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By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2011
Through the magic of television, America and 180 other countries will watch tonight as ABC's Extreme Makeover: Home Edition unveils a new home for a 24-year-old quadriplegic patient at Baltimore's Kennedy Krieger Institute. But in fact, Brian Keefer has been living in the house since it was finished in June, and he says it gives him "so much independence, it's incredible. " Keefer was paralyzed from the chest down in a gymnastics accident in 2008 and has been a patient at Kennedy Krieger since.
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NEWS
June 10, 2014
Timothy Wheeler and Meredith Cohn 's article on lead-paint lawsuits underscores a much larger issue in Baltimore: Most lead-poisoned children live in poverty ( "Lead-paint lawsuits dogs Kennedy Krieger," June 7). Adverse childhood experiences such as community violence, discrimination, parental separation and divorce, incarceration and malnutrition are increasingly appreciated as circumstances that make children more vulnerable to environmental toxins like lead. Lead abatement doesn't completely remove lead from homes.
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FEATURES
By Patricia Meisol and Patricia Meisol,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Judy Woodruff, the senior CNN correspondent, and Al Hunt, executive Washington editor for the Wall Street Journal, didn't know what to expect the summer day in 1998 when they brought their eldest son to Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore. "We were so scared," Hunt recalled.Jeff, then 16, was semi-comatose, the result of a routine surgery gone awry. He couldn't walk, talk or eat, even blink his eyes; most of the day, he slept. Oddly, the therapist who arrived in his room within the first hour didn't seem to notice.
HEALTH
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Kimberly Smith believed she was "in good hands" when she rented an East Baltimore rowhouse nearly 20 years ago that was part of a Kennedy Krieger Institute study of lead paint remediation techniques. Kennedy Krieger takes care of children, Smith thought at the time. One of her children had suffered lead poisoning when the family had lived elsewhere, she recalled in a recent interview, and she was pregnant then with her fourth child, Cecil. "I was told it was a great opportunity - it was lead-safe," Smith said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | December 8, 2002
Cool. The perfect word for the 13th annual "Festival of Trees Preview Breakfast." The 1,100 guests had to deal with frigid temperatures outside as they hurried to the Cow Palace at the Maryland State Fairgrounds. Once inside, guests were greeted by Christmas trees decorated in a Hairspray theme, honoring the 1987 movie by Baltimore filmmaker John Waters, and the current Broadway musical hit based on the film. Cool. Oh. And let's not forget super-cool hostess Lainy Lebow-Sachs, dressed in a white beehive wig and poufy, pink satin dress.
NEWS
By Diana K. Sugg and Diana K. Sugg,Sun Staff Writer | September 6, 1995
As part of an exchange sparked by a father's concern for his child, Kennedy Krieger Institute will train Vietnamese physicians and therapists how to care for the disabled children of Vietnam.During his visit to Hanoi this week, former President George Bush is awarding scholarships to two Vietnamese therapists to train at Kennedy Krieger in Baltimore. They will be funded by Citibank, which sponsored his visit. The bank will also send a multidisciplinary team from the institute to Vietnam after Thanksgiving to do an evaluation.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | January 10, 1994
The Kennedy Krieger Institute, which annually serves more than 8,000 children who have developmental disabilities, is about to construct a $5 million expansion of its headquarters in East Baltimore.As designed by Gaudreau Inc. of Baltimore, the 35,000-square-foot addition will rise just west of the current five-story building at 707 N. Broadway. The seven-story building will provide additional office and conference space for the growing staff of the institute, which conducts research and provides specialized rehabilitation care for disabled children.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | May 26, 1997
The Kennedy Krieger Lower School is one of three elementaries in the Baltimore area selected as a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence by the U.S. Department of Education."
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Staff Writer | October 9, 1992
The Kennedy Krieger Institute, which annually serves more than 8,000 children with developmental disabilities, is planning a $4 million expansion of its headquarters at 707 N. Broadway in East Baltimore.The plans were unveiled one day before today's dedication ceremonies for the institute's $8.5 million school in Washington Hill for children with physical and learning disabilities.Representatives for the institute yesterday showed Baltimore's Design Advisory Panel plans that call for a seven-story addition containing office and conference space for the organization's growing staff.
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | July 28, 1999
The Kennedy Krieger Institute plans to open its new high school on the New Children's Hospital campus in North Baltimore, rather than at the former Eastern High School as originally planned.The institute will sign a lease to occupy the campus' Bennett Institute building for a year while negotiations continue on the purchase of a permanent location there. The Kennedy Krieger School will open Sept. 7 with about 45 students.Robin Church, the institute's assistant vice president for education, said Kennedy Krieger is seeking to buy 15 acres on the site and also occupy at least part of the hospital building, which would either be renovated or torn down.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
The campus at Kennedy Krieger Institute in East Baltimore is about to get a little bigger with plans for a new outpatient building to be built in part with an $8 million gift from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. Demand for outpatient treatment is growing 20 percent a year, contributing to the need for more space to expand services, Kennedy Krieger CEO Dr. Gary Goldstein said in announcing the plans Wednesday. "The building is full," Goldstein said. "This program has grown enormously because of the need," he added.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2014
Mary Spencer-Smith, a former sales associate who later worked with autistic children, died Jan. 24 of undetermined causes at her Hampstead home. She was 56. "We are waiting for the results of an autopsy as to the cause of death," said her husband of 22 years, Charles L. "Chuck" Smith Jr., a field engineer. The daughter of Willis Spencer, a Gilman School teacher, and Susanne Spencer, a homemaker, Mary Willis Spencer was born in Baltimore and raised in Roland Park. After graduating from St. Timothy's School in Stevenson, Ms. Spencer-Smith attended St. Mary's College for several years, before earning a bachelor's degree in 1981 from the University of Alabama, where she had majored in English literature with a minor in creative writing.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Michael Laban Malin, a manager for a Kennedy Krieger Institute program for autistic children who was recalled for his outgoing personality, died of brain cancer Tuesday at his mother's North Baltimore home. He was 34 and lived with his family in Canton. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of David Hirsh Malin, a co-founder of the Jemicy School, and Judith Ann Malin, an administrator at St. Elizabeth's School in Northeast Baltimore. He attended the Baltimore Montessori School and was a 1998 graduate of Friends School, where he played soccer and lacrosse and sang in the school chorus.
HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2013
It's a dream Ida Heck never really expected to come true. Her family has raised about $1 million since 2005 for research into the rare disorder that afflicts her 8-year-old daughter, Jenna, resulting in cognitive deficits, seizures, long-lasting migraines, glaucoma in one eye and a red birthmark on the right side of her face. She's been driven by a fervent hope that the money would help finance a breakthrough. Yet she had her doubts: "So often you give and give and give and never hear of any findings.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| May 14, 2013
Kennedy Krieger Institute has announced a new program that will offer free autism screenings to infants between five and 10 months who have a sibling with autism.  “We launched this initiative to increase the likelihood of identifying children most at risk for ASD,” said Rebecca Landa, director of the Center for Autism and Related Disorders at Kennedy Krieger. “My hope is that Maryland families will take advantage of this opportunity to seek help sooner and not miss out on early intervention, which can improve lifelong learning, communication and social skills.” For more information or to schedule an appointment visit Kennedy Kreiger's website or call 443-923-7892.
FEATURES
By Kristine Henry,
The Baltimore Sun
| April 5, 2013
Anne Moore Burnett knew the other moms at the playground were rolling their eyes at her. Her son wouldn't go down the slide unless it was clean, so she was looking around for a stray napkin or anything she could find to wipe it down. As she felt their eyes on her, Burnett found herself almost wishing her son had a visible condition, such as Down Syndrome, so that at least on top of the issues she was dealing with she wouldn't also feel judged by other parents who didn't realize she took these "extra" measures because her son has sensory-sensitive autism.
SPORTS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
The Kennedy Krieger Institute will accept a $50,000 gift pledged by Orioles second baseman Roberto Alomar, and matched by the Orioles, despite a request from umpires that the money be rejected.The money was offered by Alomar on Monday as part of an apology to American League umpire John Hirschbeck, whom Alomar spat on during an argument over a called strike Friday in Toronto.Tim Welke, a representative of the umpires' union, urged the institute to reject Alomar's money. Accepting it, he said, would send the wrong message, " that if you've got a lot of money, you can buy your way out of trouble."
NEWS
Erica L. Green | February 20, 2013
Former State Superintendent Nancy Grasmick has joined the staff of the Kennedy Krieger Institute, a renowned special education and research institution, where she will lead a new Center for Innovation and Leadership in Special Education.  The Institute announced this week that Grasmick, who started her career teaching deaf children at William S. Baer School in Baltimore, will serve as the director of the newly formed center which they said...
EXPLORE
By Steve Jones | November 17, 2012
Bob Nobles III plans to be a Santa's helper this year. He will distribute toys and other gifts to young people who come to the Kennedy Krieger Institute's upcoming Festival of Trees. But it won't be the first time that the New Windsor teenager has put a smile on someone else's face. Nobles, a junior at Baltimore's Kennedy Krieger High School, was chosen as the 2012 ambassador for the holiday gala known as Festival of Trees. Nobles, who has Asperger's Syndrome, is used to public appearances.
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