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By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1999
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- At the Kentucky Horse Park, Cigar is "the world's horse."That's what the narrator calls him as Cathy Roby leads the two-time Horse of the Year into the pavilion at the park's Hall of Champions, Cigar's home since May. Three times each day, Roby shows off Cigar in the small pavilion where a narrator chronicles his career while Cigar eyes his adoring fans and pricks his ears at each camera's click."
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By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
A growing number of thoroughbreds are being groomed for new roles following their days on the race track, including assignments as fox hunters, riding horses, pets and show jumpers. Maryland thoroughbred trainer Rodney Jenkins points to the intelligence of a horse as one of the reasons why the animal is able to easily make the transition into the next stage of its life. "It's really a thrilling thing to watch a horse in action," Jenkins said. "They're beautiful animals. They're not dumb.
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SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1999
For the first time in two years, Cigar is back in the public eye. The two-time Horse of the Year, born nine years ago in Maryland, walked off a van into his new home Sunday at the Kentucky Horse Park, a public facility in Lexington.Since May 1997, Cigar has resided at the private farm of an equine-reproductive specialist who attempted to reverse Cigar's infertility. After efforts failed, the insurance company that owns Cigar decided to send him to the horse park, which is open year-round to visitors.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | May 19, 2012
Horse racing 'Redux' retirement home still up in air Rapid Redux is still retired, but his retirement home has yet to be determined. On Thursday, owner Robert Cole said the horse would not race again, and trainer David Wells said Rapid Redux would be going to the Kentucky Horse Park. But Wells said Friday that he learned that the part of the Kentucky Horse Park he had been speaking to was actually the Secretariat Center, which retrains racehorses for post-racing careers.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
To the delight of his legions of fans, Cigar appears headed to the Kentucky Horse Park, a public park near Lexington that welcomes adoring visitors.For the past year and a half, Cigar has been secluded at a private farm in Kentucky where a reproductive specialist tried to determine whether the Maryland-bred, two-time Horse of the Year could ever sire offspring.The farm permitted few visitors. In fact, that was the idea: Keep Cigar out of the public eye in a quiet, natural setting so that, perhaps, his natural sexual functions would flourish.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
After six months off to recover from the wear and tear of a North American record 22 straight victories, Rapid Redux will be retired next week to Kentucky Horse Park, his owner Robert Cole and trainer David Wells said. "He's perfect right now and we want him to stay that way," said Cole, a Towson native. "Why risk having him get beat. " Located outside of Lexington, Kentucky Horse Park is home to many famous horses, including Cigar, Da Horse and Funny Cide. John Henry, who was a resident, is buried there.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | May 19, 2012
Horse racing 'Redux' retirement home still up in air Rapid Redux is still retired, but his retirement home has yet to be determined. On Thursday, owner Robert Cole said the horse would not race again, and trainer David Wells said Rapid Redux would be going to the Kentucky Horse Park. But Wells said Friday that he learned that the part of the Kentucky Horse Park he had been speaking to was actually the Secretariat Center, which retrains racehorses for post-racing careers.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1999
The headline in the weekly magazine Thoroughbred Times read: "Plans set for Cigar's retirement." The response from London: "Oh, no, they're not."Ever since reporting Nov. 22 that Cigar was likely headed to the Kentucky Horse Park, a tourist attraction near Lexington, Ky., I have telephoned London weekly, seeking confirmation of plans for the Maryland-bred two-time Horse of the Year. Spokesmen there for Assicurazioni Generali SpA have said repeatedly that a plan to move Cigar to the Kentucky Horse Park awaits final approval from Generali executives.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
Gunfire. Skullduggery. Bones in the attic. The story behind the story of the Preakness trophy reads like a great Southern novel. The Woodlawn Vase has its roots in pre-Civil War Kentucky. It was even buried there to keep it from falling into the wrong hands by a horse breeder who once got into a gunfight with the owner of a racetrack, shot the man and was banished from all tracks in America — you could look it up in The New York Times of 1879. The breeder, Capt. Thomas Moore, whose horses won the Tiffany-crafted, sterling silver trophy in 1861 and 1862, interred it for fear it would be melted down for shot, the popular story goes.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 11, 1994
Q: I am a college student planning to travel in Western Europe in the spring for about two months, primarily by train. Does it provide for people who have a bicycle?A: Since the Rail Europe system serves 17 countries and each is free to impose its own regulations, there's no simple answer. But if there are two rules to remember, they are: (1) Check ahead to find out whether the train you plan to take can accommodate bicycles, and (2) Check in early.Here's a sampling of the policies of some Eurail members, with a phone number listed for railroads that can provide details on this side of the Atlantic.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
After six months off to recover from the wear and tear of a North American record 22 straight victories, Rapid Redux will be retired next week to Kentucky Horse Park, his owner Robert Cole and trainer David Wells said. "He's perfect right now and we want him to stay that way," said Cole, a Towson native. "Why risk having him get beat. " Located outside of Lexington, Kentucky Horse Park is home to many famous horses, including Cigar, Da Horse and Funny Cide. John Henry, who was a resident, is buried there.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
Gunfire. Skullduggery. Bones in the attic. The story behind the story of the Preakness trophy reads like a great Southern novel. The Woodlawn Vase has its roots in pre-Civil War Kentucky. It was even buried there to keep it from falling into the wrong hands by a horse breeder who once got into a gunfight with the owner of a racetrack, shot the man and was banished from all tracks in America — you could look it up in The New York Times of 1879. The breeder, Capt. Thomas Moore, whose horses won the Tiffany-crafted, sterling silver trophy in 1861 and 1862, interred it for fear it would be melted down for shot, the popular story goes.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 7, 1999
LEXINGTON, Ky. -- At the Kentucky Horse Park, Cigar is "the world's horse."That's what the narrator calls him as Cathy Roby leads the two-time Horse of the Year into the pavilion at the park's Hall of Champions, Cigar's home since May. Three times each day, Roby shows off Cigar in the small pavilion where a narrator chronicles his career while Cigar eyes his adoring fans and pricks his ears at each camera's click."
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1999
For the first time in two years, Cigar is back in the public eye. The two-time Horse of the Year, born nine years ago in Maryland, walked off a van into his new home Sunday at the Kentucky Horse Park, a public facility in Lexington.Since May 1997, Cigar has resided at the private farm of an equine-reproductive specialist who attempted to reverse Cigar's infertility. After efforts failed, the insurance company that owns Cigar decided to send him to the horse park, which is open year-round to visitors.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | January 3, 1999
The headline in the weekly magazine Thoroughbred Times read: "Plans set for Cigar's retirement." The response from London: "Oh, no, they're not."Ever since reporting Nov. 22 that Cigar was likely headed to the Kentucky Horse Park, a tourist attraction near Lexington, Ky., I have telephoned London weekly, seeking confirmation of plans for the Maryland-bred two-time Horse of the Year. Spokesmen there for Assicurazioni Generali SpA have said repeatedly that a plan to move Cigar to the Kentucky Horse Park awaits final approval from Generali executives.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | November 22, 1998
To the delight of his legions of fans, Cigar appears headed to the Kentucky Horse Park, a public park near Lexington that welcomes adoring visitors.For the past year and a half, Cigar has been secluded at a private farm in Kentucky where a reproductive specialist tried to determine whether the Maryland-bred, two-time Horse of the Year could ever sire offspring.The farm permitted few visitors. In fact, that was the idea: Keep Cigar out of the public eye in a quiet, natural setting so that, perhaps, his natural sexual functions would flourish.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2012
A growing number of thoroughbreds are being groomed for new roles following their days on the race track, including assignments as fox hunters, riding horses, pets and show jumpers. Maryland thoroughbred trainer Rodney Jenkins points to the intelligence of a horse as one of the reasons why the animal is able to easily make the transition into the next stage of its life. "It's really a thrilling thing to watch a horse in action," Jenkins said. "They're beautiful animals. They're not dumb.
NEWS
By Muphen Whitney and Muphen Whitney,Contributing Writer | September 2, 1992
Taylorsville's Kelly Conaway says that the toughest thing about being on the team that won the gold medal in the junior games competition at the 1992 United States Pony Club National Festival wasn't the long trip to Kentucky or riding in five competitive sessions in three days.It wasn't having to be at the barn at 6 a.m., or spending hours each day vaulting onto ponies and racing around in various games at the Kentucky Horse Park.The toughest thing, says this veteran games competitor, was having to listen to her brother.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | December 11, 1994
Q: I am a college student planning to travel in Western Europe in the spring for about two months, primarily by train. Does it provide for people who have a bicycle?A: Since the Rail Europe system serves 17 countries and each is free to impose its own regulations, there's no simple answer. But if there are two rules to remember, they are: (1) Check ahead to find out whether the train you plan to take can accommodate bicycles, and (2) Check in early.Here's a sampling of the policies of some Eurail members, with a phone number listed for railroads that can provide details on this side of the Atlantic.
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