 block of Presstman St. in Baltimore was renamed after a fellow west-sider who rose to become one of the most powerful executives in the music industry. Kevin Liles, executive vice president of Warner Music Group and former president of Def Jam Records, stood beside Mayor Sheila Dixon on a platform as a street sign was unveiled reading "Kevin Liles Drive." In an impassioned speech, Liles urged residents of his struggling neighborhood to take responsibility for themselves and their community, and not wait for the government to solve their problems.
NEWS
November 18, 2005
NATIONAL Ex-official in Iraq charged A former U.S. contract supervisor in Iraq has become the first current or former American official to face criminal charges in connection with the multibillion-dollar reconstruction of the country, federal authorities said yesterday. Robert J. Stein, 50, a former Coalition Provisional Authority official in Hillah, Iraq, was arrested in Fayetteville, N.C., in connection with an alleged fraudulent scheme to award construction contracts worth more than $18 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JOE BURRIS and JOE BURRIS,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
His ears are among the most important in the music industry. Often, they'll determine which, if any, of the 40 new CDs he receives each day you might one day listen to. But sometimes even Kevin Liles' ears need help. So the Warner Music Group executive resorts to a tactic he learned two decades ago as a performer on the Baltimore music circuit: He opens the doors to his New York office, plants his stereo speakers facing outward and pumps up the volume until it pulsates loud enough to unhinge the doors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,Special to the Sun | January 6, 2002
Kevin Liles may head the world's most successful rap label, may inhabit a universe punctuated by the thumping beat, rhythm and rhyme of hip-hop. But his personality suggests another type of music, harks back to an era when silky smooth sounds poured like honey from gleaming instruments, when cats like Miles Davis and Charlie Parker ruled. Jazz, man. Jazz musicians are innovators, possessing not only raw talent, but also the all-important ability to ad lib, improvise. Liles knows all about improvisation: It's juggling college courses, a full-time job and assorted disc jockey gigs at night.
FEATURES
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Evening Sun Staff | December 27, 1991
MILLI Vanilli, the dreadlocked duo who lip-synced their way to stardom, is doing Carefree gum commercials that poke fun at their fraud.Kevin Liles is laughing, but not all the way to the bank.He's one of the five people who are credited with the hit song, "Girl You Know It's True," which propelled Milli Vanilli -- Rob Pilatus and Fab Morvan -- to a Grammy Award and international fame. Meanwhile Liles and his band, the Numarks, lingered in anonymity."We started everything," said Liles. "Without 'Girl You Know It's True,' there wouldn't have been a Milli Vanilli or anything."
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2012
Baltimore County and the Kevin Liles for a Better Baltimore Foundation will host a back-to-school festival Saturday in Woodlawn. The event is scheduled for noon to 4 p.m. at Security Square Mall. It will focus on families with low to moderate incomes. Features will include educational games, entertainment, free haircuts and school supplies, and information on college and career options. The county's health department will provide free immunizations for children who qualify for the Vaccines for Children program.
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