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NEWS
September 6, 2002
Joan G. Miller, who formerly owned a Woodlawn kennel, died Saturday of a neurological disease, progressive supranuclear palsy, at the Jewish Convalescent and Nursing Home in Pikesville. She was 74. Until she gave up her business about 25 years ago, she bred and groomed cocker spaniels, poodles, Yorkshire terriers and chihuahuas at JoJax Kennels on Dogwood Road, a business she owned and operated with her husband, Jerome "Jack" Miller, whom she married in 1947. He died in 1999. Family members said her dogs won awards at the Westminster Kennel Club shows in New York, among other competitions.
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NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2002
The foxhounds at Carrollton Hounds Kennels know who Dr. Ann Schneider and her assistant Tristin Buckstad are and what they're there for. Still, the hounds' baying at the visitors can be heard some distance away until Bob Shirley, a hunt master, arrives and quiets them. Once quiet, 11 hounds are chosen, one by one, to donate blood to Schneider's Eastern Veterinary Blood Bank for canines. Schneider, a veterinarian who operates the canine blood bank in Annapolis, spent a day three weeks ago making her monthly trip to the Carrollton Hounds Kennels outside Hampstead to draw blood from a group of the club's 39 hounds.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2002
The foxhounds at Carrollton Hounds Kennels know who Dr. Ann Schneider and her assistant Tristin Buckstad are and what they're there for. Still, the hounds' baying at the visitors can be heard some distance away until Bob Shirley, a hunt master, arrives and quiets them. Once quiet, 11 hounds are chosen, one by one, to donate blood to Schneider's Eastern Veterinary Blood Bank for canines. Schneider, a veterinarian who operates the canine blood bank in Annapolis, spent a day three weeks ago making her monthly trip to the Carrollton Hounds Kennels outside Hampstead to draw blood from a group of the club's 39 hounds.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and By Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | October 17, 2001
A mother and daughter hoping to build a kennel in a Green Spring Valley residential area dropped their challenge yesterday to a Baltimore County ruling that would have blocked one of two plans they have put forward. But Gretel White and her daughter, Erika Lanasa, who want to build a kennel for 50 dogs and 50 cats on their 6-acre property in the 7800 block of Greenspring Ave., said they will pursue another option, despite neighborhood opposition. Last summer, Deputy Zoning Administrator Timothy M. Kotroco ruled against giving White and Lanasa permission to build a kennel within 200 feet of their property line, abutting the Baltimore Beltway.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | August 10, 2001
A decision by a Baltimore County zoning official allowing construction of a kennel in an exclusive Green Spring Valley neighborhood has the property owner and project opponents claiming victory. Deputy Zoning Commissioner Timothy M. Kotroco ruled this week that Greta White and her daughter, Erika Lanasa, can build a kennel on their 6-acre property in the 7800 block of Greenspring Ave., just north of a Baltimore Beltway exit ramp. But Kotroco also said the kennel and its parking lot must fit on a 1,700-square-foot triangle of land on the property.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 10, 2001
Howard County Sheriff Chuck Cave has announced a donation of $5,000 to the Sheriff's K-9 Unit by Milk-Bone and Giant Food. A ceremony was held yesterday at Giant Food, 4715 Dorsey Hall Drive, Ellicott City. The money will be used to build a new kennel and a run area in the county government complex in Ellicott City for Bullet, the sheriff's dog for explosives cases. The dog and his handler, Deputy Don Chase, respond to calls about suspicious packages and suspected bombs. Bullet and Chase completed 16 weeks of training at the Baltimore County K9 Training Center to receive Maryland bomb-detection certification, and they continue to train for 16 hours a month.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2001
Driving along Greenspring Avenue, just north of the Baltimore Beltway, can be visually jarring these days. Two bright yellow signs blare a terse message to motorists passing through the neighborhood of $300,000 houses nestled on heavily wooded lots at the entrance to Green Spring Valley. "Stop the kennel," says one. "Protect our environment and property values," reads the other. The signs were erected by residents who oppose a plan by Greta White and her daughter Erika Lanasa to build a kennel for 50 dogs and 50 cats on their property in the 7800 block of Greenspring Ave. "Once a commercial establishment comes in, you have an epidemic," said Phyllis Karpe, who lives up the road from the proposed kennel.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | June 25, 2000
His friends call him Sparky. At 8 years old, he's already traveled coast to coast. He's seen Paris lights, Vermont ski slopes, Florida beaches and the Grand Canyon. He has his own page on the Internet and a job: He's a "roving reporter." But, perhaps, that should be rover-ing reporter, because Sparky is a beagle. "When we adopted him," says Wendy Ballard, Sparky's owner, "we tried to take a vacation and bring him along, but the welcome mat was yanked out from beneath us." That was in 1993.
NEWS
March 6, 2000
Zoning appeals board approves small kennel The Board of Zoning Appeals has approved a conditional use for a kennel for fewer than 10 dogs at 1023 Wesley Road in Finksburg. The 87.56-acre property is owned by Robert Henry Miller and is zoned agricultural. The kennel is located in the center of the property and meets the lot requirements for the zoning ordinance. Miller owns six beagles, a foxhound and an Eskimo dog. He said he does not intend to board any dogs. The board, which heard no complaints from neighbors and found no adverse impact on the area, approved the request.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | February 22, 1999
Marion Thompson addressed her Chinese Shar-Pei with fond impatience."Now why can't you do that in the ring? You look so good."Dekema's Spice Girl -- known at home as Holly -- tilted her head in reply and took the admonition to heart. Minutes later, she trotted into Ring 5 and emerged with a second-place ribbon, two championship points and an owner whose impatience had been replaced with triumph.Holly was one of 14 Chinese Shar-Peis competing in the 87th Maryland Kennel Club show yesterday, among the nation's oldest dog shows.
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