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Kernan Hospital

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NEWS
July 24, 2013
A recent Sun Article by Andrea Walker discussed the University of Maryland Medical Center's intention to rename Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital ("Kernan hospital changing name," July 8). James Lawrence Kernan was a Baltimore businessman who owned theaters and hotels. Mr. Kernan moved into one of his hotels and converted his mansion and estate to a hospital for children and later to include adults who required rehabilitative care. During his lifetime, Mr. Kernan watched his dream come true and the hospital become a success.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Ruth E. Eger, the former executive director of the Joseph Richey Hospice who lectured widely on death and dying, died June 9 of pneumonia at Saint Agnes Hospital. She had just celebrated her 80th birthday. "Ruth was the most spirited and positive-thinking person. No problem was so big that we couldn't grow and learn from it, and she found that in everybody," said Catherine M. Frome, who was named clinical director of the Joseph Richey Hospice in April. "She turned Joseph Richey Hospice around and made its finances viable in order to care for the underserved in Baltimore," said Ms. Frome.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
The federal government has filed a lawsuit against Kernan Hospital seeking $8.1 million because of what is says was improper billing to the Medicare and Medicaid system. The lawsuit filed by the Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Defense accuses the rehabilitation hospital in Baltimore of falsely manipulating its computerized billing system so that it looked like patients had a severe form of malnutrition called kwashiorkor. Hospitals are compensated more for a patient who has a more severe and complex diagnosis.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2013
Betsey R. Spragins, a member of the original Women's Hospital Foundation board at Greater Baltimore Medical Center where she volunteered for 40 years, died Monday of heart failure at the Broadmead retirement community in Cockeysville, where she had lived since 1995. The former longtime Lutherville resident was 91. The daughter of John Lathrop Rochester, who was an insurance executive, and Elizabeth White Rochester, a homemaker, the former Betsey Rochester was born and raised in Dunkirk, N.Y. She was a direct descendant of Nathaniel Rochester, a Revolutionary War soldier and land speculator, who founded the settlement that became Rochester, N.Y. After graduating in 1940 from Buffalo Seminary, a private girls school, she earned a bachelor's degree in 1944 from Smith College.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
City emergency management officials are working with officials at Kernan Hospital to restore water after a water main break on its Dickeyville campus cut its supply, officials said late Wednesday morning. Gaylene Adamczyk, a hospital spokeswoman, said the hospital was never fully without water and is not evacuating its patients, though emergency officials had said that was being considered. "We are maintaining our clinical operations at this time," Adamczyk said about 12:45 p.m. The orthopedics and rehabilitation hospital has 118 patients, said Ian Brennan, a Baltimore Fire spokesman.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 3, 1996
Louis Bassett, whose rector described him as a "gentle soul" who devoted his life to the care and needs of patients at James Lawrence Kernan Hospital, died Monday of a stroke at Northampton Manor Nursing Home in Frederick. He was 81.Mr. Bassett, known as "Whitey," came to the hospital near Dickeyville as an orphan of 14 and remained there for the rest of his life, working as an orderly.A familiar figure dressed in his hospital whites until retiring in 1982, Mr. Bassett continued living on the grounds of Kernan's until he entered the Odd Fellows Home in 1992.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield | April 24, 2002
Loyola High lacrosse midfielder Daniel O'Hara, who was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center after suffering head and facial injuries in an April 13 car accident, is scheduled to be released from Kernan Hospital in Woodlawn today, his mother, Pat O'Hara, said last night. O'Hara was on a respirator for 12 hours after the accident. "Dan's gentle personality and good humor are intact," Pat O'Hara said of her son, who has suffered short-term memory loss. He will receive outpatient therapy from the Kennedy Krieger Institute.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | March 23, 1993
The world of stars met the world of stitches yesterday -- and left its mark."I'm saving this side for Shirley MacLaine," said X-ray technician Laura Smith, indicating the still-blank right side of a lab coat that flaunted a freshly scrawled "Nicolas Cage" on the left. "But she seems very guarded."Which is appropriate, since Ms. MacLaine is the "Tess" and Mr. Cage is the "guard" in the coming movie, "Guarding Tess," that is being filmed in and around Baltimore.Yesterday, the filming took them to Kernan Hospital, an orthopedic rehabilitation facility in the Dickeyville area of West Baltimore and "a pretty quiet place until this happened," according to Ms. Smith.
NEWS
May 10, 2008
Betty Loretta Pruce, a former Kernan Hospital volunteer and homemaker, died of heart disease May 3 at her Northwest Baltimore home. She was 97. Born Betty Loretta Fox in Windham County, Conn., she moved to Baltimore in 1929 and soon met her future husband, Earl Pruce, who became librarian of the old News American. Friends said Mrs. Pruce was talented in arts and crafts. Over the years she donated much of her handiwork to charitable institutions for sale in their gift shops. She was also a gift wrapper for Hutzler's department stores in the 1960s and 1970s.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1996
Goodbye, Montebello. Hello, Kernan.The William Donald Schaefer Rehabilitation Center at Kernan Hospital opened for business yesterday with about 100 patients -- including the last 60 from the Montebello Rehabilitation Hospital in Northeast Baltimore.The $30 million Schaefer Rehabilitation Center, on an 88-acre campus at the city's western edge, replaces the aging Montebello. The old hospital closed yesterday and will be converted into offices for Morgan State University.With 128 beds, the Schaefer center becomes the state's largest facility dedicated to rehabilitation, officials said.
NEWS
July 24, 2013
A recent Sun Article by Andrea Walker discussed the University of Maryland Medical Center's intention to rename Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital ("Kernan hospital changing name," July 8). James Lawrence Kernan was a Baltimore businessman who owned theaters and hotels. Mr. Kernan moved into one of his hotels and converted his mansion and estate to a hospital for children and later to include adults who required rehabilitative care. During his lifetime, Mr. Kernan watched his dream come true and the hospital become a success.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2013
Kernan Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital is changing its name to better reflect its ties to the University of Maryland Medical System. The hospital will be known as the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute effective this month. The new name is also meant to reflect its focus on innovation and research. The 144-bed hospital is the largest inpatient rehabilitation hospital and provider of rehabilitation services in the state. Patients come to the hospital after recovering from strokes, traumatic injury and other illnesses.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
City emergency management officials are working with officials at Kernan Hospital to restore water after a water main break on its Dickeyville campus cut its supply, officials said late Wednesday morning. Gaylene Adamczyk, a hospital spokeswoman, said the hospital was never fully without water and is not evacuating its patients, though emergency officials had said that was being considered. "We are maintaining our clinical operations at this time," Adamczyk said about 12:45 p.m. The orthopedics and rehabilitation hospital has 118 patients, said Ian Brennan, a Baltimore Fire spokesman.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2012
A federal court has dismissed a case against a rehabilitation hospital owned by the University of Maryland Medical System that was accused of diagnosing patients with a rare malnutrition-related disorder to collect bigger Medicare and Medicaid payments. The federal government filed a $8.1 million lawsuit in U.S. District Court against Kernan Hospital last year, saying the West Baltimore facility manipulated its computer system to show that patients suffered from kwashiorkor, a disease most typically found in impoverished regions.
NEWS
November 10, 2011
Many thanks to Jay Hancock for his interesting article about the Justice Department accusing Kernan Hospital of fraud in presenting a diagnosis of kwashiorkor in the billing for a number of patients ("Feds charge fraud in Kernan diagnoses," Nov. 8). I find it hard to believe that any medical personnel would be so stupid as to bill for patients with a wildly unlikely diagnosis of kwashiorkor. It seems more likely that a billing clerk entered an erroneous ICD (international classification of disease)
BUSINESS
Jay Hancock | November 7, 2011
It looked like a public health emergency. Hundreds of patients checking into Kernan Hospital were getting diagnosed with a severe form of malnutrition called kwashiorkor. Taking its name from a Ghanian word, kwashiorkor is typically seen in children and is marked by swollen feet, a swollen stomach and skin ulcers. It's common in Africa and developing nations elsewhere but is hardly heard of in the United States. But by 2008, according to records obtained from state regulators, the West Baltimore orthopedic hospital was diagnosing one in every eight patients with the disease that helps define famines in Somalia or Bangladesh.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | August 27, 2009
John Jerome "Jack" Tansey, a well-known Baltimore orthopedic surgeon who was also an accomplished horseman and gardener, died Monday of lung cancer at the Charlestown retirement community. He was 89. Dr. Tansey, the son of a dentist and a homemaker, was born and raised in East Hampton, Mass., and graduated in 1939 from the Williston Northampton School in his hometown. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1943 from Brown University in Providence, R.I., he graduated in 1945 from the University of Maryland School of Medicine.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
The state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene must continue to pay for care for uninsured rehabilitation patients who are now served at Kernan Hospital, Attorney General J. Joseph Curran said in an opinion.The ruling was requested after a series of changes in the way rehabilitation patients were served.The health department used to operate its own rehabilitation facility, Montebello Center. The legislature in 1992 turned Montebello over to University of Maryland Medical System (UMMS).
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2011
The federal government has filed a lawsuit against Kernan Hospital seeking $8.1 million because of what is says was improper billing to the Medicare and Medicaid system. The lawsuit filed by the Department of Health and Human Services and Department of Defense accuses the rehabilitation hospital in Baltimore of falsely manipulating its computerized billing system so that it looked like patients had a severe form of malnutrition called kwashiorkor. Hospitals are compensated more for a patient who has a more severe and complex diagnosis.
NEWS
August 26, 2010
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun Semmes Guest "Buck" Walsh, a retired Monumental Corp. executive who enjoyed singing, died Friday of a brain tumor at his Owings Mills home. He was 84. Mr. Walsh, the son of a career naval officer and a homemaker, was born and raised in Annapolis. He was a 1943 graduate of Episcopal High School in Alexandria, Va. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1946 in civil engineering from Yale University and a master's degree in business from Harvard Business School in 1950.
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