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By Michael Hill | November 2, 1990
There's an appealing, refreshing quality to a new production of "Hamlet" available on PBS tonight that might be attributable to its all-American status.By keeping everything on this side of the Atlantic, the play was one small but important step removed from the near-deification that Shakespeare and his works have undergone in England.And that means that handing the title role to an actor like Kevin Kline helps to make "Hamlet" what Shakespeare intended it to be, a play to be enjoyed instead of a theatrical icon to be worshiped.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 9, 2006
A Prairie Home Companion is a down-home-exquisite musical dramedy. It fills you with a joyful noise even when the subject is mortality. Working from a script by Garrison Keillor, with some of the personalities and/or characters from Keillor's radio show of the same name, the director, Robert Altman, achieves a homespun-gossamer texture. That's a miracle for a movie about a buttoned-up Minnesotan, Keillor, known here as "GK," hosting an old-fashioned live variety program with a cast of radio performers whose messy lives intersect uproariously and unexpectedly with their on-air personae.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,FILM CRITIC | May 7, 1993
Issue No. 1: Could two guys from Baltimore do a better job fixing the economy than all the politicians in Washington? On a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 representing never and 10 representing ontological certainty, what's the answer?The answer, in "Dave," is 10: that is, with ontological certainty, yes. And the wider point -- not to put too much of a homer's spin on it -- is both geographical and moral: It contrasts the wordly corruption of Washington with the down-home decency of Baltimore. It says -- oh, wondrous movie -- the following: Baltimore is better than Washington.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2006
Steve Martin ties himself into a Gordian knot trying to play Inspector Clouseau in Shawn Levy's The Pink Panther. He's the latest gifted comic actor to pale to near-invisibility before the memory of Peter Sellers, who created the French detective whose only genius is for idiocy. Hardly anyone noticed that the great Alan Arkin played the title role of Bud Yorkin's Inspector Clouseau (1968). And in 1983, when the director of all Sellers' Clouseau movies, Blake Edwards, introduced a promising light comedian named Ted Wass as Clouseau's American successor, the title proved all too prescient - The Curse of the Pink Panther.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 2, 2001
Life as a House mounts a brutally insensitive attack on its audience's sensitivities. Like As Good as it Gets, which the screenwriter, Mark Andrus, also had a hand in, this film may win applause for being "uplifting" and "true to life" because it balances emotional graft with goofiness and willful eccentricity. Kevin Kline, playing an architect with terminal cancer, isn't the coarse crowd-pleaser Jack Nicholson was as a misanthropic writer. But audiences respond to Kline's conviction to carry the story, even if they wisely reject the story itself, which is about a man redeeming himself and rescuing his family while facing down death.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2004
"There are lots of great juicy stories of nefarious, prodigious sexual encounters. He never was apologetic. He may have been tormented by it. Certainly, he wrote a lot of songs, 'What Is This Thing Called Love?' I think he was constantly investigating, exploring what love was."-- Kevin Kline, who plays Cole Porter in the new film De-Lovely.
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By Los Angeles Times | December 6, 1990
Films going into production:''The Dark Half'' (Dark Half Productions). Shooting in Pittsburgh. Horror maven George Romero is executive producer, screenwriter and director of this chiller starring Tim Hutton, Amy Madigan, Michael Rooker and Julie Harris. Hutton plays an author whose life, along with his murderous subjects, is shown in detail.''Soapdish'' (Paramount). Shooting in New York. Sally Field, Kevin Kline, Whoopi Goldberg, Robert Downey Jr. and Elisabeth Shue all star in this look at a soap star (Field)
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2006
Steve Martin ties himself into a Gordian knot trying to play Inspector Clouseau in Shawn Levy's The Pink Panther. He's the latest gifted comic actor to pale to near-invisibility before the memory of Peter Sellers, who created the French detective whose only genius is for idiocy. Hardly anyone noticed that the great Alan Arkin played the title role of Bud Yorkin's Inspector Clouseau (1968). And in 1983, when the director of all Sellers' Clouseau movies, Blake Edwards, introduced a promising light comedian named Ted Wass as Clouseau's American successor, the title proved all too prescient - The Curse of the Pink Panther.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 9, 2006
A Prairie Home Companion is a down-home-exquisite musical dramedy. It fills you with a joyful noise even when the subject is mortality. Working from a script by Garrison Keillor, with some of the personalities and/or characters from Keillor's radio show of the same name, the director, Robert Altman, achieves a homespun-gossamer texture. That's a miracle for a movie about a buttoned-up Minnesotan, Keillor, known here as "GK," hosting an old-fashioned live variety program with a cast of radio performers whose messy lives intersect uproariously and unexpectedly with their on-air personae.
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
He's Mr. Chips. He's George Bailey. He's Mr. Holland. But is he gay?All you need to know is that he's Kevin Kline, in all his impish, charismatic glory: Kevin Kline in "Dave" mode, with a little of the sputter of "A Fish Called Wanda." As Howard Brackett, a literature teacher in a tiny Indiana town who is "outed" during a former student's Oscar speech, he conveys a winsome likability, frustration and vulnerability without ever being maudlin. He is wonderfully funny.Of course, Howard is outed the week of his wedding, and therein lies the comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 8, 2004
"There are lots of great juicy stories of nefarious, prodigious sexual encounters. He never was apologetic. He may have been tormented by it. Certainly, he wrote a lot of songs, 'What Is This Thing Called Love?' I think he was constantly investigating, exploring what love was."-- Kevin Kline, who plays Cole Porter in the new film De-Lovely.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Terry Lawson and Terry Lawson,KNIGHT RIDDER / TRIBUNE | April 15, 2004
I cannot say with any conviction that Steve Martin is the ideal choice to play one of the great comic creations of the 20th century, the bumbling French Inspector Clouseau, in the long-gestating revival of the Pink Panther franchise. As gifted as Martin may be, he is the John Wayne of comedy, always Steve Martin in whatever role he plays - even Silas Marner. My personal choice was Kevin Kline (a look at A Fish Called Wanda should make the case), and I would have also been hopeful about Kevin Spacey, who apparently gave it semi-serious consideration.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 2, 2001
Life as a House mounts a brutally insensitive attack on its audience's sensitivities. Like As Good as it Gets, which the screenwriter, Mark Andrus, also had a hand in, this film may win applause for being "uplifting" and "true to life" because it balances emotional graft with goofiness and willful eccentricity. Kevin Kline, playing an architect with terminal cancer, isn't the coarse crowd-pleaser Jack Nicholson was as a misanthropic writer. But audiences respond to Kline's conviction to carry the story, even if they wisely reject the story itself, which is about a man redeeming himself and rescuing his family while facing down death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SLOANE BROWN and SLOANE BROWN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 21, 2001
Local folks seem to be heeding the president's advice not to give in to fear: Loads of 'em turned out to social events last weekend. That's not to say the events of Sept. 11 were forgotten. Word of mouth about last year's first annual "Bull & Oyster Roast" for HERO -- Health Education Resource Organization -- brought out an even bigger crowd this year. Some 245 folks showed up at The Overlea on Belair Road to gorge on good eats, dance and play wheel games. HERO's Beezer Zepp says the shindig brought together all sorts of people, raising more than $13,000 for HIV / AIDS support and services.
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 14, 1999
Bottom's up in the newest screen version of "A Midsummer Night's Dream," William Shakespeare's play that has been brought to the screen three times (four if you count Woody Allen).Bottom, in this case, is Nick Bottom, a relatively minor character in the play whose transformation into an ass would otherwise be played strictly for laughs. But here, Bottom is portrayed by the superlative Kevin Kline in a wistful, highly sympathetic turn that imbues Shakespeare's most enchanting play with a surprising touch of pathos.
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
He's Mr. Chips. He's George Bailey. He's Mr. Holland. But is he gay?All you need to know is that he's Kevin Kline, in all his impish, charismatic glory: Kevin Kline in "Dave" mode, with a little of the sputter of "A Fish Called Wanda." As Howard Brackett, a literature teacher in a tiny Indiana town who is "outed" during a former student's Oscar speech, he conveys a winsome likability, frustration and vulnerability without ever being maudlin. He is wonderfully funny.Of course, Howard is outed the week of his wedding, and therein lies the comedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | May 5, 1995
Meg Ryan seems to play the same role in almost all her movies, the girl-next-door who finds unexpected love, but her fans don't seem to mind if the chemistry works. And it works, really works, in the charming romantic comedy "French Kiss."Breezier than "When Harry Met Sally . . . " and a lot sassier than the saccharine "Sleepless in Seattle," prime examples of the Meg Ryan subgenre, "French Kiss" sustains a light touch and still manages to be touching.Aglow with energy, Ryan gives her character both innocence and brains.
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By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer | August 4, 1992
Still angry at Time Warner Inc. for distributing Ice-T's controversial song "Cop Killer," Donald Helms wanted to turn back the tide last night, to stop the throngs entering Oriole Park at Camden Yards.Inside, a movie crew was shooting scenes for a Warner Bros. film called "Dave," which stars Kevin Kline and Sigourney Weaver. Mr. Helms, president of Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 3, urged baseball fans to stay away to show their continuing displeasure with "Cop Killer" and the parent company.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | January 24, 1997
God may love all creatures great and small but he especially likes them tall -- and balding, and filled with the rigid, rumpled, fearful look of an ex-police inspector in over his head. And with mustaches. And with the name John Cleese.Carry on, Cleese!Cleese is back, eight years after "A Fish Called Wanda" with "Fierce Creatures," boasting the same cast (Jamie Lee Curtis, Michael Palin and a double dosage of Kevin Kline) arrayed in roughly the same personality range as before, but utterly unconnected to the earlier shenanigans and reimagined in a completely foolish plot.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 19, 1996
Haven't checked out the Muppets' latest incarnation yet? Unfortunately, you're going to have to wait a while. ABC announced yesterday that it was pulling the episode scheduled for tonight because it included a sketch satirizing the movie "Speed," in which a mad bomber was threatening to blow up the studio if the show's ratings fell below a 50. Showing that episode on the anniversary of the Oklahoma City bombing might not have been the best idea, so the...
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