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Kennedy Krieger Institute

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NEWS
Erica L. Green | February 20, 2013
Former State Superintendent Nancy Grasmick has joined the staff of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, a renowned special education and research institution, where she will lead a new Center for Innovation and Leadership in Special Education.  The Institute announced this week that Grasmick, who started her career teaching deaf children at William S. Baer School in Baltimore, will serve as the director of the newly formed center which they said...
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2014
William Smith's disease has grim milestones. At 2, the Gambrills triplet known as Mick couldn't walk or talk as well as his siblings. In kindergarten, he started losing language and motor skills. At 12, he needed a wheelchair and a feeding tube. Doctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital dedicated to treating his symptoms said he had an undiagnosed progressive neuromuscular disease. But a new test may provide something the family has long sought: a name. "The idea that there is something out there that can tell you [what's wrong]
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NEWS
January 25, 2010
Sometimes the appearance of a birthmark catches a new parent by surprise. Physicians are often quick to offer reassurance that most birthmarks are harmless, and many will shrink or disappear over time. Although that's true, a birthmark can also be the key to early identification of a rare disorder called Sturge-Weber Syndrome. Dr. Anne Comi, director of the Hunter Nelson Sturge-Weber Center at Kennedy Krieger Institute, tells us how to determine when a birthmark might be a sign of something more.
HEALTH
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2014
Inviting a friend to play on a tire swing can be difficult for autistic children, but with special kinds of playgrounds cropping up in Maryland and around the country, it may become easier. The Shafer Center, a school in Owings Mills for autistic children ages 2 to 8, recently installed a playground intended to help children with social interaction and motor skills. Specialized equipment can "foster social interaction" between autistic children, who sometimes have a more difficult time interacting socially and using social cues, experts say. "A lot of pieces on the playground require more than one person," said Kristen DeBoy, an applied behavioral analysis therapist at the Shafer Center.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris | joseph.burris@baltsun.com | April 1, 2010
The basketball players settle into drills with the precision and fluidity of a vintage squad - despite the fact that many of them cannot move their bodies from the waist down. Thanks in part to Gerry Herman, they're a wheelchair team to be reckoned with - and among the favorites in April's national championship tournament. For more than 20 years, he and wife Gwena have been co-directors of the Kennedy Krieger Institute's Physically Challenged Sports and Recreation Program, making track stars out of youngsters who can't walk, basketball players out of those who can't jump, and confident striders of those whose sudden falls make the able-bodied gasp.
NEWS
February 27, 1996
Because of an editing error, an article in Sunday's Carroll County edition incorrectly identified a family member who received outpatient treatment for childhood lead poisoning through Baltimore's Kennedy Krieger Institute. David Williams, 4, of Taneytown, completed a course of treatment as an outpatient.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
May 28, 2009
The Baltimore Sun is committed to providing fair and accurate coverage. Readers who have concerns or comments are encouraged to call us at 888-539-1280. A recent story about a therapy garden at the Kennedy Krieger Institute did not note the project's landscape architect, Mahan Rykiel Associates.
NEWS
October 28, 2007
On October 26, 2007, VIRGINIA MAE (nee Carter) COLLINS, beloved wife of the late Frank B. Collins, loving mother of Joan Blair, Frank M. Collins and Debbie Collins, cherished grandmother of Ray, Danielle, Jess and Rachel and great grandchildren, Brandon and Trevor. Also survived by 3 dear sisters. Friends may call at the family owned Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk Inc., 7922 Wise Avenue on Tuesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9P.M. Funeral Service Tuesday 8P.M. Interment Arlington National Cemetery, November 19, 2007.
NEWS
September 21, 2004
On Saturday September 18, 2004, EVELYN LEVIN (nee Josephson) beloved wife of the late Dr. Nathan Levin, loving cousin of Dr. Bernard Blackman, of Miami, FL. and Dr. Bernard Siegel, of Yonkers, NY. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd., at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Tuesday September 21 at 11 A.M. Interment at Arlington Cemetery Chizuk Amuno Congregation, 4300 N. Rogers Ave. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made, in her memory, to...
NEWS
December 23, 2007
Elise Kraner Babbitt & John Glenn Welker, both of Baltimore, were married November 10, 2007, by Rev. Laura Cannon, at The Maryland Club in Baltimore, Md. The bride is the daughter of Mr. & Mrs. Fred & Janis Babbitt of McGaheysville, Va. The groom is the son of Mr. & Mrs. Glenn & Alicia Welker of Silver Spring, Md. Daniel Babbitt & Charles Hager were ushers. Natalie & Meg Williams were flower girls. The bride graduated from Spotswood High School & received a B.A. in Government from the University of Virginia.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2014
How do public health experts handle research when they know they cannot offer subjects the best medical treatment possible - only "less than the best" solutions? It poses serious ethical issues, especially when children are involved in the research, as a controversial Kennedy Krieger Institute study shows. Just 20 years ago, most houses in East Baltimore contained lead paint that was known to be poisoning children at epidemic levels. Amid the crisis, researchers at the pediatric hospital sought cheap, effective abatement techniques because full-scale cleanup could cost $20,000 or more per house - more than many of the properties were worth.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Kimberly Smith believed she was "in good hands" when she rented an East Baltimore rowhouse nearly 20 years ago that was part of a Kennedy Krieger Institute study of lead paint remediation techniques. Kennedy Krieger takes care of children, Smith thought at the time. One of her children had suffered lead poisoning when the family had lived elsewhere, she recalled in a recent interview, and she was pregnant then with her fourth child, Cecil. "I was told it was a great opportunity - it was lead-safe," Smith said.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
The campus at Kennedy Krieger Institute in East Baltimore is about to get a little bigger with plans for a new outpatient building to be built in part with an $8 million gift from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. Demand for outpatient treatment is growing 20 percent a year, contributing to the need for more space to expand services, Kennedy Krieger CEO Dr. Gary Goldstein said in announcing the plans Wednesday. "The building is full," Goldstein said. "This program has grown enormously because of the need," he added.
NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2013
Al DeCesaris turned his bicycle off Central Avenue and into the parking lot of Davidsonville Elementary School and pedaled about 100 yards before he was greeted by a band of loud, cheering fourth-graders carrying homemade signs and posters. DeCesaris, 40, an attorney who recently moved from Maryland to California, had spent the previous night with his parents in Riva, so he had had to ride just a few miles to the school for the rally Monday morning. That's far below his average ride of about 70 miles a day since Sept.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman, The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Jeremy Wells would not be competing in the Baltimore Marathon Saturday had he not broken his back in a motorcyle accident last November. Now paralyzed below the waist, Wells, of Abingdon, will race in the handcycle event, perched in a three-wheeler and pedaling furiously with his hands. It's his way of flirting with normalcy, the 27-year-old paraplegic said. "Running was never my thing. I wouldn't have given this race a thought," Wells said. Then came that day in Essex when he skidded off his motorcycle at 55 miles per hour, got hit by a car and lost the use of his legs.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Michael Laban Malin, a manager for a Kennedy Krieger Institute program for autistic children who was recalled for his outgoing personality, died of brain cancer Tuesday at his mother's North Baltimore home. He was 34 and lived with his family in Canton. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of David Hirsh Malin, a co-founder of the Jemicy School, and Judith Ann Malin, an administrator at St. Elizabeth's School in Northeast Baltimore. He attended the Baltimore Montessori School and was a 1998 graduate of Friends School, where he played soccer and lacrosse and sang in the school chorus.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| May 14, 2013
Kennedy Krieger Institute has announced a new program that will offer free autism screenings to infants between five and 10 months who have a sibling with autism.  “We launched this initiative to increase the likelihood of identifying children most at risk for ASD,” said Rebecca Landa, director of the Center for Autism and Related Disorders at Kennedy Krieger. “My hope is that Maryland families will take advantage of this opportunity to seek help sooner and not miss out on early intervention, which can improve lifelong learning, communication and social skills.” For more information or to schedule an appointment visit Kennedy Kreiger's website or call 443-923-7892.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2013
Virginia Thorndike strolls through the garden in front of her Monkton home each morning, carefully observing the ways the flowers have changed from the previous day. She sums up the feeling that overcomes her: "Gratitude. " Thorndike designed her garden as a spiritual retreat, positioning plants in ways that draw on ancient religious practices. Laid out in a half circle, the garden is bisected by a waterfall that ends in a pond at the base of a hill. Stones frame a yin-yang circle populated by Hoogendorn hollies.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
It's a dream Ida Heck never really expected to come true. Her family has raised about $1 million since 2005 for research into the rare disorder that afflicts her 8-year-old daughter, Jenna, resulting in cognitive deficits, seizures, long-lasting migraines, glaucoma in one eye and a red birthmark on the right side of her face. She's been driven by a fervent hope that the money would help finance a breakthrough. Yet she had her doubts: "So often you give and give and give and never hear of any findings.
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