Advertisement
HomeCollectionsKettle
IN THE NEWS

Kettle

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 8, 2002
Where: 8949 Baltimore St., Savage. Phone: 301-725-8838. Hours: 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday; 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Prices: $3.95 to $6.95. Credit cards: Cash only.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 5, 2014
Last week, the Maryland Democratic Party took a swipe at Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan for his decision to use public campaign financing during the primary and general elections, noting in a news release that Mr. Hogan, "who often claims to be the only candidate who will protect tax dollars, received over $320,000 in taxpayer funds for the Republican primary and nearly $2.6 million for the general election. " But a story today in the Washington Post about the free flow of campaign contributions from the owner of one of Maryland's casino licenses to the coffers of the Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, and his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, offers a reminder of just how wise an investment public campaign financing is. The Democratic party is trying to make hay out of the idea that some of those taxpayer funds (donated willingly, incidentally, through a check-off box on state income tax returns)
Advertisement
NEWS
August 11, 2011
In response to Doug Mainwaring's op-ed piece ("Why the name calling?" Aug. 10), I agree that the name calling is not appropriate and that there should be more civil ways to communicate disagreement and different views. But I do have two questions which may point out why I think the tea party is just another political group with their own selfish motives and not the good of our country. 1. Why is the deficit only President Barack Obama's fault? 2. Where is Mr. Mainwaring when the Republicans are calling President Obama and the Democrats names?
NEWS
December 12, 2013
Is it me, or does anyone else see the irony of mega web companies like Apple, Google and Facebook calling for tighter controls on how the government collects personal data? In this scenario, are those companies the pot or the kettle? The pot, I think. Jonathan S. Rosenthal, Pasadena - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
December 18, 2005
On December 16, 2005, ROBERT J. KETTLE, beloved husband of Mary T. Kettle, stepfather of Mary Mulligan, Larry Mulligan, and John Mulligan, Sr., grandfather of Debbie Brooks, Shawn Mulligan and John Mulligan, Jr., and three great-grandchildren. Brother of Edward Kettle and Mary Jane Hoffman. Also survived several by nieces and nephews. Services private. Donation in his memory to Seasons Hospice, 7008 Security Blvd., Suite 300, Baltimore 21244. (nee Stehling), beloved wife of the late John J. Keys; devoted mother of John R. Keys; loving grandmother of Hunter, Logan, and Jessica Keys; dear sister of Robert Stehling and Audrey English.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | December 16, 1991
Havre de Grace. -- These are difficult times, there's no getting around it, and so it was with unusual trepidation that I ventured out this year for what has become an annual appearance as a seasonal bell-ringer for the Salvation Army.In the past, as a rule, this has tended to be a happy experience. Christmas shopping may be a stressful undertaking for many people, as it certainly is for me, but that never seemed to dampen their charitable impulses. Without fail, when I would conclude my two-hour stint in Bel Air's Harford Mall and turn over my post to a successor, the Army's little kettle would be stuffed with contributions and my own faith in humanity's basic decency shored up for another year.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
A tea kettle left on a stove in a fourth-floor apartment caused a three-alarm fire on Friday night that displaced 100 seniors from a complex in Northwest Baltimore and caused an estimated $280,000 in damage, according to fire investigators. No one was injured in the blaze that broke out shortly before 11 p.m. in the garden-style apartment complex in the Cheswolde neighborhood, in the 6300 block of Red Cedar Place. Residents were taken to a nearby condominium complex, and the fire was confined to two apartments.
NEWS
August 5, 2014
Last week, the Maryland Democratic Party took a swipe at Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan for his decision to use public campaign financing during the primary and general elections, noting in a news release that Mr. Hogan, "who often claims to be the only candidate who will protect tax dollars, received over $320,000 in taxpayer funds for the Republican primary and nearly $2.6 million for the general election. " But a story today in the Washington Post about the free flow of campaign contributions from the owner of one of Maryland's casino licenses to the coffers of the Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, and his running mate, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman, offers a reminder of just how wise an investment public campaign financing is. The Democratic party is trying to make hay out of the idea that some of those taxpayer funds (donated willingly, incidentally, through a check-off box on state income tax returns)
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | September 15, 1999
DURING THE Baltimore mayoral primary, I kept waiting to hear a candidate promise that, if elected, he would put a chicken in every barbecue kettle. Maybe I missed it, but nobody I heard ever mentioned chicken.Among the Demo- crats, Carl Stokes wanted to put brooms in residents' hands to clean up the city. Martin O'Malley wanted to put in a new policing policy, and Lawrence Bell wanted to put in a City-Hall hot line.Among the Republicans, David Tufaro wanted to cut property taxes, and Carl Adair wanted to keep the city from getting too crowded.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | February 11, 1994
It's been voted "Baltimore's Best" for its shredded pork barbecue sauce. But to locals, Ma's Kettle in Savage is the place to go for talk."Hell is six inches of ice covering the land," waitress Metta Lash says to no one in particular.It's the kind of free-flowing talk that characterizes the old restaurant off Baltimore Street across from Savage Guilford Road."It's a slice of home in an otherwise inhuman world," says Pete Dykstra, a Crownsville resident who stops in at least twice a week."People talk to each other here," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick | November 30, 2012
Kettle Hill has closed. Inspired by the life and spirit of Theodore Roosevelt, Kettle Hill opened April 20 on Market Place as the anchor restaurant in the Power Plant Live complex. The team behind Kettle Hill were Keystone Hospitality partners Desmond Reilly and Kristopher Carr. In a nightlife review of Kettle Hill, The Baltimore Sun's Wesley Case wrote that "Kettle Hill is a strong anchor for Power Plant Live's needed face-lift, which includes the additions of Joe Squared and Leinenkugel Beer Garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2012
Kettle Hill starts lunch service on Tuesday. Lunch hours are 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tuesday through Sunday. And on Friday, the downtown restaurant is christening its new patio with a grand opening party from 4-7 p.m. Speaking of decks, the crab deck at Philips Seafood should be fully operational soon. The big red umbrellas are already in place, and you can already hang out with a frozen drink and nibble on some light bites at a picnic table. But the deck menu isn't up and running yet. No firm date on the opening.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Evan Siple | June 6, 2012
Power Plant Live newcomer Kettle Hill, a "Theodore Roosevelt-themed" establishment replete with lively, wood-and-iron-and-brass layouts, is a solid rustic-yet-fun place to hang out after work. It's a spot for working professionals with a bit of grown-up taste. Like the atmosphere, the cocktail menu, as bartender Daniel Clemmer puts it aptly, "is sophisticated, but approachable without being pretentious. " One of the freshest examples is the Church and State, a Herradura Tequila-based cocktail with fresh-squeezed lemon juice, fresh pineapple juice, cinnamon simple syrup and honkin' 2-by-2 inch ice cubes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2012
Kettle Hill has announced an opening date. Inspired, its operators say, by the life and spirit of Theodore Roosevelt, Kettle Hill will open April 20 on Market Place as the anchor restaurant in the Power Plant Live complex. The restaurant's name is inspired by the military exploits of Roosevelt and his Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War. San Juan Hill is better remembered today than Kettle Hill, but Kettle Hill is a great name for a restaurant. The team behind Kettle Hill is made up of Keystone Hospitality partners Desmond Reilly and Kristopher Carr, whose infatuation with Roosevelt's take-charge ethos has also inspired the name for the bar within Kettle Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
Kettle Hill has announced an opening date. Inspired, its operators say, by the life and spirit of Theodore Roosevelt, Kettle Hill will open on April 20 on Market Place as the anchor restaurant in the Power Plant Live complex. The restaurant's name is inspired by the military exploits of Roosevelt and his Rough Riders during the Spanish-American War. San Juan Hill is better remembered today than Kettle Hill, but Kettle Hill is a great name for a restaurant. The team behind Kettle Hill are Keystone Hospitality partners Desmond Reilly and Kristopher Carr, whose growing infatuation with Roosevelt's take-charge ethos has also inspired the name for the bar within Kettle Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2012
A 250-seat American bistro named Kettle Hill will open in the old Babalu space on the corner of Water Street and Market Place. Kettle Hill is partnership between area newcomer Keystone Hospitality and former Baltimore Oriole Rick Dempsey. The principal partners of Keystone Hospitality, formerly based New York City , are Desmond Reilly and Kristopher Karr. According to the press release from the property's landlord, Reilly and Karr were "inspired by local legend Rick Dempsey, who had been looking for some time to launch a restaurant project.
NEWS
By Jody Vilschick and Jody Vilschick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 1, 2001
In February, the modest sign proclaiming Country Kettle's opening brought immediate results, owner and co-chef Amy Crooks says. "We filled up immediately. And people around here said, `Thank God it's not another pizza and subs place,'" she says. "That sign's been our only advertising. We're really depending on word of mouth." Crooks acknowledges, however, that she is going to have to overcome the local concern that Country Kettle might resemble the bar that was previously in the building.
NEWS
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1998
The national shortage of Salvation Army bell-ringers and red kettle-minders has washed right over LaVerne Schmidt.She stands in front of Cross Street Market, a 53-year-old grandmother of eight, 112 pounds of cheerful "Merry Christmases" from Armistead Gardens. Her children and her husband told her she wouldn't be able to stand on her feet eight hours a day, six days a week.But she does it. "Thank you, hon," she says to a woman who made the red kettle clang. "God bless you."She told her children she was going to try it, at $6.50 an hour.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
A tea kettle left on a stove in a fourth-floor apartment caused a three-alarm fire on Friday night that displaced 100 seniors from a complex in Northwest Baltimore and caused an estimated $280,000 in damage, according to fire investigators. No one was injured in the blaze that broke out shortly before 11 p.m. in the garden-style apartment complex in the Cheswolde neighborhood, in the 6300 block of Red Cedar Place. Residents were taken to a nearby condominium complex, and the fire was confined to two apartments.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.