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NEWS
By Annette Gooch and Annette Gooch,universal press syndicate | January 9, 2000
There's some strategy to making good seafood soup: Use good-quality fish or shellfish, add the ingredients in stages, and don't overcook. Fresh fish and shellfish should be mild-smelling, with no fishy odor or trace of ammonia, and the flesh should feel firm. If you buy previously frozen seafood, be sure it hasn't been defrosted longer than two days. Because a soup made with fish or seafood combines ingredients with varying cooking times, you'll need to add the different items in stages.
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FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | September 15, 1999
DURING THE Baltimore mayoral primary, I kept waiting to hear a candidate promise that, if elected, he would put a chicken in every barbecue kettle. Maybe I missed it, but nobody I heard ever mentioned chicken.Among the Demo- crats, Carl Stokes wanted to put brooms in residents' hands to clean up the city. Martin O'Malley wanted to put in a new policing policy, and Lawrence Bell wanted to put in a City-Hall hot line.Among the Republicans, David Tufaro wanted to cut property taxes, and Carl Adair wanted to keep the city from getting too crowded.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1999
With a hymn, a prayer and an official blessing, the Dorsey family opened its 50th annual reunion in Sykesville yesterday.Some 100 descendants of Ed and Carrie Dorsey, nearly all wearing T-shirts printed with the family tree, watched as Mayor Jonathan S. Herman presented 88-year-old Thelma Dorsey Jackson with a key to the town. Letters of congratulations also arrived from state Sen. Larry E. Haines and Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski.Dorseys have lived in Sykesville for more than a century, longer than the town of 3,500 has been a town.
NEWS
By Lourdes Sullivan and Lourdes Sullivan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 14, 1999
JUDY CEPHAS is the new Gifted and Talented Program resource teacher at Patuxent Valley Middle School. A dedicated educator, she's taking 150 pupils to New York City to see a Broadway production this month.But that's not why she called this reporter.Cephas, who is spending her first year in our area -- although she has worked at other Howard County schools -- is a big fan of other staff members at the school. And she is really impressed by the work of Suzanne Gross' sixth-grade reading class.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | April 7, 1999
ON A RECENT soft spring evening, I subjected the backyard grill to a bout of spring cleaning.Like a lot of chest-thumpers, I had cooked on the grill during the winter. It was a point of manly pride or, at least, it seemed to be. But after several months of fighting an icy wind, I began to think the impulse to cook outdoors in bad weather might be the sign of some genetic flaw, nature's way of saying that I was not the brightest porch light on the block.After all, generations of civilized men had been erecting structures that sheltered them from inclement weather.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | January 24, 1999
A STEADY DIET OF fried food may not be good for your arteries, but an occasional fried fish does wonders for your spirit. I am a fan of fried fish and have noticed that the aroma of fried fish gets stronger as I move closer to the Atlantic Ocean. After years of sniffing my way around Maryland on U.S. 50 east and U.S. 13 south, I have developed a mental map of fried-fish eateries.It works this way. As I head east from the Bay Bridge, I start counting rivers. The more rivers I cross, the greater the likelihood that the fish served in local restaurants will be fried.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1998
The national shortage of Salvation Army bell-ringers and red kettle-minders has washed right over LaVerne Schmidt.She stands in front of Cross Street Market, a 53-year-old grandmother of eight, 112 pounds of cheerful "Merry Christmases" from Armistead Gardens. Her children and her husband told her she wouldn't be able to stand on her feet eight hours a day, six days a week.But she does it. "Thank you, hon," she says to a woman who made the red kettle clang. "God bless you."She told her children she was going to try it, at $6.50 an hour.
FEATURES
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Sun Staff | August 2, 1998
My wife has never touched my barbecue grills.This thought came to me with the fury of a grease flare-up as I wrestled with charcoal, flame and a beef brisket for five hours one recent Saturday afternoon. Why does she keep her distance?My Smokey Joe, my trusty 22-inch kettle (Oh, what incendiary moments we've shared!), my three-burner propane barbecue with built-in "Flavorizer" bars - how could she not share my infatuation for their sizzle and smoke?Even this summer when she bought me a new gas-powered model (which, I believe, pumps out enough BTUs to put grill marks on concrete)
NEWS
By Joseph R. L. Sterne and Joseph R. L. Sterne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 1, 1998
Many years later, Theodore Roosevelt looked back on his "great day," July 1, 1898."It was a lovely morning," he wrote, "the sky a cloudless blue, while the level shimmering rays of the just-risen sun brought into relief the splendid palms which here and there towered above the lower growth. The lofty and beautiful mountains hemmed in the Santiago plain, making it an amphitheater for the battle."No mention there of the suffocating tropical heat, the mud, the confusion, the abominable slop that passed for rations, the stink of death and hasty latrines.
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | December 1, 1996
BOMBAY HOOK, Del. -- When the Dutch acquired this marshy point from the Indians in 1679, they called it Boompies Hoock. It's said the price they paid was a musket and powder, some liquor and a steel kettle -- about what they paid to buy Manhattan. I'd rather have Bombay Hook.Since 1937 there has been a national wildlife refuge here, more than 16,000 acres worth, mostly marsh but also including some wooded upland and several big freshwater ponds. Tidal rivers like the Leipsic, Duck Creek and my favorite, Old Woman's Gut, pass through it. It's a wonderful place to see birds of all kinds, especially migrants.
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