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By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
Keno may be legal, but that doesn't make it right, Maryland' attorney general stated emphatically yesterday."Keno is a serious policy mistake," said Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., the latest in an expanding list of public officials who have voiced concern over or opposition to the new budget-balancing gambling game the Schaefer administration intends to begin early next month.Also yesterday:* Sen. John A. Cade, an Anne Arundel County Republican and influential member of the Senate's Budget and Taxation Committee, called the new game "worse than slot machine gambling," said such expansion of state-sanctioned gambling was "totally inappropriate" without legislative consultation and vowed to try to stop funding for it in the coming year's budget.
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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | October 6, 1993
More than 1,200 lottery terminals worth nearly $10 million are sitting unused in a Howard County warehouse largely because state lottery officials overestimated the market for Maryland's flashy new keno game.The state has already paid GTECH Corp., Maryland's primary lottery vendor, $5.6 million for 750 of the machines and has agreed to pay an additional $3.9 million for the remaining 523 next March.Financing is to be spread over five years, which means in the coming year, taxpayers will pay at least $225,000 in interest alone for equipment that may gather dust for months.
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NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | December 20, 1992
If William Donald Schaefer had his way, Maryland not only would be on the verge of plunging into keno, but also video draw poker, blackjack and bingo. The modern-day equivalent of the one-armed bandit would be back in business at 600 locations on January 4, at 1,800 locations by July and 4,000 locations in 1994.We're talking big-time gambling.Clearly, the governor has been bitten by the gambling bug. He loves to play the lottery. Always has. He's been pressing lottery officials to expand their games of chance ever since he took office.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
A state Senate committee voted yesterday to kill keno, the controversial electronic lottery game.But while lawmakers were predicting that the full Senate also would vote to get rid of the game, they continued to doubt that the House of Delegates would agree.By an 8-2 vote, the Senate Finance Committee approved a bill yesterday that would prevent the State Lottery Agency from installing any new keno terminals after June 1 and would require it to end the game outright by Dec. 31 of this year.
NEWS
December 21, 1992
Ocean City Mayor Roland "Fish" Powell is absolutely accurate in his assessment of the damage that legalized keno could do to his Atlantic Coast resort community. With a new keno game broadcast every five minutes, 18 hours a day, the vacation town could quickly turn into a gambling town. Ocean City's family image would be ruined.When fraternal organizations on the Eastern Shore persuaded the legislature and Gov. William Donald Schaefer to sanction limited slot-machine gambling in their establishments, Mayor Powell and officials of Worcester County succeeded in gaining an exemption.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | September 18, 1992
The Oregon electronic keno game that may be a model for Maryland's new Quick Draw lottery is a roaring financial success that, only a year after its inception, accounts for fully one-third of that state's lottery sales.But while Maryland Lottery officials say Quick Draw will tap into a new market of white-collar, professional, "twenty-something" players, Oregon's game has been most popular with young, male blue-collar workers who are less educated than the average lottery player.Maryland Lottery officials say the Quick Draw game, presented yesterday by Gov. William Donald Schaefer as a way to raise $50 million to help balance the state budget, is still on the drawing boards and won't necessarily resemble existing games.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and John W. Frece and C. Fraser Smith and John W. Frece,Staff Writers | December 11, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday defended the state' controversial venture into keno gambling, calling it the only way to balance the budget at this time.Mr. Schaefer spoke on the same day that estimates were released showing tax receipts in Maryland moving up slightly for the first time in two years. This should mean that no further budget cutting will be needed in this fiscal year, which ends June 30, state officials said. But the additional income will not be enough or come soon enough to offset the need for gambling revenue.
NEWS
By WILLIAM DONALD SCHAEFER | December 13, 1992
Long on criticism, short on solutions -- that characterize recent coverage and comments on the new lottery game that will help close a $450 million budget shortfall.For weeks I have read The Sun's unsubstantiated allegations suggesting the state skirted procurement laws in expanding the lottery contract to introduce the keno game. It's also been enlightening to hear criticism of Maryland's reliance on the lottery as a revenue source -- especially from officials who constantly appeal to the state for more money.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | December 27, 1992
Before we ring out the old year, there's still time to return once again to that hot state political topic of the last month: keno.This controversy has already generated winners and losers. Whatever New Year resolutions emerge could be determined by the state and federal courts and the United States attorney for Maryland.The biggest loser from the keno contretemps has been Attorney General J. Joseph Curran. He has come off looking like a hypocrite -- he's both for keno and against it, depending on which hat he's wearing.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | December 6, 1992
It's the mother of all payoffs; the largest of wins; the biggest lottery jackpot ever in Maryland.The winner? GTECH of Rhode Island. Thanks to a friendly governor, a friendly budget director and influential lobbyists, GTECH has parlayed a loss-leader computer contract with the Maryland Lottery Agency into a monster pay day.We're talking megabucks. GTECH is being paid an extra $49.2 million for computers and software to operate an electronic keno game in Maryland. When the original $64.6 million deal was signed in 1991, after a bitter brawl with Control Data Corp.
NEWS
February 1, 1993
Keno's Odds and OdditiesHaving taught and lectured on the mathematics of gambling for the past 20 years in Baltimore, I couldn't resist checking out the new Maryland keno game at a local pub.What I found was not quite what I had expected -- and it was obvious that the state lottery officials did not consult a mathematician for advice.The first thing that struck me as odd was the incorrect usage of the concept of odds on the game sheet. Odds and probability are related but are not equivalent.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 15, 1993
TRENTON, N.J. -- Hoping to realize $100 million more annually in lottery revenue, New Jersey is following in Maryland's footsteps with the addition of computerized keno to its assortment of numbers games.Starting in the spring, keno will be available in 200 to 300 establishments such as restaurants, taverns and convenience stores in eight counties, said Eugene McNany, chairman of the state Lottery Commission. If this trial run is successful, he said yesterday, the game could be expanded to as many as 2,200 agents in all 21 counties.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | December 27, 1992
Before we ring out the old year, there's still time to return once again to that hot state political topic of the last month: keno.This controversy has already generated winners and losers. Whatever New Year resolutions emerge could be determined by the state and federal courts and the United States attorney for Maryland.The biggest loser from the keno contretemps has been Attorney General J. Joseph Curran. He has come off looking like a hypocrite -- he's both for keno and against it, depending on which hat he's wearing.
NEWS
December 21, 1992
Ocean City Mayor Roland "Fish" Powell is absolutely accurate in his assessment of the damage that legalized keno could do to his Atlantic Coast resort community. With a new keno game broadcast every five minutes, 18 hours a day, the vacation town could quickly turn into a gambling town. Ocean City's family image would be ruined.When fraternal organizations on the Eastern Shore persuaded the legislature and Gov. William Donald Schaefer to sanction limited slot-machine gambling in their establishments, Mayor Powell and officials of Worcester County succeeded in gaining an exemption.
NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | December 20, 1992
If William Donald Schaefer had his way, Maryland not only would be on the verge of plunging into keno, but also video draw poker, blackjack and bingo. The modern-day equivalent of the one-armed bandit would be back in business at 600 locations on January 4, at 1,800 locations by July and 4,000 locations in 1994.We're talking big-time gambling.Clearly, the governor has been bitten by the gambling bug. He loves to play the lottery. Always has. He's been pressing lottery officials to expand their games of chance ever since he took office.
NEWS
By WILLIAM DONALD SCHAEFER | December 13, 1992
Long on criticism, short on solutions -- that characterize recent coverage and comments on the new lottery game that will help close a $450 million budget shortfall.For weeks I have read The Sun's unsubstantiated allegations suggesting the state skirted procurement laws in expanding the lottery contract to introduce the keno game. It's also been enlightening to hear criticism of Maryland's reliance on the lottery as a revenue source -- especially from officials who constantly appeal to the state for more money.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | October 6, 1993
More than 1,200 lottery terminals worth nearly $10 million are sitting unused in a Howard County warehouse largely because state lottery officials overestimated the market for Maryland's flashy new keno game.The state has already paid GTECH Corp., Maryland's primary lottery vendor, $5.6 million for 750 of the machines and has agreed to pay an additional $3.9 million for the remaining 523 next March.Financing is to be spread over five years, which means in the coming year, taxpayers will pay at least $225,000 in interest alone for equipment that may gather dust for months.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Staff Writer Reporters Liz Atwood, Joan Barnes, Donna Boller, Larry Carson, John W. Frece, Marina Sarris, Jackie Powder, Meredith Schlow and William Thompson contributed to this article | December 6, 1992
Maryland's new keno game is being ballyhooed as a source o $100 million a year for the state's empty pockets. But that hasn't silenced a chorus of leaders who say expanded gambling is no way to bring in badly needed cash.The state's lieutenant governor and the mayors of Baltimore and Ocean City are among those who voiced concern last week about keno, which starts Jan. 4.Gov. William Donald Schaefer hopes the game will help balance the state's budget by offering bar and restaurant customers a new numbers game every five minutes, from 6 a.m. till midnight, seven days a week.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and John W. Frece and C. Fraser Smith and John W. Frece,Staff Writers | December 11, 1992
Gov. William Donald Schaefer yesterday defended the state' controversial venture into keno gambling, calling it the only way to balance the budget at this time.Mr. Schaefer spoke on the same day that estimates were released showing tax receipts in Maryland moving up slightly for the first time in two years. This should mean that no further budget cutting will be needed in this fiscal year, which ends June 30, state officials said. But the additional income will not be enough or come soon enough to offset the need for gambling revenue.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | December 10, 1992
Keno may be legal, but that doesn't make it right, Maryland' attorney general stated emphatically yesterday."Keno is a serious policy mistake," said Attorney General J. Joseph Curran Jr., the latest in an expanding list of public officials who have voiced concern over or opposition to the new budget-balancing gambling game the Schaefer administration intends to begin early next month.Also yesterday:* Sen. John A. Cade, an Anne Arundel County Republican and influential member of the Senate's Budget and Taxation Committee, called the new game "worse than slot machine gambling," said such expansion of state-sanctioned gambling was "totally inappropriate" without legislative consultation and vowed to try to stop funding for it in the coming year's budget.
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