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NEWS
September 7, 1997
They wanted to say goodbye to someone they felt they knew.Thousands of people left messages and a field of flowers at Kensington Palace, Princess Diana's London home; stood in line for hours to sign a book of condolences at St. James's Palace, where her body lay before the funeral; performed the equivalent task by signing a guest book on the Internet; or wrote a few brief words at British embassies and consulates around the world.One wreath of white flowers outside the consulate in New York stood 7 feet high.
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TRAVEL
April 1, 2007
LONDON THE KNOT GUIDE TO DESTINATION WEDDINGS Clarkson Potter / $19.95 Thinking about getting married on a distant beach? A new guide answers your questions about planning. The Knot Guide to Destination Weddings details more than 200 locations for weddings, from Hawaii to Mexico, with tips from experts and lessons from couples who have been through it. Carley Roney and destination wedding expert JoAnn Gregoli break down the process of planning from afar, from etiquette to local laws.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 1, 1997
LONDON -- Dawn had not yet broken yesterday when Ian Leckie showed up at the gates of Kensington Palace, bearing a solitary bunch of lilies and a nation's grief at the death of Britain's Princess Diana."
NEWS
By Al Webb | November 13, 2002
LONDON - The usual image of a butler is of a taciturn gent who irons the Sunday newspaper, serves up the sherry and otherwise keeps up with family goings-on with an eye firmly glued to the keyhole. And there's the odd one into whose ear a queen whispers dire warnings of dark forces abroad in the land. But then, Paul Burrell is not your run-of-the-mill Jeeves. In addition to serving up one lump or two at afternoon tea, his duties as butler to Princess Diana ranged from smuggling her lovers into the palace in the trunk of his car to helping her hand out the equivalent of $75 at a time to railway station prostitutes.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 10, 2002
LONDON - Britain's Princess Margaret, who died "peacefully in her sleep" yesterday at age 71, was the princess who loved and lived unhappily ever after. She remained in the shadow of her older sister, Queen Elizabeth II, traded youthful love for duty after severing a 1950s romance with a dashing yet divorced royal aide and later endured a failed marriage. In her youth, she was lively, gorgeous and brazenly independent. But after years of smoking cigarettes, she grew increasingly frail, undergoing lung surgery in 1985, suffering a mild stroke in 1998 and another stroke last year.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 4, 1997
LONDON -- Acting in the face of harsh criticism from the British press and public, the royal family made its first public comment yesterday on the outpouring of grief over the death of Princess Diana and announced that the route of her funeral procession Saturday would be much longer than originally planned so more people could witness the event."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 13, 1996
LONDON -- She'll still be rich and famous, but she'll no longer be called Her Royal Highness.Princess Diana took the money, the apartment and the access to her kids but gave up her royal title in a divorce deal with Prince Charles that was announced yesterday.Formal divorce proceedings begin Monday, with the 15-year marriage due to officially end by Aug. 28, without either having to appear in court.The announcement was made by the couple's lawyers: Farrer and Co. on behalf of Charles, and Mishcon de Reya on behalf of Diana.
NEWS
By Al Webb | November 13, 2002
LONDON - The usual image of a butler is of a taciturn gent who irons the Sunday newspaper, serves up the sherry and otherwise keeps up with family goings-on with an eye firmly glued to the keyhole. And there's the odd one into whose ear a queen whispers dire warnings of dark forces abroad in the land. But then, Paul Burrell is not your run-of-the-mill Jeeves. In addition to serving up one lump or two at afternoon tea, his duties as butler to Princess Diana ranged from smuggling her lovers into the palace in the trunk of his car to helping her hand out the equivalent of $75 at a time to railway station prostitutes.
NEWS
September 7, 1997
Princess Diana was the hostess.Yes, the princess would see me - at 11 a.m. sharp, the fax specified. She was at home - at Kensington Palace - relaxed, independent. It was probably the only place where she didn't risk being targeted by camera zooms.She was wearing a short, sleeveless dress, matching her eyes, unless they were reflecting its color. She wore a necklace of large pearls, high heels and a quiet assurance demonstrated by her smile and her friendly way of proffering her hand. Above all, she seemed free, and her simplicity was a nice surprise coming from someone whom protocol dictates should be addressed as "Ma'am."
TRAVEL
April 1, 2007
LONDON THE KNOT GUIDE TO DESTINATION WEDDINGS Clarkson Potter / $19.95 Thinking about getting married on a distant beach? A new guide answers your questions about planning. The Knot Guide to Destination Weddings details more than 200 locations for weddings, from Hawaii to Mexico, with tips from experts and lessons from couples who have been through it. Carley Roney and destination wedding expert JoAnn Gregoli break down the process of planning from afar, from etiquette to local laws.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 10, 2002
LONDON - Britain's Princess Margaret, who died "peacefully in her sleep" yesterday at age 71, was the princess who loved and lived unhappily ever after. She remained in the shadow of her older sister, Queen Elizabeth II, traded youthful love for duty after severing a 1950s romance with a dashing yet divorced royal aide and later endured a failed marriage. In her youth, she was lively, gorgeous and brazenly independent. But after years of smoking cigarettes, she grew increasingly frail, undergoing lung surgery in 1985, suffering a mild stroke in 1998 and another stroke last year.
NEWS
September 7, 1997
Princess Diana was the hostess.Yes, the princess would see me - at 11 a.m. sharp, the fax specified. She was at home - at Kensington Palace - relaxed, independent. It was probably the only place where she didn't risk being targeted by camera zooms.She was wearing a short, sleeveless dress, matching her eyes, unless they were reflecting its color. She wore a necklace of large pearls, high heels and a quiet assurance demonstrated by her smile and her friendly way of proffering her hand. Above all, she seemed free, and her simplicity was a nice surprise coming from someone whom protocol dictates should be addressed as "Ma'am."
NEWS
September 7, 1997
They wanted to say goodbye to someone they felt they knew.Thousands of people left messages and a field of flowers at Kensington Palace, Princess Diana's London home; stood in line for hours to sign a book of condolences at St. James's Palace, where her body lay before the funeral; performed the equivalent task by signing a guest book on the Internet; or wrote a few brief words at British embassies and consulates around the world.One wreath of white flowers outside the consulate in New York stood 7 feet high.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 4, 1997
LONDON -- Acting in the face of harsh criticism from the British press and public, the royal family made its first public comment yesterday on the outpouring of grief over the death of Princess Diana and announced that the route of her funeral procession Saturday would be much longer than originally planned so more people could witness the event."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 1, 1997
LONDON -- Dawn had not yet broken yesterday when Ian Leckie showed up at the gates of Kensington Palace, bearing a solitary bunch of lilies and a nation's grief at the death of Britain's Princess Diana."
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 13, 1996
LONDON -- She'll still be rich and famous, but she'll no longer be called Her Royal Highness.Princess Diana took the money, the apartment and the access to her kids but gave up her royal title in a divorce deal with Prince Charles that was announced yesterday.Formal divorce proceedings begin Monday, with the 15-year marriage due to officially end by Aug. 28, without either having to appear in court.The announcement was made by the couple's lawyers: Farrer and Co. on behalf of Charles, and Mishcon de Reya on behalf of Diana.
NEWS
July 28, 1994
Prudent governments will take urgent preventive measures against terrorism wherever there are convenient Jewish targets.What appears to be a worldwide bombing campaign, protesting the increase in recognition of Israel by Arab governments, is in practical consequences classical anti-Semitic violence. The targeting has nothing to do with Arab regimes whose policies offend the bombers. And it has less to do with Israel than with Jews.The outbreak may be coincidence, or something more. Four acts of terror -- in Argentina, Panama and Britain -- coincided with the rapprochement of Israel and Jordan.
TRAVEL
By McClatchy-Tribune | October 26, 2008
We're thinking of going to London and Paris from Dec. 21 to Jan. 2. Are there seasonal limitations that would keep us from visiting major sites and attractions? Both cities can be lovely to visit in winter. The cold weather can be bracing when you are spending hours tramping around, and there's certainly no shortage of indoor must-sees in these capitals of art and culture. Plus, there will be holiday lights, trees and events galore. Here are details on what's open and what's closed from Visit Britain and Maison de la France, the official tourism agencies: LONDON Sights: : The London Eye will be closed on Dec. 25 only.
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