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By New York Times News Service | January 13, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- The American government took its toughest position yet on Kenya's disputed elections yesterday, calling on Kenya's president and opposition leaders to meet immediately and saying that the election was so flawed that it was impossible to know who really won. "The United States cannot conduct business as usual in Kenya," said the statement, written by Jendayi E. Frazer, assistant secretary of state for African affairs. Kenya, an American ally, receives hundreds of millions of dollars in U.S. aid each year.
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NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 10, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- As the head of the African Union met with Kenya's political rivals here yesterday to try to get them talking, opposition supporters waited tensely on the streets for news and warned of more violence if President Mwai Kibaki stays in power. John Kufuor, the AU chairman and Ghana's president, met with Kibaki and opposition leader Raila Odinga, trying to inch them toward a political resolution to end tribal violence that followed their disputed presidential contest. There was no official comment on the substance of the talks, nor any sign that the two rivals would meet face to face.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 7, 2008
NAKURU, Kenya -- Kenya's privileged tribe is on the run. During the past few days, tens of thousands of Kikuyus, the tribe of Kenya's president, have packed into heavily guarded buses to flee the western part of the country because of ethnic violence. Yesterday, endless convoys of buses - some with their windshields smashed by rocks - crawled across a landscape of scorched homes and empty farms. It is nothing short of a mass exodus. The tribe that has dominated business and politics in Kenya since independence in 1963 is being chased off its land by machete-wielding mobs made up of members of other tribes furious about the Dec. 27 election, which Kenya's president, Mwai Kibaki, won under dubious circumstances.
NEWS
By Jonathan Stevenson | January 6, 2008
Kenya has been the anchor of political stability in East Africa. But in recent days, 300 people have been killed and 100,000 have been displaced in political unrest after the re-election of President Mwai Kibaki amid widely reported voting irregularities. As America's key ally in the region, Kenya cannot be allowed to collapse. Mr. Kibaki has acquiesced to a judicial investigation of the elections, but its impartiality is open to doubt. The U.S. must warn Mr. Kibaki that unless he agrees either to a conciliatory accommodation satisfactory to the opposition or to new, legitimate elections, economic sanctions will be in the offing.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | January 6, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- At the edge of a Nairobi neighborhood called the Ghetto, there is a bridge across a gray, stinking creek, on a street called Mother Teresa Road. The creek has become a frontier between two worlds, and the bridge the border crossing. Yesterday, under the protection of paramilitary police, people shuttled from one side to another, carrying furniture, bedding, bags and pots as they steadily divided themselves by tribe. On one side of the bridge, in the Ghetto, no Luos can live.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,Los Angeles Times | January 5, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Up to 100,000 Kenyans face starvation in western Kenya because of election-related tribal violence, the World Food Program warned yesterday, as rivals in last week's disputed presidential vote showed no willingness to talk. President Mwai Kibaki and opposition candidate Raila Odinga, who had led through much of the vote-counting, continued to put up uncompromising positions: The opposition called for a new election and Kibaki agreed - if the courts ordered it. Odinga already has described the courts as packed with Kibaki's cronies.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | January 5, 2008
One talks on the phone with relatives, who describe hiding in their homes while watching mobs attack neighbors and loot houses. Another speaks of a young niece, sick with malaria, who has been unable to pass through dangerous streets to see a doctor. For native Kenyans living in Baltimore, the past few days have been filled with anxiety as they try to maintain contact with family members in their home country, where a disputed election has plunged the usually peaceful African nation into chaos.
NEWS
By Paul Salopek and Paul Salopek,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 4, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Postelection chaos swirled like a hurricane over this African capital yesterday, with a strange eye of calm reigning over an abandoned downtown while a storm of tear gas, hurled rocks and arsonists' smoke swept across the city's ring of slums. Heavily armed police blocked tens of thousands of angry marchers from attending an opposition rally in a central park, while the two leaders locked in the bitterest presidential election in Kenyan history showed no intention of negotiating their way out of a deepening political crisis that has killed at least 300 people.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 2, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Post-election riots in Kenya descended into savage tribal killings yesterday as a mob burned a church where families had taken shelter from the violence, killing at least 35 people, witnesses reported. Many of the victims were children. The burning of the church in Eldoret followed the killings overnight of 18 people in the town about 150 miles northwest of Nairobi. Some of the victims reportedly had their heads hacked off. A police officer also was killed. Witnesses reported revenge killings and pitched battles between mobs from rival tribes armed with machetes called pangas or with bows and arrows.
NEWS
By Robyn Dixon and Nicholas Soi and Robyn Dixon and Nicholas Soi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 1, 2008
NAIROBI, Kenya -- Police opened fire yesterday on rampaging opposition supporters who were burning houses and cars, looting businesses and attacking people, as the death toll in Kenya's post-election violence climbed to at least 125. In Kibera, a sprawling slum area of Nairobi, youths armed with machetes, wooden posts and iron bars tore down shacks and looted whatever was left to take, in a scene played out across the country, on the third day of opposition...
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