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NEWS
December 28, 1990
With the high-span bridge across the Kent Narrows open to two-way traffic, Marylanders can say goodbye to one of the major headaches on the way to Ocean City. The span arches 3,000 feet and replaces the old drawbridge that had created horrendous summertime back-ups.The tall bridge is providing other benefits for Eastern Shore residents. Many Route 50 merchants noted a rise in Christmas shoppers. And it makes jobs on the Western Shore more appealing.We hope that does not set off a further rush for residential development on the Shore.
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FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
On Maryland's Eastern Shore, 6201 Swan Creek Road in Rock Hall reaches new heights in property ownership. A classic 19th-century farmhouse and a charming waterfront cottage sit on a private peninsula consisting of 177-plus acres of farmland. With gorgeous views of the Chesapeake Bay, the main farmhouse has been meticulously restored by the owner from the foundation up - including a major addition completed in 1998 that nearly doubles the living space. This has allowed for a modern kitchen, family room, guest room and an office.
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NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
An Eastern Shore man is dead and two people remained hospitalized after their small boat hit the south jetty at Kent Narrows late Sunday, police said. The body of David R. Whitlow, 43, was recovered at 12:30 p.m. Monday by a team from Charles County Dive Rescue, Maryland Natural Resources Police Lt. A.A. Windemuth said. Whitlow, of Hebron in Wicomico County, was thrown from the 21-foot-Boston Whaler when it hit the concrete jetty at about 11 p.m. Sunday, Windemuth said. He was one of four people on board for the trip from Annapolis to Kent Narrows, Windemuth said.
NEWS
October 4, 2013
Sunday, Oct. 6 First Sunday Arts Festival The season's final outdoor event being held from noon to 5 p.m. in the first block of West Street and Calvert Street in Annapolis features crafts, artists, music, street performers and sidewalk dining. Among the performers are the Basement Band, Children's Theatre of Annapolis and the Annapolis Dixieland Band. Free. Information: 410-741-3267. Monday, Oct. 7 Photo club The Digital Photography Club of Annapolis meets at 7 p.m. at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St. in Annapolis.
BUSINESS
By Pat Emory and Pat Emory,Special to The Sun | December 9, 1990
KENT NARROWS -- When Oyster Cove Limited Partnership started construction on its waterfront community at the Kent Narrows in the mid-'80s, it billed itself as "a pearl on the Shore."Pastel-blue condominiums reflected in a pool of still water came with boat slips at your doorstep, swimming pool, lighted tennis courts, and a picturesque, cabana-style clubhouse -- everything you needed to enjoy a leisurely weekend in the country.But outside this opulent property with its promise of around-the-clock security, would-be buyers found a whole different world.
SPORTS
By Brian Fishman and Brian Fishman,Staff Writer | August 6, 1993
The calls come from places such as Montana and Quebec.Larry Lauterbach encourages his clients to phone any time and from anywhere. Perhaps they are wondering about his latest hydroplane model. They may be in need of proper instructions for repairing a Lauterbach-built boat or calling for advice on increasing the hydroplane's speed.Lauterbach, of Chester, Md., is an expert hydroplane designer. His father, Henry, started the family business in 1947. Since then, Lauterbach Custom Boats has become one of the world's primary manufacturers, having built 250 hydroplanes.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
William H. Harris, a Kent Island waterman known as Captain Bill who established an oyster and crab business, died of cancer Tuesday at his Chester home. He was 83. Born in Queen Anne's County, the son of an Eastern Shore waterman, he attended elementary schools in Chester and Stevensville until the eighth grade. At age 14, he began oystering, clamming and crabbing on his own. During World War II he served in an Army artillery unit in the Pacific. After the war he returned to Chester and continued work on the water and also briefly ran a general store.
NEWS
By Doug Birch and Doug Birch,Sun Staff Correspondent | November 29, 1990
KENT ISLAND -- The old Kent Narrows drawbridge, the cause of epic bottlenecks and roadside picnics for two generations of beach-bound motorists, is to become a quaint landmark today as a massive new bridge 100 yards north fully opens for traffic.State transportation officials and area politicians gathered in the morning mist near the crest of the new 3,000-foot-long, six-lane concrete span and cut the ribbon on the eastbound lanes yesterday, 18 months after construction began and several weeks after the westbound lanes opened.
SPORTS
By Pat Emory and Pat Emory,Special to The Sun | July 26, 1991
KENT NARROWS -- Some of the fastest boats in the mid-Atlantic states will top 100 mph this weekend in two racing events held as part of the the 1991 Kent Narrows Power Boat Challenge.Tomorrow morning, 50 off-shore racing boats are expected to open throttle on an oblong course north of Kent Narrows on the Chester River, reaching speeds of up to 115 mph and covering 45 miles in less than an hour.Tomorrow and Sunday afternoons, hydroplanes will fly above the surface of the water in Hog Bay, south of Kent Narrows, at speeds of 85 to 140 mph.Members of the Kent Narrows Racing Association, which organized the racing, say this may be the first time an event has featured two different types of high-speed boat racing that require entirely different types of racing conditions.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1999
CHESTER -- On any given day at Kent Narrows, a few miles east of the Bay Bridge, the smells of crab cakes blend with diesel fumes and the sounds of herons and gulls mix with the whine of power tools and the rumble of traffic headed elsewhere on Route 50.The Narrows is a traditional maritime center, where stained workboats from a small commercial harbor and polished mega-yachts from several big marinas share a busy channel connecting the Chester River and...
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2012
An Eastern Shore man is dead and two people remained hospitalized after their small boat hit the south jetty at Kent Narrows late Sunday, police said. The body of David R. Whitlow, 43, was recovered at 12:30 p.m. Monday by a team from Charles County Dive Rescue, Maryland Natural Resources Police Lt. A.A. Windemuth said. Whitlow, of Hebron in Wicomico County, was thrown from the 21-foot-Boston Whaler when it hit the concrete jetty at about 11 p.m. Sunday, Windemuth said. He was one of four people on board for the trip from Annapolis to Kent Narrows, Windemuth said.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | June 24, 2011
The last Saturday in June was the day we said goodbye to Baltimore and packed it up for the summer. As a child, it was a day I anticipated all year, then remembered for its unforgettable set of rituals. By the end of June the pace of our domestic life was slowing. The heat had set in, and, as a neighbor once observed, there was never an electric fan in our home. Baltimore was just different in the summer. The downtown department stores closed at noon on Saturdays. As you walked the streets you heard Orioles games on radios through all the open windows.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2011
— For watermen who require safe passage to Chesapeake Bay oyster bars and fishing grounds each winter, the appearance of one of the state's four ice-breaking ships means money in the bank. Like giant plows on an asphalt road, icebreakers have been carving channels from piers to open waters, clearing away dangerous sheets of ice that can idle the commercial fleet, or worse, punch through the hull of a fishing boat. "Any ice at all is a real hazard for them," Capt. Shawn Orr said Tuesday morning as he guided the 80-foot M/V Sandusky through a row of watermen's boats tied up at Kent Narrows.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | February 25, 2006
William H. Harris, a Kent Island waterman known as Captain Bill who established an oyster and crab business, died of cancer Tuesday at his Chester home. He was 83. Born in Queen Anne's County, the son of an Eastern Shore waterman, he attended elementary schools in Chester and Stevensville until the eighth grade. At age 14, he began oystering, clamming and crabbing on his own. During World War II he served in an Army artillery unit in the Pacific. After the war he returned to Chester and continued work on the water and also briefly ran a general store.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2004
KENT NARROWS - It's been years since Ronnie Benton has seen oysters like these: plump clusters of fat shells covered in mud and mussels, plucked right from local waters. "They were beautiful, beautiful," said Benton, a Centreville oysterman and diver who spent much of yesterday morning about 20 feet underwater as he combed Blunts Bar for his boat's 30-bushel catch. "It's just beautiful down there." Yesterday marked the first opening of Maryland's managed reserves system, a unique partnership among watermen, scientists and regulators to grow oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. In recent years, oystermen have all but lost their livelihood to diseases and over-harvesting.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2004
KENT NARROWS - On the surface, the stretch of water between the two white buoys where the Chester River meets the Chesapeake Bay looks unremarkable. But when the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel Bay Commitment lowers a sonar device, a different picture emerges. There are oysters there - millions of them. And at month's end, oystermen who all but lost their livelihoods to overharvesting and disease will again have a crop to sell from the area known as Blunts Bar. While Maryland's Department of Natural Resources is investigating whether to introduce a non-native species to the Chesapeake, scientists in Maryland and Virginia are striving to bring back a sustainable population of native oysters.
BUSINESS
December 26, 1994
The following are recent bankruptcy filings in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Eastern District of Maryland in Baltimore City:Dec. 15* EWH & Associates, d/b/a Kent Narrows Factory Stores, Kent Narrows, filed for Chapter 11. Principals: Jonathan S. Shaftmaster, Clive W. Wang, Roger A. Healey. Assets: Over $1 million; liabilities: Over $1 million.Dec. 16* Talk's Enterprises, 1313 E. Pratt St., a bar, filed for Chapter 11. Assets: $115,000; liabilities: $100,000.Dec. 19* United Tire Wholesale Inc., 22 Lee St., Annapolis, filed for Chapter 11. Assets: $13,935; liabilities: $153,749.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker | July 30, 1998
Midsummer power boat racing continues on the Chesapeake on Saturday and Sunday with Thunder on the Narrows, an APBA-sanctioned hydroplane event that each year draws a strong field.Among the Maryland drivers at the top of their class and expected to compete are Ken McMullen of Arnold in the 1.5-liter class and Alicia Cheezum of Centerville in 5-liter.Racing classes include 1.5-liter, 2.5-liter stock, 2.5-liter modified and 5-liter, as well as Jersey Speed Skiff, Super Stock and Pro Stock.The competition is sponsored by the Kent Narrows Racing Association.
FEATURES
By Anne Tyler | August 3, 2004
As visitors descend on Baltimore during the summer tourism season, staff writer Larry Bingham offers an occasional look at how the city has been portrayed by writers over the years. Today, an excerpt from Anne Tyler's novel Ladder of Years, copyright1995, originally published by Alfred A. Knopf. Pulitzer Prize-winning Tyler lives in the city and sets many of her novels here. "The passing houses looked arbitrarily plunked down, like Monopoly houses. The smaller the house, it seemed, the more birdbaths and plaster deer in the yard, the tidier the flower beds, the larger the dish antenna out back.
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