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Kevin Kallaugher

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TOPIC
December 5, 1999
Like his colleague, Mike Lane, Kevin Kallaugher won his job as a Baltimore Sun cartoonist by sending in a portfolio in 1988 that immediately caught an editor's eye.He was already on his way to an international reputation by reason of his work as chief illustrator for the Economist magazine of London. But he wanted a voice in the politics and mores of his native America and decided to embark on an unusual trans-Atlantic career: Daily cartooning in Baltimore, weekly illustrations (including covers)
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NEWS
April 16, 2014
Kevin Kallaugher's recent political cartoon showed a mongrel dog labeled TEA PARTY attacking the coattails of President Barack Obama ("Dogged opposition," April 13). Johnson is commiserating with the president on the struggles he encountered 50 years ago as he tried to pass civil rights legislation, remarking on "the dogged ignorance that was on display" at the time. But where is the bigoted mongrel gnawing on LBJ's boots and sporting a tag that reads SOUTHERN DEMOCRATS? Did KAL forget that it was the Southern Democrats, led by Sen. Richard Russell of Georgia, who filibustered for 54 days to block passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | August 20, 2000
"KAL Draws the Line: Political Cartoons by Kevin Kallaugher" (SunSource, 167 pages, $16.95) Kevin Kallagher is an esteemed colleague and a warm friend, about whose work I cannot fairly be charged with being objective. Still, as a lifetime superfan of cartoons as well as cartoonists, no one drawing on daily newspaper editorial pages these days brings me more delight than KAL. This, the fourth collection of his work, runs from 1998 to date, and is comfortably arranged by categories - allowing the squeamish to be spared, for example, "Oval Office Affairs" by jumping to "Local Affairs."
NEWS
April 18, 2013
To say that I was absolutely outraged when I saw the KAL's cartoon of April 14 is putting it more than mildly. To see Dr. Ben Carson falling flat on his face is showing such disrespect for a man who has spent half of his life using his surgical skills to heal and save the lives of so many children in this country. It is disgraceful to say the least. Apparently, this disrespect for the doctor is because he had the audacity to speak from the heart of his Christian values with regard to marriage.
NEWS
April 16, 2014
Kevin Kallaugher's recent political cartoon showed a mongrel dog labeled TEA PARTY attacking the coattails of President Barack Obama ("Dogged opposition," April 13). Johnson is commiserating with the president on the struggles he encountered 50 years ago as he tried to pass civil rights legislation, remarking on "the dogged ignorance that was on display" at the time. But where is the bigoted mongrel gnawing on LBJ's boots and sporting a tag that reads SOUTHERN DEMOCRATS? Did KAL forget that it was the Southern Democrats, led by Sen. Richard Russell of Georgia, who filibustered for 54 days to block passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act?
NEWS
April 18, 2013
To say that I was absolutely outraged when I saw the KAL's cartoon of April 14 is putting it more than mildly. To see Dr. Ben Carson falling flat on his face is showing such disrespect for a man who has spent half of his life using his surgical skills to heal and save the lives of so many children in this country. It is disgraceful to say the least. Apparently, this disrespect for the doctor is because he had the audacity to speak from the heart of his Christian values with regard to marriage.
NEWS
By James H. Bready | August 30, 1992
A 1993 calendar arrived in the mail last week; too soon! But the Christmas-book season starts any day now. Some of the following titles won't be in bookstores until well into autumn, but you should look forward to, nay save up for, a promising assortment."
FEATURES
January 17, 1993
Did your resume get lost in the avalanche of all those others submitted by idealistic baby boomers who want to go to Washington to change the world and drive a BMW?Have you been sitting anxiously by the phone wondering how somebody as brilliant and savvy as you could have been overlooked by a guy from Arkansas?Has your last chance for moving out of your parents' house and getting a real life slipped through your fingers like grits off a razorback?Did you just bend your last saxophone reed?
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | January 31, 1994
THE FINEST INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL CARTOONS OF OUR TIME. Edited by Joe Szabo. Wittyworld Books. 176 pages. $19.95.ANY anthology that bills itself as "the finest" or "the best" of whatever it represents inevitably sets itself up for a fall. Too many worthy candidates for inclusion are left out; too many examples of dubious superiority are put in.Thus it is that the second volume of "The Finest International Political Cartoons of Our Time," edited by Joe Szabo, includes two cartoons by The Sun's Kevin Kallaugher (KAL)
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | October 25, 1992
From Sept. 1 to Oct. 20, The Sun's cartoonist KAL blasted George Bush 7 times while The Evening Sun's Mike Lane hit Mr. Bush 17 times and Dan Quayle twice. They virtually ignored Bill Clinton.According to this informal count, Kevin Kallaugher (KAL) knocked Mr. Clinton and Mr. Bush together twice and all candidates once while Mr. Lane skewered Mr. Clinton once. The artists ridiculed Ross Perot four times.Welcome to the world of the political cartoonist.If you're looking for balance in the normal sense, you won't find it here or in cartoons on other big papers.
FEATURES
By NICK MADIGAN and NICK MADIGAN,SUN REPORTER | June 22, 2006
On a video screen at the Walters Art Museum, President Bush, standing at a lectern adorned with the presidential seal, mutters that he is ready to meet "them pesky media types, the members of the real estate." An aide, offscreen, corrects him. The press, he says, is known as the "fourth estate." If you go Mightier Than the Sword: The Satirical Pen of KAL runs through Sept. 3 at the Walters Art Museum, 600 N. Charles St. Admission is part of the general admission. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Wednesday to Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | November 26, 2000
It was a productive year -- 2000 -- for authors who live in Maryland, and those elsewhere who write about Maryland. Here is the annual, fallible attempt to list their new, general-reader books: Part One, with Part Two to come next Sunday. (S) signifies softbound. Art "Something Coming: Apocalyptic Expectation and Mid-19th Century Painting," by Gail E. Husch (University Press of New England, 305 pages, $29.95). The erosion of tradition and stability, then and still. "Kal Draws the Line: Political Cartoons," by Kevin Kallaugher (SunSource, 168 pages, $14.95)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | August 20, 2000
"KAL Draws the Line: Political Cartoons by Kevin Kallaugher" (SunSource, 167 pages, $16.95) Kevin Kallagher is an esteemed colleague and a warm friend, about whose work I cannot fairly be charged with being objective. Still, as a lifetime superfan of cartoons as well as cartoonists, no one drawing on daily newspaper editorial pages these days brings me more delight than KAL. This, the fourth collection of his work, runs from 1998 to date, and is comfortably arranged by categories - allowing the squeamish to be spared, for example, "Oval Office Affairs" by jumping to "Local Affairs."
TOPIC
December 5, 1999
Like his colleague, Mike Lane, Kevin Kallaugher won his job as a Baltimore Sun cartoonist by sending in a portfolio in 1988 that immediately caught an editor's eye.He was already on his way to an international reputation by reason of his work as chief illustrator for the Economist magazine of London. But he wanted a voice in the politics and mores of his native America and decided to embark on an unusual trans-Atlantic career: Daily cartooning in Baltimore, weekly illustrations (including covers)
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Signe Wilkinson despised the cartoon. The editorial cartoonist drew it in the spring, during the controversy over news leaks in the Monica Lewinsky story, spinning off that theme by picturing reporters chasing Clinton's dog, Buddy. The cartoon warned of "another White House leak" as Buddy relieved himself in the bushes. Wilkinson thought the idea was stupid, hardly befitting her paper, the Philadelphia Daily News.The day the cartoon ran she waited for the critics. Instead, her editors backslapped her and offered more praise than ever.
NEWS
By Jim Bready and Jim Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 1997
(O) means oversize; (P) means paperboundArt, Architecture"A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum," edited by Malcolm Baker and Brenda Richardson (Baltimore Museum of Art, Abrams. 432 pages. Paper, $35; cloth, $60) (O) Exhibition catalogue."American Rowhouse: Classic Designs," by Jonathon Scott Fuqua (Stemmer House. A Barbara Holdridge book. 42 pages. $6.95) (O) (P). An annotated portfolio of fronts and interiors, in line drawings."KAL Draws a Crowd," by Kevin Kallaugher (Woodholme.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 4, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Signe Wilkinson despised the cartoon. The editorial cartoonist drew it in the spring, during the controversy over news leaks in the Monica Lewinsky story, spinning off that theme by picturing reporters chasing Clinton's dog, Buddy. The cartoon warned of "another White House leak" as Buddy relieved himself in the bushes. Wilkinson thought the idea was stupid, hardly befitting her paper, the Philadelphia Daily News.The day the cartoon ran she waited for the critics. Instead, her editors backslapped her and offered more praise than ever.
NEWS
By Jim Bready and Jim Bready,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 1997
(O) means oversize; (P) means paperboundArt, Architecture"A Grand Design: The Art of the Victoria and Albert Museum," edited by Malcolm Baker and Brenda Richardson (Baltimore Museum of Art, Abrams. 432 pages. Paper, $35; cloth, $60) (O) Exhibition catalogue."American Rowhouse: Classic Designs," by Jonathon Scott Fuqua (Stemmer House. A Barbara Holdridge book. 42 pages. $6.95) (O) (P). An annotated portfolio of fronts and interiors, in line drawings."KAL Draws a Crowd," by Kevin Kallaugher (Woodholme.
NEWS
By Neil A. Grauer | January 31, 1994
THE FINEST INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL CARTOONS OF OUR TIME. Edited by Joe Szabo. Wittyworld Books. 176 pages. $19.95.ANY anthology that bills itself as "the finest" or "the best" of whatever it represents inevitably sets itself up for a fall. Too many worthy candidates for inclusion are left out; too many examples of dubious superiority are put in.Thus it is that the second volume of "The Finest International Political Cartoons of Our Time," edited by Joe Szabo, includes two cartoons by The Sun's Kevin Kallaugher (KAL)
FEATURES
January 17, 1993
Did your resume get lost in the avalanche of all those others submitted by idealistic baby boomers who want to go to Washington to change the world and drive a BMW?Have you been sitting anxiously by the phone wondering how somebody as brilliant and savvy as you could have been overlooked by a guy from Arkansas?Has your last chance for moving out of your parents' house and getting a real life slipped through your fingers like grits off a razorback?Did you just bend your last saxophone reed?
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