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NEWS
March 1, 1991
Earl Hopkins Pinder, clerk of the Circuit Court of Kent County for 28 years, died Wednesday at his home near Chestertown after a brief illness. He was 77.Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m. tomorrow at Shrewsbury Episcopal Church in Kennedyville.native of Kent County, Mr. Pinder was a longtime activist in Republican Party politics at the state and regional levels.Mr. Pinder spent the early years of his career in the MarylanState Police, where he rose to the rank of first sergeant before leaving in the late 1940s.
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NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,matthew.brown@baltsun.com | January 5, 2009
KENNEDYVILLE - Coaxed to reflect on his 18 years in Washington, Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest acknowledges a single regret. "If I had to do it all over again, I wouldn't have run," he said. "I probably would have rested my days as an outfitter taking people on horseback rides in the northern Bitterroot towns of Idaho. Lived out a peaceful existence, in a log cabin that was still filled up with snow in May." It is a typically idiosyncratic answer from the Eastern Shore Republican, who spent time counting moose in Idaho between jobs as a high school history teacher and a house painter before he won his seat in 1990.
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NEWS
March 1, 1991
Services for Earl Hopkins Pinder, clerk of the Circuit Court of Kent County for 28 years, will take place at 1 p.m. tomorrow at Shrewsbury Episcopal Church in Kennedyville.Pinder, who was 77, died Wednesday at his home near Chestertown after a brief illness.Mr. Pinder spent the early years of his career in the MarylanState Police, where he obtained the rank of first sergeant before leaving in the late 1940s. In the early 1950s, he and his first wife, Emma Knight, opened a stationery store that they operated until he won his first term as court clerk in 1962.
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
KENNEDYVILLE -- Rep. Elijah E. Cummings had a question for hog farmer Jennifer Debnam as she handed him a plastic bag of boar semen. "UPS delivers this?" he asked, warily. "Yes, UPS or FedEx," Debnam replied as she held the tools used for artificially inseminating sows. "I just did a tour the other morning of UPS," said Cummings, with a chortle. "Now, I have a new appreciation for them." It's less than a two-hour drive from Democrat Cummings' Baltimore district to this Eastern Shore town.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2000
KENNEDYVILLE -- Four grainy images flicker on the television screen in Keith Boone's office, monitoring every facet of streamlined efficiency that Horizon Organic Dairy has brought to the 133-acre Kent County farm the Colorado-based corporation bought three years ago. A glance at the video system allows the 41-year-old dairyman to calculate how much feed 520 or so cows are consuming or how quickly things are going in the milking parlor where workers milk...
NEWS
By GWYNETH K. SHAW and GWYNETH K. SHAW,SUN REPORTER | April 20, 2006
KENNEDYVILLE -- Rep. Elijah E. Cummings had a question for hog farmer Jennifer Debnam as she handed him a plastic bag of boar semen. "UPS delivers this?" he asked, warily. "Yes, UPS or FedEx," Debnam replied as she held the tools used for artificially inseminating sows. "I just did a tour the other morning of UPS," said Cummings, with a chortle. "Now, I have a new appreciation for them." It's less than a two-hour drive from Democrat Cummings' Baltimore district to this Eastern Shore town.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | September 24, 2000
DON'T THREATEN Congressman Wayne Gilchrest. I'm warning you. He'll leave for No Man's Land if you vote him out of office. He has left civilization before. Packed up and moved to the Idaho wilderness, where he had to cross several mountains to reach his closest neighbor. Mr. Gilchrest has represented much of Anne Arundel County, the entire Eastern Shore and a sliver of Baltimore for the past eight years, but he isn't that comfortable in the big city of Washington anyhow. In Congress, he has got to shave and wear a tie. He can't admire the farms or the woods.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | December 18, 1990
KENNEDYVILLE -- "San Francisco is tough; it's hard to think they won't do it again," said the big guy at the other end of the goose blind.His credentials were enough to convince me -- and this day he also convinced me of his shooting prowess. He gets a lot of practice. His hunting itinerary is awesome.Since the pro football season started, he has shot waterfowl in Ontario, Wisconsin, Louisiana, Montana and Illinois, pheasants in Iowa, not to mention a trip to Poland for wild boar. Also, he has scored a Grand Slam in sheep: a desert in Mexico, dall in Alaska, big horn and stone in British Columbia.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Dail Willis and Joe Mathews and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
KENNEDYVILLE -- Le Verne Kohl didn't pay much attention Monday afternoon when he saw planes and helicopters flying over his 2,000-acre nursery in Kent County.But he remembered the flights Tuesday at noon when 33 armed agents of the Immigration and Naturalization Service swarmed his business, blocking every exit, impounding his employment records and shutting off telephone service for hours while they detained 86 Hispanic immigrant workers employed by Angelica Nurseries Inc."We had Waco over there, except we didn't have the fire and the shooting," Kohl, Angelica's president and co-owner, said yesterday afternoon as he described the raid to a friend and fellow agriculturalist, Floyd Price, over lunch at Vonnie's Restaurant.
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | June 4, 1991
KENNEDYVILLE -- You've been eating oatmeal all your life, then someone puts a juicy steak in front of you. What do you do? Take a big bite naturally.And that's just what the exceptionally scrappy fish of several pounds did to my small Beetle Spin lure before it thrashed on the surface next to the catwalk on 12-acre Goose Valley Lake.Just when I figured I had won, it dove for the bottom under the walk, snagged a plank, and departed with my white soft plastic lure with black lead head still in its jowls.
NEWS
By NORRIS WEST | September 24, 2000
DON'T THREATEN Congressman Wayne Gilchrest. I'm warning you. He'll leave for No Man's Land if you vote him out of office. He has left civilization before. Packed up and moved to the Idaho wilderness, where he had to cross several mountains to reach his closest neighbor. Mr. Gilchrest has represented much of Anne Arundel County, the entire Eastern Shore and a sliver of Baltimore for the past eight years, but he isn't that comfortable in the big city of Washington anyhow. In Congress, he has got to shave and wear a tie. He can't admire the farms or the woods.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2000
KENNEDYVILLE -- Four grainy images flicker on the television screen in Keith Boone's office, monitoring every facet of streamlined efficiency that Horizon Organic Dairy has brought to the 133-acre Kent County farm the Colorado-based corporation bought three years ago. A glance at the video system allows the 41-year-old dairyman to calculate how much feed 520 or so cows are consuming or how quickly things are going in the milking parlor where workers milk...
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
KENNEDYVILLE -- Pat Langenfelder got a preview yesterday morning of the environmental scrutiny that all large Maryland livestock farms might face in the near future.About 25 inspector trainees with the Environmental Protection Agency and environmental offices of surrounding states converged on her Kent County farm.They were looking for evidence of harmful byproducts from the manure streaming from the 2,400-hog operation. Those byproducts could seep into the waters of nearby Morgan Creek and eventually flow into the Chesapeake Bay.The inspector trainees looked at the mustard-green slime produced from the flow of hog manure from a breeding barn into a 1 1/2 -acre storage lagoon.
FEATURES
By FRANK LANGFITT and FRANK LANGFITT,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 5, 1997
KENNEDYVILLE -- Campaigning in a suit that reeks of cat urine would be a disadvantage for most politicians. But for Wayne Gilchrest, it was a money magnet.Back when Gilchrest was first running for Congress, his wife, Barbara, draped his only suit on a windowsill in their home to air it out. That night, a cat urinated just outside the window. In the morning, Gilchrest was a walking litter box.After a day driving across the Eastern Shore in his Plymouth Horizon, he pulled up to a big house with white columns in Easton seeking a little more money for his low-budget campaign.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Dail Willis and Joe Mathews and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1996
KENNEDYVILLE -- Le Verne Kohl didn't pay much attention Monday afternoon when he saw planes and helicopters flying over his 2,000-acre nursery in Kent County.But he remembered the flights Tuesday at noon when 33 armed agents of the Immigration and Naturalization Service swarmed his business, blocking every exit, impounding his employment records and shutting off telephone service for hours while they detained 86 Hispanic immigrant workers employed by Angelica Nurseries Inc."We had Waco over there, except we didn't have the fire and the shooting," Kohl, Angelica's president and co-owner, said yesterday afternoon as he described the raid to a friend and fellow agriculturalist, Floyd Price, over lunch at Vonnie's Restaurant.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Sun Staff Correspondent | August 20, 1995
KENNEDYVILLE -- You'd never know it from the way he ambles about his home here in a ragged T-shirt and muddy work boots, but Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest has suddenly hit the big time in Washington.With his party's takeover of Congress this year, the three-term congressman from the Eastern Shore has been transformed from an obscure, kind of oddball backbencher into a national leader of a band of pro-environmental Republicans -- one of the most influential tribal factions in the party.He's waging floor fights, brokering votes, even tutoring House Speaker Newt Gingrich to try to thwart those Republicans who see many environmental regulations as a kind of government intrusion and are trying to get rid of them.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1998
KENNEDYVILLE -- Pat Langenfelder got a preview yesterday morning of the environmental scrutiny that all large Maryland livestock farms might face in the near future.About 25 inspector trainees with the Environmental Protection Agency and environmental offices of surrounding states converged on her Kent County farm.They were looking for evidence of harmful byproducts from the manure streaming from the 2,400-hog operation. Those byproducts could seep into the waters of nearby Morgan Creek and eventually flow into the Chesapeake Bay.The inspector trainees looked at the mustard-green slime produced from the flow of hog manure from a breeding barn into a 1 1/2 -acre storage lagoon.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1994
KENNEDYVILLE -- It was his 12-year-old daughter, Katie -- and not the callers and letter writers from Maryland's 1st District -- who persuaded the congressman to get rid of his whiskers."
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1994
KENNEDYVILLE -- It was his 12-year-old daughter, Katie -- and not the callers and letter writers from Maryland's 1st District -- who persuaded the congressman to get rid of his whiskers."
SPORTS
By Bill Burton | June 4, 1991
KENNEDYVILLE -- You've been eating oatmeal all your life, then someone puts a juicy steak in front of you. What do you do? Take a big bite naturally.And that's just what the exceptionally scrappy fish of several pounds did to my small Beetle Spin lure before it thrashed on the surface next to the catwalk on 12-acre Goose Valley Lake.Just when I figured I had won, it dove for the bottom under the walk, snagged a plank, and departed with my white soft plastic lure with black lead head still in its jowls.
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