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NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Add one more item to the "In/Out" list that has emerged from this month's ground-shifting election:OUT: Congress' freshman orientation at Harvard.IN: A legislative crash course at the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore Hotel.Breaking with a 22-year tradition, the Republican-heavy freshman class of the 104th Congress will be forgoing the usual six-day orientation at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government.Instead, most new members will be attending a 2 1/2 -day orientation conference in Baltimore next month sponsored by two conservative think tanks, the Heritage Foundation and Empower America.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, Justin Fenton and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
Last weekend's fatal shooting of a plainclothes Baltimore police officer — by colleagues who mistook him for an assailant — has taught a stunned force the same hard lesson learned by other agencies whose officers made similar deadly mistakes. In 27 cases across the country since 1980 in which police officers were mistakenly killed by other officers, all but one involved a victim who was not in uniform. Among them was last Sunday's shooting of Officer William H. Torbit Jr., an eight-year veteran of the Baltimore police force who was killed by fellow officers while trying to break up a rowdy crowd outside a club.
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NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
The Glendening administration is funneling $3.6 million in crime-fighting grants to Baltimore, including $100,000 to develop a plan to reduce youth gun violence and scores of smaller awards to community groups to erect fences, improve lighting and pay for after-school programs.Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend described the grants, which will help underwrite new programs and fund existing ones, as an extension of the administration's anti-gun initiative, unveiled this week. On Wednesday, the Glendening administration said it would target illegal-gun trafficking, create a state "gun czar" and put more effort into battling criminals in crime "Hot Spots."
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,The Hartford Courant | August 24, 2003
Ron Mazzoli has just completed a crash course in Dorm Living 101. When he arrived at his student apartment recently in Lowell House on the Harvard University campus in Cambridge, Mass., he found the space outfitted with two beds, two desks, a few chairs and not much else. His phone and computer weren't hooked up, and he hadn't yet been assigned a mailbox. He quickly learned to carry a large bag for any purchases with him when he went out (it cuts down on trips up and down the stairs), make friends with the dorm staff (good sources for extra furnishings)
NEWS
By Korky Vann and Korky Vann,The Hartford Courant | August 24, 2003
Ron Mazzoli has just completed a crash course in Dorm Living 101. When he arrived at his student apartment recently in Lowell House on the Harvard University campus in Cambridge, Mass., he found the space outfitted with two beds, two desks, a few chairs and not much else. His phone and computer weren't hooked up, and he hadn't yet been assigned a mailbox. He quickly learned to carry a large bag for any purchases with him when he went out (it cuts down on trips up and down the stairs), make friends with the dorm staff (good sources for extra furnishings)
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
The Glendening administration is funneling $3.6 million in crime-fighting grants to Baltimore, including $100,000 to develop a plan to reduce youth gun violence and scores of smaller awards to community groups to erect fences, improve lighting and pay for after-school programs.Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend described the grants, which will help underwrite new programs and fund existing ones, as an extension of the administration's anti-gun initiative, unveiled earlier this week. On Wednesday, the Glendening administration said it will target illegal-gun trafficking, create a state "gun czar" and put more effort into battling criminals in crime "Hot Spots."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
Thomas J. D'Alesandro III had his pick in 1967 when, as the newly elected mayor of Baltimore, he went looking for skilled professionals to serve in his administration. It was a different story three decades later when D'Alesandro helped seek prospects for another new mayor, Martin O'Malley. He approached a half-dozen people. Every one took a pass. "A lot of people feel that local government is the employment of last resort," D'Alesandro said. "I've been on a lot of search committees and I know a lot of people who wouldn't even entertain the idea."
NEWS
March 9, 2000
THE ACADEMIC with the shoulder-length brown hair stood before several hundred policemen, prosecutors and politicians this week and made a dramatic pronouncement. Baltimore, he said, is going to be a very different place in a year. David M. Kennedy, the criminologist from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, said focused, newly energized law enforcement agencies and the resources of the Park Heights neighborhood will have "an extraordinary impact on a problem that just a little while ago we had given up on."
NEWS
By Alessandra Stanley and Alessandra Stanley,New York Times News Service | October 26, 1991
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Sen. Edward M. Kennedy went to the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University yesterday to discuss his future in politics, and to do so he stepped back and tried to address the hurdle of his past.He apologized to his constituents in Massachusetts without specifying what he had done wrong in his private life, but he suggested that in the future he would mend his ways."I am painfully aware that the criticism directed at me in recent months involves far more than honest disagreements with my positions, or the usual criticism from the far right," he said steadily, looking up from his prepared text, over the heads of 800 members of the audience and straight into a bank of television cameras.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, Justin Fenton and Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
Last weekend's fatal shooting of a plainclothes Baltimore police officer — by colleagues who mistook him for an assailant — has taught a stunned force the same hard lesson learned by other agencies whose officers made similar deadly mistakes. In 27 cases across the country since 1980 in which police officers were mistakenly killed by other officers, all but one involved a victim who was not in uniform. Among them was last Sunday's shooting of Officer William H. Torbit Jr., an eight-year veteran of the Baltimore police force who was killed by fellow officers while trying to break up a rowdy crowd outside a club.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | August 23, 2002
Thomas J. D'Alesandro III had his pick in 1967 when, as the newly elected mayor of Baltimore, he went looking for skilled professionals to serve in his administration. It was a different story three decades later when D'Alesandro helped seek prospects for another new mayor, Martin O'Malley. He approached a half-dozen people. Every one took a pass. "A lot of people feel that local government is the employment of last resort," D'Alesandro said. "I've been on a lot of search committees and I know a lot of people who wouldn't even entertain the idea."
NEWS
March 9, 2000
THE ACADEMIC with the shoulder-length brown hair stood before several hundred policemen, prosecutors and politicians this week and made a dramatic pronouncement. Baltimore, he said, is going to be a very different place in a year. David M. Kennedy, the criminologist from the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard, said focused, newly energized law enforcement agencies and the resources of the Park Heights neighborhood will have "an extraordinary impact on a problem that just a little while ago we had given up on."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
In April, seven developmentally disabled children planted a small sapling outside their East Baltimore school in honor of Earth Day and in memory of those killed at Columbine High School in Colorado.Yesterday, they discovered their 18-inch tree was gone, apparently ripped out by the roots.A small laminated tag with the names of the young gardeners also was missing.The apparent theft sent ripples through the Fairmount Avenue school, part of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which treats children with severe neurological disorders.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
The Glendening administration is funneling $3.6 million in crime-fighting grants to Baltimore, including $100,000 to develop a plan to reduce youth gun violence and scores of smaller awards to community groups to erect fences, improve lighting and pay for after-school programs.Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend described the grants, which will help underwrite new programs and fund existing ones, as an extension of the administration's anti-gun initiative, unveiled earlier this week. On Wednesday, the Glendening administration said it will target illegal-gun trafficking, create a state "gun czar" and put more effort into battling criminals in crime "Hot Spots."
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | July 10, 1998
The Glendening administration is funneling $3.6 million in crime-fighting grants to Baltimore, including $100,000 to develop a plan to reduce youth gun violence and scores of smaller awards to community groups to erect fences, improve lighting and pay for after-school programs.Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend described the grants, which will help underwrite new programs and fund existing ones, as an extension of the administration's anti-gun initiative, unveiled this week. On Wednesday, the Glendening administration said it would target illegal-gun trafficking, create a state "gun czar" and put more effort into battling criminals in crime "Hot Spots."
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
The Kennedy Krieger School brings new meaning to special education.The East Baltimore center succeeds with tough kids where other schools have failed or given up.That's essentially what the U.S. Department of Education said when it chose Kennedy Krieger as one of only two special education schools in the country to receive the coveted Blue Ribbon School Award. Students and staff of Kennedy Krieger's Middle School will celebrate the award today with ceremonies at the Fairmont Avenue school.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1999
In April, seven developmentally disabled children planted a small sapling outside their East Baltimore school in honor of Earth Day and in memory of those killed at Columbine High School in Colorado.Yesterday, they discovered their 18-inch tree was gone, apparently ripped out by the roots.A small laminated tag with the names of the young gardeners also was missing.The apparent theft sent ripples through the Fairmount Avenue school, part of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, which treats children with severe neurological disorders.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1996
The Kennedy Krieger School brings new meaning to special education.The East Baltimore center succeeds with tough kids where other schools have failed or given up.That's essentially what the U.S. Department of Education said when it chose Kennedy Krieger as one of only two special education schools in the country to receive the coveted Blue Ribbon School Award. Students and staff of Kennedy Krieger's Middle School will celebrate the award today with ceremonies at the Fairmont Avenue school.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 23, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Add one more item to the "In/Out" list that has emerged from this month's ground-shifting election:OUT: Congress' freshman orientation at Harvard.IN: A legislative crash course at the Radisson Plaza Lord Baltimore Hotel.Breaking with a 22-year tradition, the Republican-heavy freshman class of the 104th Congress will be forgoing the usual six-day orientation at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government.Instead, most new members will be attending a 2 1/2 -day orientation conference in Baltimore next month sponsored by two conservative think tanks, the Heritage Foundation and Empower America.
NEWS
By Alessandra Stanley and Alessandra Stanley,New York Times News Service | October 26, 1991
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Sen. Edward M. Kennedy went to the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University yesterday to discuss his future in politics, and to do so he stepped back and tried to address the hurdle of his past.He apologized to his constituents in Massachusetts without specifying what he had done wrong in his private life, but he suggested that in the future he would mend his ways."I am painfully aware that the criticism directed at me in recent months involves far more than honest disagreements with my positions, or the usual criticism from the far right," he said steadily, looking up from his prepared text, over the heads of 800 members of the audience and straight into a bank of television cameras.
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