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March 19, 1991
A solid majority of Evening Sun readers and other callers to Lou Cedrone's SUNDIAL Oscar Line believe Kevin Costner will be named Best Director for "Dances With Wolves" when the Oscars are handed out next Monday night.Sixty-seven percent of the 117 respondents in a telephone survey conducted last Tuesday chose Costner, followed by Martin Scorsese for "GoodFellas" (14 percent), Francis Ford Coppola for "Godfather Part III" (10 percent), Stephen Frears for "The Grifters" (5 percent) and Barbet Schroeder for "Reversal of Fortune" (4 percent)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
Kevin Costner, a superstar for two dozen years, hasn't had a big film hit in years. But overseas and out of camera sight, he's been renewing connections with international fans — as a singer. Releasing CDs in Europe while performing on three continents, he's won a global following as a country-tinged rocker, punching out songs that fit his native-Californian, rambling-child-of-the-'60s spirit. And now he's bringing it all back home. Costner and his band, Modern West, are putting the final touches on a concept album inspired by the History Channel miniseries, "Hatfields & McCoys," a three-night dramatization of the epochal feud starring Costner as "Devil" Anse Hatfield, airing Memorial Day weekend.
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FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 5, 1992
Kevin Costner, who plays New Orleans district attorney Jim Garrison in the Oliver Stone film "JFK," has purchased a getaway home in California's Santa Barbara County.Mr. Costner's permanent residence is in the foothills near Glendale, Calif.His getaway home is a five-bedroom, 6,000-square-foot-plus house in a gated community just south of Montecito, Calif. He paid about $3 million for it, sources say.The year-old home has a guest suite with its own entrance, two children's bedrooms and a large master bedroom with a 40-foot deck facing the ocean.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 15, 2007
When Kevin Costner told an interviewer that the writers of his serial-killer thriller Mr. Brooks presented it to him as a potential trilogy, warning lights should have flashed for him and everyone else. Was that why the already-bloated film floated the suggestion that serial killing could be hereditary? Did the filmmakers envision a Daughter of Mr. Brooks down the line? The success of the Star Wars movies and The Lord of the Rings films have roused trilogy-mania among Hollywood moviemakers.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 21, 1991
THE THING I want to make clear is that this is not an indictment of Kevin Costner, who happens to be a fine (if uneven) actor and not a bad fellow, once you get past his reported mood swings.For the record, I like Kevin Costner -- even though everywhere you go it's Kevin Costner this and Kevin Costner that and he's on the cover of this magazine and doing that talk show and generally lending a whole new meaning to the term "overexposed."But I don't begrudge him his successes. His movies have donwell.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney | November 1, 1991
ROBIN HOOD: PRINCE OF THIEVESWarner Home Video$24.95There are more things wrong than right with this latest film version of the Robin Hood legend, but that didn't stop summer audiences from lining up at movies theaters -- they were happy, it seems, just to feast their eyes on Kevin Costner again.Mr. Costner is just plain uneasy in the title role -- a fact that many will find difficult to ignore from the first scene on. A director with more savvy than Kevin Reynolds might have gone with Mr. Costner's unease and awkwardness, somehow turning it into the fuel that powers Robin's story and his fate.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | April 12, 1991
Simon Says:Do you think the Kennedys could get a family rate on exorcisms?Never trust anyone who puts milk in his tea.Aww c'mon, could Kevin Costner really be that humble?I have never watched a duller sport than polo.Could cab drivers really be comfortable sitting on those beads?In one case, a woman midshipman at the Naval Academy is abducted from her room, dragged to a men's washroom, handcuffed to a urinal, taunted and photographed and, after much foot-dragging, her abductors are given demerits.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 15, 2003
Old-pro Western directors like Budd Boetticher could stage entire tales of vengeance and redemption, with ambushes, shoot-outs and reversals of character, in less time than a revisionist like Kevin Costner takes to tie his bedrolls. Costner is now underrated as an actor. When he works with Ron Shelton on films like Bull Durham and Tin Cup, he's a quick-witted, casual romantic. As a director, though, he's interminably self-important. In Open Range, he and his screenwriter, Craig Storper, try to transform cowboy novelist Lauran Paine's unassuming 1990 oater, The Open Range Men, into an epic statement on rough justice and frontier life.
FEATURES
By Philip Wuntch and Philip Wuntch,Dallas Morning News | June 24, 1991
A mere 2 1/2 months ago, Kevin Costner was a golden boy who could do no wrong.Casual in speech and manner, he was handsome in a way that infatuated female audiences without alienating the male constituency of moviegoers. As the star, director and creative force behind "Dances With Wolves," he seemed politically correct and terribly earnest.Then "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves" was unleashed upon an eager public. Its box-office response is not a point of concern. Audiences seem to love it. During its opening weekend, it grossed a spectacular $25.6 million.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 6, 1994
His kid co-stars rate him "cool, real cool" and "very natural -- he doesn't have a big head."His director likens him to Gary Cooper and calls him the "archetypal decent man."Kevin Costner himself says he's nearing meltdown, that he's physically and spiritually drained, having done four films back-to-back in 1 1/2 years, including "The War," which opened Friday, and the now-in-production and over-budget "Waterworld" (price tag: a record $140 million).Before you can ask, "What makes Kevin run?"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 1, 2007
"There's dead and then there's dead," quipped Kevin Costner as a Coast Guard swimmer in The Guardian. He could have used that line in the inflated suspense film Mr. Brooks. He plays the title character, a serial killer with a double life and double standards. The successful owner of a chic Portland, Ore., box company, with a comely wife (Marg Helgenberger) and a smart, pretty daughter (Danielle Panabaker), he knows he kills out of compulsion - he goes to AA meetings and confesses he's an addict.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 29, 2006
The Guardian is that rarest of cinematic commodities: an action movie displaying brains and heart and the opportunity for its stars to do something more than keep the narrative flowing between explosions. Perhaps that should come as no surprise, as it was directed by Andrew Davis, whose 1993 The Fugitive remains a high-water mark for modern action-adventure flicks. It's also one of the few in which the acting - especially Tommy Lee Jones' Oscar-winning turn as a no-nonsense U.S. marshal - was as lauded as the action.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2006
A feature in which Sun writers and critics sound off about the movies. There's no easier route to Oscar's heart than pulling off a tough physical transformation. This year is no exception, whether it's George Clooney's gaining 30 pounds for Syriana and acting every bit the burned-out case, or Philip Seymour Hoffman shedding 30 to 40 pounds for Capote and turning into a dapper man of letters. Of course, their characterizations were terrific, inside and out. But what about a performer who simply shows up on a set looking overweight and then wrings every nip of comic and dramatic juice out of a role?
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | March 21, 2005
IT FEELS LIKE alumni week for me. I went and saw the new Kevin Costner (Cal State-Fullerton, Class of 1978) movie over the weekend, and tomorrow night I'm going to see my Titans play at Georgetown in the National Invitation Tournament. I know I wrote last week that the NIT doesn't mean a whole lot, but that was before CSUF (21-10) defeated Oregon State and the University of San Francisco to set up an East Coast showdown with the Hoyas. I can only hope that the evening is slightly more upbeat than The Upside of Anger, but I'm going to be all kinds of nostalgic either way. The last time the Titans basketball team was in an NCAA postseason basketball game of any sort was way back in '78, and I rode a rooter bus from Fullerton to Albuquerque - an 18-hour trip - to sit in the student section for the regional at the University of New Mexico.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | March 18, 2005
Joan Allen used to specialize in mice, but she becomes the mouse that roared in Mike Binder's original, unfailingly entertaining marital-breakup movie The Upside of Anger. As Pat Nixon in Nixon and Elizabeth Proctor in The Crucible, Allen played to perfection the long-suffering wife. Not here. As Terry Wolfmeyer, a mother of four girls who is unfailingly "nice" up to the moment her husband leaves her, Allen uses her pale, slender beauty like a stiletto. Terry pokes holes in family memories, her daughters' dreams and the ego of the lover who means to save her - Denny Davies (Kevin Costner)
FEATURES
By Robert Philpot and Robert Philpot,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 18, 2003
Fans of the '90s TV show Homicide: Life on the Street will remember Clark Johnson as Meldrick Lewis, the funky, porkpie-hat-wearing detective who had a way with a laid-back one-liner. They might also note that they haven't seen much of him since the show left the air in 1999. That's because Johnson has been busier behind the camera. The actor has become a director, responsible for such quality TV as the premiere of The Shield and episodes of The Wire, Soul Food and The West Wing. This month, Johnson stepped up to the big screen - oddly enough, with a movie based on a TV show.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | June 1, 2007
"There's dead and then there's dead," quipped Kevin Costner as a Coast Guard swimmer in The Guardian. He could have used that line in the inflated suspense film Mr. Brooks. He plays the title character, a serial killer with a double life and double standards. The successful owner of a chic Portland, Ore., box company, with a comely wife (Marg Helgenberger) and a smart, pretty daughter (Danielle Panabaker), he knows he kills out of compulsion - he goes to AA meetings and confesses he's an addict.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 15, 2003
Old-pro Western directors like Budd Boetticher could stage entire tales of vengeance and redemption, with ambushes, shoot-outs and reversals of character, in less time than a revisionist like Kevin Costner takes to tie his bedrolls. Costner is now underrated as an actor. When he works with Ron Shelton on films like Bull Durham and Tin Cup, he's a quick-witted, casual romantic. As a director, though, he's interminably self-important. In Open Range, he and his screenwriter, Craig Storper, try to transform cowboy novelist Lauran Paine's unassuming 1990 oater, The Open Range Men, into an epic statement on rough justice and frontier life.
FEATURES
By Roger Moore and Roger Moore,ORLANDO SENTINEL | August 12, 2003
Kevin Costner could use a hit. Badly. His glorious Dances With Wolves Oscar night was more than a dozen years ago. He hasn't really been in a winner since Tin Cup was released in 1996. "What has emerged [in his recent films] is the most blatant example in screen history of an actor following his own fantasies," critic David Thomson has written of him. Costner might have had something he wanted to say or do with Dragonfly, Message in a Bottle, Thirteen Days, 3000 Miles to Graceland, The Postman or For Love of the Game.
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