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NEWS
May 7, 2004
On May 2004, BARABA KESWICK TRUAX, 56, born in Los Angeles CA. She is survived by her children David, Brian, Catherine and Jacqueline, all of Baltimore, and Alicia Keswick of Temecula, CA; her mother, Alicia Keswick of Temecula, CA; her sister Lorraine Dillender (Les) of Placentia, CA, her sister Eileen Keswick of Temecula, CA, and her brother William Keswick (Judy) of Chico, CA. She is also survived her niece Angela Dillender (John) of Oakland, CA. A Memorial Service will be held Saturday, May 8, at the Church of the Nativity, Timonium, at 12 P.M.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | July 30, 2013
Hampden has a sinkhole and it's a doozy - 25 feet down to the aging storm-drain infrastructure underneath Keswick Road at 37th Street. A Baltimore City emergency contract crew has been working since the last week of June to fix what Kurt Kocher, a Department of Public Works spokesman called β€œan explainable hole,” caused by storm-drain damage and erosion. Traffic is being redirected during the construction, except for local traffic on a mostly residential block. Also known as a sinking, the hole began as a depression of 4 to 5 feet, at the south end of the Johns Hopkins at Keswick complex, just north of a Royal Farms store and two blocks from The Avenue.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
At least 12 people with symptoms of illness were reported at Johns Hopkins at Keswick in North Baltimore on Monday, almost a week after nearly two dozen people fell ill from a contaminated water source at the hospital and university system's administrative complex. Again, personnel with the Baltimore Fire Department descended on the two-building complex, with multiple medics, a fire engine and a hazardous-materials unit responding, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a department spokesman.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
Margaret W. "Mardie" Robinson, a homemaker and volunteer, died Thursday from respiratory failure at Roland Park Place. She was 101. The daughter of a lumber company executive and a homemaker, Margaret Wilson Wood was born on Forest Road, now Keswick Road, in Roland Park, and was later raised on Woodlawn Road. Mrs. Robinson was the sister of H. Graham Wood, the noted Chesapeake Bay steamboat historian and author, who died in 1998. After graduating from Roland Park Country School in 1931, she worked as an administrator in a dental office and later for Anne Weems Williams, a Roland Park interior decorator.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Employees who were barred from their offices on the Johns Hopkins at Keswick campus because of water contamination have been granted additional paid leave days, human resources officials said Friday. Employees in the campus' south building, which was closed two days, will get two days of added leave, said Pamela Paulk and Charlene Moore Hayes, executives for Hopkins' health system and university, in an email to employees who work at the North Baltimore office complex. "You will be able to use the two days as you wish," the human resources officials said.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
Several more people fell ill at the Johns Hopkins at Keswick campus this week, following an incident last month in which nearly two dozen employees reported dizziness, nausea and headaches. Officials have tied the previous illnesses to a hot water heater that became contaminated with nitrites when a technician accidentally inserted the chemicals into the drinking water system instead of the heating system. Overexposure to nitrites can cause a range of symptoms that include difficulty breathing.
NEWS
By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,brent.jones@baltsun.com | October 15, 2008
Hundreds of Roland Park residents packed a community meeting last night to hear Keswick Multi-Care representatives promote their plans to build a facility for the elderly, but few were persuaded by the company's arguments. Keswick administrators and project architects told the crowd at Roland Park Elementary School that the $195 million proposal would not increase traffic in the neighborhood and would leave undeveloped most of the 17 acres being acquired for the project. Baltimore Country Club is planning to sell the land to Keswick for $12.5 million.
NEWS
December 3, 2003
Claire N. Carney, a retired accounting clerk at Keswick Multi-Care Center, died of multiple organ failure Nov. 26 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 87 and a resident of Pinewood Avenue in Hamilton for more than a half-century. Claire Naomi Chester was born in Baltimore and raised on Brentwood Avenue. She was a 1933 graduate of the former Seton High School in Charles Village and had recently attended her 70th class reunion. She was married in 1941 to Owen B. Carney Jr., a postal worker, and settled on Pinewood Avenue.
NEWS
By Janet Felsten | July 10, 2008
Let's take a broader view of the issue The Sun presented in letters to the editor as "Open space fight roils Roland Park." Keswick Multi-care Center desires to build a high-end senior living facility, including 225 independent-living units, 58 assisted-living units and 40 beds for residents in need of skilled nursing. Across the street from Keswick's current facilities, Hekemian & Co. desires to develop the many acres of impervious surface that surround the Rotunda shopping center, including residential units (302 apartments, 44 condos and 12 townhouses, according to the last publicly available description)
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | March 14, 2009
The Keswick Multi-Care Center in Baltimore scrapped its plans yesterday to build a multimillion-dollar retirement community on Roland Park land long owned by the Baltimore Country Club after learning the City Council would not support the proposal, Keswick's chief executive officer said. Keswick overcame the first hurdle to purchasing the 17 acres when two-thirds of the club's voting members approved the $12.5 million sale last year. But the transaction also was contingent on City Council approval of the more than 275-unit development, which many Roland Park residents actively opposed.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
Linda Kellar seemed too young for dementia, the slow-forming disease that erodes the memories of people usually much older than the then-54-year-old housewife. But in 2009 that's what doctors found to be the cause of Kellar's severe agitation, memory loss, sleepless nights, babbling and hallucinations. Kellar now spends her days at Keswick Multi-Care Center under constant care because of the disease, which has progressed steadily since the diagnosis. Her husband, Arnold, knows that dementia will eventually take his wife's life.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2013
Several more people fell ill at the Johns Hopkins at Keswick campus this week, following an incident last month in which nearly two dozen employees reported dizziness, nausea and headaches. Officials have tied the previous illnesses to a hot water heater that became contaminated with nitrites when a technician accidentally inserted the chemicals into the drinking water system instead of the heating system. Overexposure to nitrites can cause a range of symptoms that include difficulty breathing.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
Employees who were barred from their offices on the Johns Hopkins at Keswick campus because of water contamination have been granted additional paid leave days, human resources officials said Friday. Employees in the campus' south building, which was closed two days, will get two days of added leave, said Pamela Paulk and Charlene Moore Hayes, executives for Hopkins' health system and university, in an email to employees who work at the North Baltimore office complex. "You will be able to use the two days as you wish," the human resources officials said.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
They weren't allowed to be at work, but now they're paying for being absent. Some administrative employees who were barred from the Johns Hopkins at Keswick complex in North Baltimore twice in the last two weeks because the buildings were closed due to outbreaks of illness are being told to use personal time or vacation days to make up for the time missed, Johns Hopkins officials confirmed Wednesday. Others were working overtime to catch up. For example, the majority of 284 patient financial services employees who work on the fifth floor of the Keswick complex's south building worked overtime hours three days last week - including Saturday - to make up for the day they had missed.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2013
Officials on Tuesday continued investigating the second round of illnesses in less than a week at a North Baltimore office building but did not quickly find a link between the two bouts. Still, officials overseeing the investigation are confident that the building is safe and have decided it will be open for business on Wednesday. The water heater that was identified as the source of last week's sicknesses β€” more than 20 people reported headaches, breathing problems and dizziness β€” was taken offline before the building, part of the Johns Hopkins at Keswick campus, was reopened.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
At least 12 people with symptoms of illness were reported at Johns Hopkins at Keswick in North Baltimore on Monday, almost a week after nearly two dozen people fell ill from a contaminated water source at the hospital and university system's administrative complex. Again, personnel with the Baltimore Fire Department descended on the two-building complex, with multiple medics, a fire engine and a hazardous-materials unit responding, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a department spokesman.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
The Keswick Multi-Care Center has emerged empty-handed from talks it had hoped might salvage a share of a $28 million bequest it was unable to accept because of the will's racist conditions.Settlement negotiations between Keswick and the University of Maryland Medical System broke down Tuesday. Keswick's attorneys said they have no choice but to appeal a Baltimore judge's ruling last week awarding the money to University.Dr. Jesse C. Coggins' 1962 will promised the money to Keswick if it would build new housing for white patients and name it after him. If Keswick could not accept those terms, the money was to go to University.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN REPORTER | June 17, 2008
Keswick Multi-Care Center in Baltimore plans to build a $195 million continuing-care retirement community on Roland Park land now owned by the Baltimore Country Club, its CEO said yesterday. Keswick has agreed to buy 17 acres of club property where members once played tennis. The sale requires approval by two-thirds of the club's 2,000 voting members, with a vote set for July 15. A letter sent by the Baltimore Country Club to members said the price was $12.5 million, which Keswick confirmed.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
The Baltimore Health Department said late Wednesday that investigators believe a faulty hot water heater sickened 23 people at the Johns Hopkins at Keswick complex this week. An estimated 600 people were evacuated from the complex Tuesday afternoon after people reported difficulty breathing. Standard checks by emergency officials ruled out exposure to carbon monoxide, explosives, hydrogen sulfide and low oxygen. Investigators said they also were examining the possibility of food contamination.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
The cafeteria at the Johns Hopkins at Keswick complex was shut down Tuesday after 18 people were sickened with an unknown condition and 600 evacuated from the building in North Baltimore. Fire and emergency management officials are still investigating what caused the illness that gave employees breathing problems, but one of the theories is possible food contamination. We are "trying to chase down what everybody ate," said Connor Scott, a spokesman with the Mayor's Office of Emergency Management.
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